Which Lion-compatible HP LaserJet MFP printer to buy?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by ron4735, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. ron4735 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    #1
    Hello everyone from a just-registered newbie! I am completely switching from my Dell desktop PC to all-Apple everything very soon. I want to complete the process glitch-free(don't laugh). I will purchase an Apple MacAir and Time Capsule (router+HD combo) for home-based wireless connectivity. Which HP LaserJet all-in-one MFP for home use would be a wise purchase? It must, of course, work seamlessly with the Lion OS and support AirPrint. Should the wireless printer chosen ALSO have an ethernet connection in case I want to occasionally use it non-wirelessly or is this a waste of money? What features on the MFP have you found you cannot do without. I will get an iPhone later once I learn the functionality of the initial purchases. Many thanks in advance for your patience with a newbie. I apoligize for this "dissertation". This forum will be a great resource for me. I appreciate the practical expertise of all those postings I've seen thus far. Happy New Year to all!
     
  2. Krazy Bill macrumors 68030

    Krazy Bill

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    #2
    Isn't this question more suited for vendors who actually sell HP printers? (And welcome)
     
  3. robgendreau macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #3
    I suggest you check to see which MFP's have upgraded drivers for Lion, and when they came out. HP usually lags behind Brother and Canon in this regard. If the printer company doesn't quickly respond with software upgrades, esp. with a MFP, then I'd reconsider buying from them.

    Some HP printers do Airprint, but if you have a Mac you can buy Printopia by ecamm and it will allow printing from an iPhone or iPad to any printer attached to a Mac.

    Most wifi printers I've seen have ethernet ports as well. Good to have.

    I think MFPs are a waste at the consumer level, since usually they're mediocre scanners with mediocre printers, but I admit I haven't used one in years. If you have to do stand-alone copying without a computer, I guess you're stuck with them. You need to look at consumable cost and the features of the scanner and what software it works with. If you're intending to scan photos you may need something different than if you're scanning documents; and then there's duplex, etc. We can't advise you about a tool without knowing what your intended uses are.

    Rob
     

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