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Sun Baked

macrumors G5
May 19, 2002
14,936
156
Depends on where you live, and the reliability of the power system in your area.

A power strip with 1000 Joules of surge suppression is twice as much as that and will likely offer some protection for the equipment.

If you spend a lot of money on equipment, at least spend $20-30 to get a surge suppressor with the most protection you can find.

I had a decent one while I was waiting on a UPS with pure sine output to go on sale locally (finally did).
 

RobertBosworth

macrumors newbie
Apr 29, 2016
28
1
Do not think it's a good idea to buy it for such price. The quality matherials claim money, so if you buy it to use for short period of time - its okay, but if you'd like to use it further, it will be an issue and you can rely just on luck.
 

scott911

macrumors 6502a
Aug 24, 2009
758
455
I'd go with a known brand in the surge protection area - like apc, etc.
they would have a reputation to protect by making sure quality control is high.

example 1 :
-- you : My $12 APC power stripe failed, destroying my $2000 mac.
your friend: that's terrible!

exmaple 2:
-- you : My $2.51 ikea power strip failed, destroying my $2000 mac.
your friend: dude, you're an idiot. ~said while your futon collapses.

:)
 

adam9c1

macrumors 68000
May 2, 2012
1,867
309
Chicagoland
Here is my setup:
wall outlet - cheap IKEA power strip - Kill a Watt power meter - cheap IKEA power strip:
- UPS1: - computer stuff
- UPS2: - computer stuff
- UPS3: - computer stuff

for my TV and cable box I use a Belkin
 

Tomorrow

macrumors 604
Mar 2, 2008
7,160
1,364
Always a day away
People rely more heavily on "surge protection" than they should. It's a lot of hype without as much real danger as you might think.

A house four or five doors down was struck by lightning the other day and our power blip'd out. We lost a GFCI outlet and two phone chargers (the phones plugged therein were fine). Nothing else in the house was harmed - no TV's, computers, electronics, etc. And we don't own a single surge protector (which won't protect against a lightning strike anyway).

There seem to be too many variables in the mix to make it worth worrying about. If it were me, I'd buy the power strips and use them.
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,308
43,134
Is this good enough for expensive computer and TV systems? If not what specifications of power strip should I look into when buying one? Thanks.
its a glorified extension cord. If that's all you're looking for, then I guess its ok. I'm not sure I'd trust it on my 2,000 dollar iMac, but that's me
 
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Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
34,004
15,338
California
Hello, IKEA is selling a pair of power strips at $5.99.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/70086401/

Is this good enough for expensive computer and TV systems? If not what specifications of power strip should I look into when buying one? Thanks.

From your wording, it sounds like you might be looking for a surge protector, and as others have mentioned, that device is not a surge protector.

http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-surge-protector/

Here is a recent review of surge protectors that may help you if that is what you really want. IMO Wirecutter has pretty decent tech recommendations.
 

RedTomato

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2005
4,155
442
.. London ..
You need something like this:

24031-004-8D61DAC0.jpg
 

JamesPDX

Suspended
Aug 26, 2014
1,056
495
USA
Here is my setup:
wall outlet - cheap IKEA power strip - Kill a Watt power meter - cheap IKEA power strip:
- UPS1: - computer stuff
- UPS2: - computer stuff
- UPS3: - computer stuff

for my TV and cable box I use a Belkin

If that Kill-a-Watt device has a single point of failure, it will ruin your equipment. If you want to know how much power you are using, look up the spec and do the math. For a power strip, I'd go with a Furman: Something EVS/SMP protection: http://www.furmansound.com/product.php?div=02&id=PST-8
 
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RobertBosworth

macrumors newbie
Apr 29, 2016
28
1
You need something like this:

24031-004-8D61DAC0.jpg
Did you know that the lightning rod height It is equal to the radius of its protection from the lightning strike..pay attention to materials from which it was made because if they will be not of the good quality you'll see how it it will rust in 3 years.
 

westom

macrumors regular
Nov 8, 2009
231
23
Is this good enough for expensive computer and TV systems? If not what specifications of power strip should I look into when buying one?
For AC power, a power strip is best value ONLY if it has what most never bother to learn or discuss - a 15 amp circuit breaker. That breaker is essential for human safety.

Some demonstrated protection. Lightning rods protect the structure because and only if lightning is connected to what does protection - earth ground. Protector only protects appliance if it also connects low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) to earth ground.

Others foolishly recommended a $3 power strip with ten cent protector parts selling for an obscene $25 or $80. A magic strip that costs many times more and does not claim to protect from destructive surges. In some cases, can make expensive computer damage easier. How do you know one recommends without first learning facts? Where is the always required earth ground connection? Where are spec numbers discussed?

Like lightning rods, a protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Sources that easily scam consumers (such as wirecutter.com) forget to mention that. And forget to provide specification numbers for protection. The most easily scammed always ignore numbers.

A power strip for 'human' protection must have that 15 amp circuit breaker. A power strip for 'transistor' (hardware) protection must say where hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate. Those near zero power strips from companies with lesser reputations (Belkin, APC, etc) do not claim hardware protection. Near zero joules numbers. No 'always required' low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earth ground.

Informed consumers get a power strip with a 15 amp breaker. And properly earth a 'whole house' protector. If anything needs that protection, then everything needs protection. Using a protector that actually makes a low impedance connection to earth - for about $1 per protected appliance. From other companies known for integrity. A superior solution that actually does protection costs tens of times less money. Is completely unknown to a majority only educated by advertising, hearsay, wild speculation, and who ignore specification numbers. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.
 

HBOC

macrumors 68020
Oct 14, 2008
2,497
234
SLC
i have a few APC strips i got from Frys for like $20 each several years ago. All work fantastic. Costco has a really nice one that is big that i was looking at as well as i need one more. I would forego the ikea
 

westom

macrumors regular
Nov 8, 2009
231
23
Yes, surge protector is the one I should be getting.
Which one? One that only claims to protect from surges that typically cause no damage? And sometimes can make damage easier? Or another and completely different one with numbers that actually claim protection?
 
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Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
34,004
15,338
California
Which one? One that only claims to protect from surges that typically cause no damage? And sometimes can make damage easier? Or another and completely different one with numbers that actually claim protection?
Exactly how was this post the least bit helpful to the OP?
 

westom

macrumors regular
Nov 8, 2009
231
23
Exactly how was this post the least bit helpful to the OP?
Bogus (subjective) recommendations from wirecutter.com were posted. It recommended near zero protectors that do not even claim to protect from destructive surges. How was that helpful? Recommendations without spec numbers are best ignored.

Described were two completely different devices - both called surge protectors. One does not claim to protect from surges that typically do damage. Those near zero joule protectors even created fires. Near zero joules? Why does wirecutter.com not even discuss a critical joules number? How many joules will each protector absorb? wirecutter.com is subjective. Subjective is how junk science gets promoted.

A completely different device, called a surge protector, was also discussed. With numbers that claim to protect from destructive surges - including lightning. Effective protectors always protect from direct lightning strikes - and do not fail. That effective protector is routinely found in facilities that cannot have damage. With a low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to what defines protection - single point earth ground.

Why was a wirecutter.com citation helpful? It wasn't. It did not even mention what is critical - earth ground. First indication of junk science reasoning - no spec numbers. You best divorce yourself from wirecutter.com's bogus (subjective) recommendations.

A concept this new is little understood until maybe after a third reread. Summarized was an effective device - called a surge protector. And a near zero, ineffective device - also called a surge protector. Which 'surge protector' will be purchased? One that can even make appliance damage easier? And does not claim to protect from typically destructive surges? Or a completely different device for about $1 per protected appliance that actually claims effective protection - with specification numbers? Best recommendation also said what it does and why - with numbers.

Two completely different devices are both called surge protectors. One can even make appliance damage easier. Its near zero joules have even causes fire. And is recommended by wirecutter.com. Another is the only solution always implemented in structures that cannot have damage. Costs about $1 per protected appliance. Another number they forgot to mention when promoting ineffective protectors with obscene profit margins and near zero joules.
 
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Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
34,004
15,338
California
Recommendations without spec numbers are best ignored.

All you are posting is rude and condescending comments... again with NO recommendations. If you have a specific device with a link that would help OP, please post it up. So far you are just rambling about how we are all too dumb to understand what surge protection is.
 

westom

macrumors regular
Nov 8, 2009
231
23
All you are posting is rude and condescending comments... again with NO recommendations.
Bogus is a recommendation without spec numbers. That is not emotional or insulting. That is a technical fact. A fundamental difference exists between honest recommendations and junk science reasoning.

wirecutter.com claims are subjective. It never says what a protector must do. It provides no spec numbers nor says which are relevant.

Best is to divorce yourself from technically inaccurate speculation. Best is to learn why a 'whole house' solution exists when damage cannot happen.

Did you know some cruise ships will confiscate those wirecutter.com protectors? Those protectors (a potential fire) are too dangerous. Why did wirecutter.com not discuss that? Same reason it did not even mention how many joules each will absorb. Subjective reasoning creates junk science conclusions.

Insulting is to make recommendations without first learning facts and without perspective (ie numbers). We should feel insulted because you recommended by ignoring specification numbers. But we are forgiving. Humans make mistakes. We expect one to learn from mistakes. And not become emotional.

Best recommendation was provided. A properly earthed 'whole house' protector is rated (at least) 50,000 amps. Earthing is the most critical requirement. Numbers and facts were provided previously. Companies of integrity provide such products including Intermatic, Square D, Ditek, Siemens, Polyphaser (an industry benchmark), Syscom, Leviton, ABB, Delta, Erico, and General Electric. A Cutler-Hammer (Eaton) sells in Lowes and Home Depot. Nobody needs a model number. It is a 'whole house' protector. It has a dedicated wire for that low impedance connection to earth. It meets minimal spec numbers such as 50,000 amps. Spec numbers - not a name - are relevant.

Monster has a long history of identifying scams. Then selling an equivalent product for even higher prices. Monster's protector is electrically similar to Belkin, Panamax, APC, and Tripplite. With no connection to earth. Since more expensive and recommended by ignoring spec numbers, then Monster reaps massive profits.

OP is strongly encouraged to earth what actually does protection. Provided are relevant numbers and a along list of companies known for their integrity. Best recommendation is to properly earth one 'whole house' solution. To even protect a near zero joule, plug-in protectors.

Emotion is irrelevant. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. OP needs one protector (with sufficient numbers) to protect all household appliances.

I am sorry if that makes you angry. But this is a technical discussion. Specification numbers and why it works are required and provided.
 
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Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
34,004
15,338
California
Best recommendation was provided.

No it wasn't.

A properly earthed 'whole house' protector is rated (at least) 50,000 amps. Earthing is the most critical requirement. Numbers and facts were provided previously. Companies of integrity provide such products including Intermatic, Square D, Ditek, Siemens, Polyphaser (an industry benchmark), Syscom, Leviton, ABB, Delta, Erico, and General Electric. A Cutler-Hammer (Eaton) sells in Lowes and Home Depot.

See there... now you have made a recommendation.

You could have just done that right out of the gate and politely explained why you thought this was best and skipped all the condescension.
 
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westom

macrumors regular
Nov 8, 2009
231
23
You could have just done that right out of the gate ....

Required is any 'whole house' protector (sold like rice), rated at least 50,000 amps, and the low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to single point earth ground. Again, no protector does protection. Protection is defined by numbers. Especially since a protector is only as effective as its earth ground - that wirecutter.com will never discuss.

You still misunderstand. For some reason you want subjective names - as if that says what does protection. Numbers and earth ground define protection. Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules are harmlessly absorbed.

What is a model number or trade name for that 'always required' system 'component'? Some best protection systems have no protectors. In every effective 'system', single point earth ground always exists. Why still assume a protector does protection? Why still confuse protection with a protector. Best recommendation was in that first post.

Stated so many times: A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. That remains the OP's best recommendation - based in over 100 years of well proven science.

Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Not some manufacturer name. Earth ground. That means protection for a computer, expensive TV, and every other household appliance - dishwasher, air conditioner, GFCIs, refrigerator, recharging electronics, and the most critical appliance during a surge - smoke detectors.
 
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Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
34,004
15,338
California
You still misunderstand. For some reason you want subjective names - as if that says what does protection.

I understand just fine. All you had to do was explain what you believed was best and why, then to be even more helpful maybe give some links with product suggestions for the OP. I guess that was too much to expect and you would rather go on with your condescending and unhelpful comments.
 
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