Which tools do you use for your graphics if you are not a graphic designer?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by frank100, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. frank100, Sep 10, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012

    frank100 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    #1
    After some time googling around, I still cannot find a good tool for a problem I guess that most iOS and Mac programmers have. Most of the icons I deal with are in PNG format, but you know, that is not a good format if you want to resize, specially whenever I want an extra small version for a table cell.

    On the other hand there are also free icons in PSD, and usually the format given by most graphic designers.

    I own Pixelmator and it suits my editing needs... except when it comes to resizing icons because of its awful vector graphic support. I don't want to buy Photoshop because Pixelmator does everything else I need, however I am usually stuck with a PSD file and unable to cut / resize the icon I want.

    I have seen many vectorial and/or vector graphics tool, but when working with icons I usually just want to cut / resize an icon from a PSD file with vector graphics. What do you use for you icons? What is out there at a reasonable price if you just want to resize? I have some tools that helps you to get the right size if you want an icon for a navigation bar, push button, menu, table cell... but that is just a minor wish.

    For the people with more experience dealing with graphic designers. I could even make this question more generic: Which alternative tools (non $$$ Adobe) do you usually use to deal with the work given by graphic designers?
     
  2. desertman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Location:
    Arizona, USA
    #2
    Your posting is a little confusing because both PNG and PSD files are pixel-based graphic files and not vector-based graphic files.

    Two good alternatives for Photoshop (= pixel-based graphic files) are GraphicConverter ($40 shareware; http://www.lemkesoft.com/content/188/graphicconverter.html) and GIMP (free; http://gimp.lisanet.de/Website/News/News.html). I know for sure that GraphicConverter can work with PSD files but I don't know whether GIMP can do it.

    Alternatives for Illustrator (vector-based graphic files) could be Inkscape (free; http://inkscape.org/), Lineform ($80 shareware; http://www.freeverse.com/mac/product/?id=6020) and Sketch ($50 shareware; http://www.bohemiancoding.com/sketch/)

    It would be great if you could post some of your experiences here if you try any of these applications.

    Greetings - desertman
     
  3. takeshi74 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    #3
    Clearly state your budget. Don't just assume that your notion of reasonable is universal. For many, Adobe apps are reasonable.
     
  4. frank100 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    #4
    considering I just want a tool to resize I would not like to spend more than 20$ for only that feature. Looking at low end graphic tools I could conceive buying a program for no more than 100$

    Photoshop alone ranges between 700$ and 1300$ and that does not seem an acceptable price range for a tool I might need no more than one hour every month. I would be ok with the >3,000$ of the whole suite if I were using it 8 hours a day.

    ----------

    well, I know that PNG is a pixel-based graphic format. However I thought that PSD can be pixel-based or vector-based, unless of course, I am confused with Adobe Illustrator files.

    I do have seen some packages icons which claim to be vector-PSD files, however they do pixelate when resizing with Gimp or Pixelmator
     
  5. aarond12 macrumors 65816

    aarond12

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Location:
    Dallas, TX USA
    #5
    My non-graphic artist friend uses Adobe Fireworks for a lot of his graphic needs. PhotoShop is way beyond him, if that gives you an idea of Firework's skill level. :D
     
  6. desertman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Location:
    Arizona, USA
    #6
    Why do you use pixel-oriented applications for (allegedly) vector-based files? No wonder that they pixelate.
     

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