Which iPads hold their value, wifi or 3/4G?

Discussion in 'iPad Tips, Help and Troubleshooting' started by jlewis2727, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. jlewis2727 macrumors newbie

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    Mar 11, 2012
    #1
    I am considering selling my original iPad and getting a new one. My first iPads had AT&T 3G connectivity, but I never used it, and they are heavy as heck. I use the hotspot capability from my iPhone 4 when I want to use an iPad online, but my iPhone isn't 4G. Anyway....if I don't think I'll use the 4G capability, would it be wise to buy the 4G model anyway because of aftermarket value, or do the WiFi models hold their value just as well. TIA for your answers.
     
  2. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    #2
    In absolute dollar value, the base model seems to hold its value better than the higher level models. Don't expect to recoup any more than half of the cost of each "upgrade" step.

    In other words - Only pay for added capacity or 4G capability if you feel the cost is worth having the capability or capacity. Note that the 4G model includes real GPS capability that works even if you don't buy a data plan. (it's limited in that case to any maps or apps currently loaded unless wifi is available)

    FWIW, the wifi vs 3G iPad1 weight difference was 50g, less than 2oz. On the iPad2 and new iPad the difference is more like 10 or 12 grams. Not enough to notice IMHO.
     
  3. jlewis2727 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    That's an interesting point. The 4G model accesses GPS? What kind of apps do you mean would be able to utilize GPS? The weight difference is now greatly reduced? The iPad 1 weighs a ton and was starting to give me carpal tunnel syndrome.
     
  4. garlicipad macrumors newbie

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    Dec 8, 2011
    #4
    I sold my iPad 2 white 16gb for $300. I consider that a darn good sale. Granted the guy wanted it fast for his trip overseas.
     
  5. aneftp macrumors 601

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    Jul 28, 2007
    #5
    The Garmin app ($50) around a 2GB app.

    It can use the iPad 4G/3G native GPS without any data usage.

    That may be a big selling point for paying an extra $130. Also those iPad with gps work awesome on boat navigation.

    Was on my buddy's boat to the Florida keys and he used the iPad GPS as his main GPS for deep sea fishing. We were like halfway to Cuba on the boat.
     
  6. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    #6
    Go to http://www.apple.com/ipad/ then click on "Tech Specs" on the upper right. Easy way to familiarize yourself with the specs.

    The 3G/4G chips include a GPS chip. Works even without a data plan enabled if the app you're using has its maps or other info pre-downloaded as does the Garmin app or other navigation apps such as NavFree. As noted, the apps are big. Navfree GPS, which is free BTW, uses about 2.5GB.

    The GPS capability works with the other location aware stuff for better accuracy than wifi location stuff when on wifi. Examples being Yelp and UrbanSpoon (very handy when travelling!), Facebook, geotagging photos, or the handy FindMyiPhone function via iCloud.

    Not everyone feels it's a value, but many people do.
     
  7. Buildbright macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    That is scary! To be offshore without a "true" gps device. 40 miles offshore you have no cell reception to assist.
     
  8. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    #8
    You're incorrect in thinking it's not a "true" GPS device, if for no reason other than aneftp's direct experience. aGPS devices typically don't require cell towers to assist in getting a fix, they use them to get a faster fix and/or increase accuracy in low-signal situations.
     
  9. Buildbright macrumors 6502a

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    Aug 25, 2011
    #9
    I live in the Tampa area and go deep sea fishing often okay buddy. aGPS (assisted GPS) and GPS are different. Ask anyone with a Captains license about using a non-saltwaterproof and cellphone signal dependant device on a boat? Offshore?

    http://www.diffen.com/difference/A-GPS_vs_GPS

    You are incorrect in talking about something you can only read about. But go ahead have fun with your phone or ipad on your boat 40 miles offshore.
     
  10. deeddawg, Mar 12, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012

    deeddawg macrumors 604

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    #10
    Geez, take a chill pill. I never said it was a good idea to rely on a consumer grade device in a marine/saltwater environment. My point being that both get their position data from satellites even though aGPS devices can use additional means for a shorter time to first lock.

    I'm curious, you've actually used your ipad 40 miles at sea and were unable to get a GPS position even giving it time to get a lock?

    Although I've not taken an ipad to sea, I have carried iphones while backpacking in the mountains well away from any cell towers. I've never been unable to get a GPS fix even in valleys/coves with zero service from any provider. Of course that usage was just for curiosity/geotagging photos; in the mountains I rely on compass and map as neither require batteries. I would never recommend a cell phone or ipad GPS as a primary location device in a situation where one's life might depend on it.
     
  11. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    Feb 19, 2005
    #11
    ^ I've taken an iPhone out to sea and had issues but it was the original iPhone.
     

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