Which program for me?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by tuxtpenguin, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. tuxtpenguin macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #1
    I have a video of myself giving a presentation. I borrowed a coworkers video camera to film myself. That worked. Since then, I brought the camera home and hooked it up to my PMG5. I opened iMovie 08 and imported the video to iMovie 08. OK. So I checked out the video and the lights in the room were so that I appear as a head and arms and you can't even see the presentation on the screen. I've tried to do some basic color correction in iMovie 08, but nothing I have tried has brought the colors down enough to have a decent video. I can say that I am not literate in any graphics programs, so I may be overlooking the functionality I need from iMovie 08. If iMovie 08 isn't what I need, what other programs should I look for to edit this video? Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    #2
    It sounds like you were overexposed (blown out). Unfortunately, there's not a lot you can really do with an overexposed image...with ANY software.
     
  3. tuxtpenguin thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #3
    Thanks Captain Chunk. That's what I was afraid of. Guess I'll have to present again and get it recorded again. Thanks for the answer.
     
  4. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    #4
    No problem, and sorry things didn't work out for you the first time around.

    The reason overexposed images are difficult to correct is because there's very little color information in the image to work with. The camera will see overexposure as white (absence of color information).

    At least with underexposure, you can color-correct it by ramping up the contrast (usually at the expense of added noise, but it's better than nothing).

    In the future, you can avoid a lot of overexposure problems by white balancing your camera properly and adjusting the aperture/iris (if your camera does this).
     

Share This Page