Which MBR good for video editing?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by BFMV409, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. BFMV409 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    #1
    I currently have a MacBook 13" with 2.26GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, 250GB Memory and 4 GB RAM. I'm assuming there's no way this thing will be able to handle video editing, but can it be upgraded with anything so that it can or am I looking at a new MBR? I want to be able to record video game content using an HD PVR and post videos to youtube, and maybe recording some guitar covers. I don't feel like spending $2000 on a new computer, so is there maybe a used or refurbished MBR I can get for like $1000-1500? Any help appreciated!
     
  2. Spadoinkles macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Location:
    Florida
    #2
    Should be fine for the kind of video work you do if my late-06 whitebook can cope with some commercial HD stuff.
     
  3. Demosthenes X macrumors 68000

    Demosthenes X

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    #3
    How do you think video editing was accomplished in the past? Your MacBook is more powerful than any computer from 5-6 years ago, and they managed to edit content. If your notebook supports it, I would upgrade to 8GB of RAM. It's a cheap upgrade, and well worth it.

    If you really want an upgrade, though, there's currently a quad-core i7 15" available in the refurb store (http://store.apple.com/us/product/FC721LL/A). That would handle all your editing needs without any trouble. It's the last-gen machine, but it's still plenty powerful and a lot of power for the money.
     
  4. mofunk macrumors 68000

    mofunk

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Location:
    Americas
    #4
    My Powerbook G4 I occasionally edit videos on. :) The rendering is slow compared to my MBP but it's doable. It would run faster if I had an external drive.


    btw what is a MBR?
     
  5. BFMV409 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    #5
    Don't know why I kept saying MBR, I of course meant MBP, MacBook Pro. Also, guys on a side note. Is $1600 for a brand new 15-inch MacBook Pro 2.0 GHz i7 4/500GB MC721LL/A NIB a good deal, it also include 1-yr warranty? There's also a used MacBook Pro 15 Unibody Laptop MC372LL/A Mid-2010 for $1100 which is using 2.56 GHz and i5 Processor, same memory, RAM ext.Either of these a good deal, if so which one? The former comes to a total of $1600, and the latter a total of $1430 after taxes, shipping and a one year warranty.
     
  6. Demosthenes X macrumors 68000

    Demosthenes X

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    #6
    The first one is an all right deal. The refurb is cheaper, but has worse graphics. I'd skip the second one: it's a dual-core processor, and for not a lot more you can get a quad-core machine that will render your video much faster.
     
  7. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Location:
    Terra
    #7
    I have the exact same MBP, though I've upgraded mine to 8 GB RAM, as well as a 7200 rpm drive. You can absolutely edit video on this machine. I edited full 1080p video on my PowerBook G4 in college. It was slow, but as long as I got the codecs right I was able to do the editing just fine and the biggest amount of slowdown was in the export. You don't at all need to get a new computer, just upgrade to 8 GB RAM and get an external drive on FireWire 800, it will help a lot.

    Let me know if you have any questions, I went to school for this stuff.
     
  8. randomrazr macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    #8
    ANY MACBOOK can video edit. its whether ur willing to pay extra to increase the speed of rending videos and such
     
  9. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Location:
    Terra
    #9
    This is not actually true, depending on what video format you are using. If you shoot with DV/HDV, then you NEED a firewire port to import your video, which means the MacBooks after and including the aluminum model can't do it, unless you can import on a different computer first. If we're talking about AVCHD, which is more common these days, this statement is correct, though I don't fancy editing on a Core Duo MacBook.
     

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