Which one for 3D work and rendering

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by LauraGrubbe, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. LauraGrubbe macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #1
    15-inch: 2.2GHz
    with Retina display
    Specifications
    2.2GHz quad-core Intel Core i7
    Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz
    16GB 1600MHz memory
    256GB PCIe-based flash storage1
    Intel Iris Pro Graphics

    Or

    15-inch: 2.5GHz
    with Retina display
    Specifications
    2.5GHz quad-core Intel Core i7
    Turbo Boost up to 3.7GHz
    16GB 1600MHz memory
    512GB PCIe-based flash storage 1
    Intel Iris Pro Graphics
    NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M with 2GB GDDR5 memory

    These are my options. I'll be using it for 3D work and rendering which my old iMac can't handle anymore and then some school work (I study medialogy at uni)
    But is the extra 3000dkk worth it? Is the other graphics card gonna give a noticeable oomph when doing 3D or is it all the same and would these computers even be able to do 3D for 3+ years without burning to a crisp?

    Any experiences?
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    I would thing the dGPU equipped rMBP would be better suited for tasks such what you mention
     
  3. Baklava macrumors 6502a

    Baklava

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Location:
    Germany
  4. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #4
    What applications do you use? Very few of them actually use the GPU for actual rendering, the GPU is only used to show the scenes in the editor (please correct me if I am wrong). At any rate, for GPU-based high-quality rendering (which often uses raytracing), the Iris Pro should be faster because of its more flexible memory access capability. The 750M is faster for simple linear operations on large datasets (such as photo/video processing on high resolutions). Again, I don't have any factual benchmark data to back this up because they don't seem to exist — I am just extrapolating from other benchmarks and what I know about the algorithms involved.

    P.S. Also look here for reference: http://www.barefeats.com/rmbpc1.html
     
  5. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #5
    Autodesk Maya is certified to work with the NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M.
     
  6. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #6
    I'll be using Maya, v-ray, After effects, nuke and the other basics like photoshop etc. I've been working on my iMac (4+ years old) but now I can't work for more than 1 hour or render more than 30 sec before it flatlines.

    Do you think it's realistic to expect it to last 3+ years when doing kinda heavy work assignments?

    And based on your answers + my good friends advice I've decided to go all out and buy the "big" one.
     
  7. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #7
    You should be fine. The rendering is the thing that sends the chips flying, not the editor.
     
  8. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #8
    Yea but I will be doing maybe a few hours of rendering once in a while... It's just my old computer who can't do more than 30sec, it's not that I don't do anything that takes much longer ;)
     
  9. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #9
    The longest I've done was 10 hours straight and my machine is still going, so I don't see why a 2014 with dedicated graphics would differ.
     
  10. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
  11. okwhatev macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    #11

    Because you can USE THE GPU to render in Maya. I still don't get why so many people dismiss a dedicated GPU. You're huffing paint if you think an integrated is EVER going to match a dedicated GPU. If you're doing 3D work, for the love of god by a laptop with a dedicated GPU.
     
  12. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #12
    I know rendering is all about the CPU but it's nice to know a mac has been rendering for 10 hours straight and is still going strong. I am considering the extra graphic card because the viewport is slow and glitches atm and I would like to have a bit smoother experience even when I'm 5+ hours in. And the CPU is better in the more expensive one too ;)
     
  13. paolo- macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    #13
    You shouldn't have trouble leaving your computer doing rendering for extended periods. However, keep in mind that the computer will be running near it's thermal limit which could lower the life expectancy of some of the parts. I do renderings from time to time, even had my old macbook going for a whole weekend and didn't budge. My 2011 mbp had a different fate, mind you...

    On another note, I'd really suggest getting a custom PC if you do this type of work all the time. A 1000USD gaming rig would be much faster than the top MBP and would also run cooler. Not to mention you could just change the graphics card in a few years if it start being slow.
     
  14. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #14
    paolo- I used to work on a pc and it was **** to say the least. Even tho the specs were much better than my iMac my workflow was horrible and it was no better in speed or rendering time until my iMac started having overheating problems and since the pc had a big ass fan it didn't. I don't want to buy a cheaper pc cause it's not worth it for me, I know it's different for others maybe but it's a very individual thing and my work will suffer from such a change.

    Atm I'm only at uni but when i graduate I will either get a Mac Pro or there will be one at work so I won't have to worry about it. That said, I would still like to have this computer for at least 3, hopefully 5 years while doing rendering from time to time without it breaking down completely.
     
  15. paolo- macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    #15
    I can perfectly respect that. I do engineering and design work on a mac. Mind you, I have to run windows on it since a lot of the programs are only available for windows.

    That being said, if I was mainly doing more rendering and 3D animation or didn't need to work off a laptop, I would certainly be using a windows workstation for my work and possibly have a tiny apple laptop for when I need it.

    I've had my ups and down with PCs as well. But a properly built machine running a fresh installation of windows is actually quite ok. It's not mac os, but it works. Most pre-built consumer systems are quite horrible. They cut corners in the configuration and build, they bloat the software and don't offer reliable support. If you look into a workstation, you might get a different experience. Having a custom system might also make a lot of sense, you can get exactly the hardware you need and save a few bucks too.

    While I take it you're not the biggest gearhead, in a tech heavy field you'll come out on top by being versatile and knowing at least a bit about the technology that you're depending on. Sadly, macs may not be as common place as you think in the industry. Especially since the Final Cut Pro X debacle, I know there has been a lot of migration towards PC in video. Especially if you're dealing with 3D work which is very intensive, the additional cost of Apple systems is a tough pill to swallow for most companies.

    I hope my tone wasn't berating as that's really not my intention here. Yes the MBP will get the job done, but it's really not the ideal solution in my eyes.
     
  16. LauraGrubbe thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2014
    #16
    Yea I know they both have their advantages and if money is an issue I would consider a custom com with OS (the OS makes a huge difference in my workflow, and small stuff like keyboard and mouse I can't stand at school. It's kinda fun how the little things make a huge difference!)

    I'll see in the future, I'll probably end up using both but hey, as long as i love what i do on them it's fine. But for now it'll be a mac cause that's what I know and right now I just need something i can rely on 100% and time is money and finding a laptop pc will take me way too long! ;)

    Appreciate your comment!
     

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