Which processor config for toast

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by bbadalucco, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. bbadalucco macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2009
    #1
    I've read around but don't want to speculate too much on a large purchase like this.

    I have a bunch of blu ray video files on a server which I'd like to convert so that I can watch them on my mac mini (HTPC). On average they are about 20gb. I want to convert them via Toast 10 Titanium to something which can be view on the mini.

    Which processor config would you recommend? Ideally anyone have a clue how long the following would take:

    2.93 quad
    2.26 oct
    2.66 oct

    anyhelp would be appreciated
     
  2. cmaier macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #2
    Search this forum. Someone has already posted at least one toast 10 benchmark.
     
  3. iMpathetic macrumors 68030

    iMpathetic

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    IMBY
  4. bbadalucco thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jan 4, 2009
    #4
    Don't recall that being part of my question.
     
  5. t4cgirl macrumors member

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    Feb 22, 2008
    #5
    Still, you might as well just have your mini handle the Toast jobs overnight, and spend the $3k on fresh produce for a year.
     
  6. vaderhater245 macrumors 6502

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    Mar 4, 2008
    Location:
    Flagstaff, AZ
    #6
    if it's just for toast then a new mini should be fine. Have a external plugged into if you need more space.
     
  7. TrapOx macrumors 6502

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    Dec 4, 2008
    Location:
    Denver
    #7
    The Mini would be more than capable of handling that job. Spending $3-4K on a computer for a single menial task is a huge waste.
     
  8. JesterJJZ macrumors 68020

    JesterJJZ

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    #8
    Or a kickass home theater system...to watch on instead of your mac mini...
     
  9. darrenscerri macrumors regular

    darrenscerri

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Location:
    Malta
    #9
    For the fastest encoding go for the 2.66GHz octa. But in my opinion the 2.26GHz has more bang-for-the-buck, the price difference is too much. Or as t4cgirl said, encode your movies overnight and save the $3000.
     
  10. iMpathetic macrumors 68030

    iMpathetic

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    IMBY
    #10
    I apologize, I thought I was being funny.

    Carry on.
     
  11. boogieman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2004
    #11
    I can tell u that going from a 2.66 quad early 2007 to the new 2.26 octo that my time for a bluray encode and burn time using toast 10 went from nearly 9 hours to a little under a hour. And I tested it using the same movie on both machines so it was well worth the upgrade for me.
     
  12. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

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    Jun 16, 2007
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    近畿日本
    #12

    Wait... hate to state the obvious. But the money you spend on a MP for the conversion of those 'media files' would be way more than buying the original Blu-Ray Discs and the state-of-the-arts Blu-ray player/recorder...
     
  13. cmaier macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #13
    I have about 700 dvds and 100 blu-rays, and I'd love not to have to get up, go find the disk I want, carry it to the blu-ray player (which in my case could be on a different floor than the floor where the disks are stored), wait for the blu-ray player to power up and do its dance, then have to reverse the process when its done. Streaming everything from a central location to each TV so I can select the movie I want with a remote control seems pretty nice to me, and it's a heck of a lot cheaper than a Kaleidescape.
     
  14. bamf macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    #14
    That's what I do as well. It sure is convenient to have the same files show up on my AppleTV and my Mac Mini HTPC - and all without me having to go find a disk...
     
  15. Tesselator macrumors 601

    Tesselator

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Japan
    #15
    I have about 3,000 DVDs and I'll bet 10% of them don't even work any longer. I've discovered that DVD recording is only good for temporary storage and backup. This is why I don't get the whole BlueRay thing. Why would I want slower, less stable, more expensive media recording? Isn't this what Steve Jobs said as well regarding Apple's official position on BlueRay? It is. Anyway, I guess I could understand it as a delivery format if you're working in an industry where your customers can accept it or want it. In that case any of the New Mac Pros (all of the new Mac Pros) are going to cut your times WAY down like boogieman was saying. 8-core will fair better than 4-core machines for the actual encoding part.
     

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