Which Windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by Stebbo47, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. Stebbo47 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    #1
    As a new convert to mac I need to put a microsoft OS on so that I can continue to use a couple of programmes that don't have a mac version. I've got various copies of XP, all of which are rather old and I thought it really would be better to buy Windows 7. I'm only looking at the Home Premium but don't know whether I need the 32 bit or 64 bit version. I understand I'm not able to simply upgrade as this isn't possible from XP so I therefore need a full version. The computer incidentally is the 27" 2.7 Ghz if that helps.
    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Stebbo
     
  2. Razorhog macrumors 65816

    Razorhog

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    #2
    The amount of RAM in your machine is a big factor. 32 bit OSs can only utilize 4GB of RAM. Go with a 64 bit version of Windows 7 to take advantage of more than 4GB.
     
  3. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2012
    #3
    I've only got 4GB at the moment but fully intend to at least double that fairly soon. All I expect to use the Windows side for is Corel Draw and the software that drives my vinyl printer/cutter which is called Roland Versaworks. So the 64 bit version sounds like the one to go for - thanks
    Stebbo
     
  4. charlieegan3 macrumors 68020

    charlieegan3

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    U.K
    #4
    if this is boot camp then go for 64bit. don't bother buying higher than home premium though.

    is it boot camp or vmware etc?
     
  5. Razorhog macrumors 65816

    Razorhog

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    #5
    After you boost your RAM (get as much as you can get), you might consider running your current copy of XP (or a new copy of windows 7) in a virtual machine such as Parallels or VMWare Fusion. I use VMWare Fusion and it is a fantastic program.
     
  6. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2012
    #6
    When I explained my needs in the Apple Store they did me a really good deal by including amongst other things the Parallels package, so I guess thats what I'll use. It just seemed a more convenient option to Bootcamp.
     
  7. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    Oregon
    #7
    Look at the requirements of the Windows programs you have. If they are 32 bit programs, running a 64 bit Windows gets you nothing. Also check if these older programs will run in XP (they probably will). If so, then save money and use what you have.

    I run Windows 2000 and XP for Windows programs here (WordPerfect 8, MicroGrafx Designer, Quicken, IBM Visual Age for Java, and a few other old programs) and only run Windows 7 virtual machines for checking program compatibility of some software I sell.
     
  8. R3k macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 7, 2011
    #8
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit - OEM
     
  9. adam1080 macrumors regular

    adam1080

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    #9
    i'm using my iMac at work(my company is a Microsoft Gold Partner), so i installed Windows 7 Enterprise 64 bit(same as Ultimate). Right now i have 12 GB or RAM(8GB more arrives in the mail today:D) and in boot camp the thing screams!! Running in parallels it is plenty fast.

    you gotta go 64 bit to get what you paid for out of the system.
     
  10. flatfoot macrumors 65816

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    Aug 11, 2009
    #10
    Win 7 Home Premium 64bit has an artificial RAM limit of 16GB. See here. That's Microsoft! :rolleyes:

    I use Win 7 Pro 64bit in the rare cases I need to use Windows.
     
  11. R3k macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    Wow, didnt know that. Thanks for the info!
     
  12. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2012
    #12
    Thanks for all your advice. It looks as though it's all heading in the same direction and I'm happy to go with Home Premium but will it handle all my old XP files? I've checked the compatibility lists and all looks OK but I'm sure I've read that some XP files need 'XP Mode' which is only available with Windows 7 Professional. Incidently there also seems to be a Home Premium N version ! Anybody know anything about it ?
     
  13. flatfoot macrumors 65816

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    #13
    I guess that 'XP Mode' is more about application compatibility. Data files depend on their applications, not the OS.
     
  14. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2012
    #14
    Hi Flatfoot,
    I thought I was being clever by checking compatibility lists - 'simples' - I thought but now you've confused me. You need to know that I have very little understanding of a computers innards. I only repeat what I've picked about, RAM, OS, speed etc. I actually have very very little understanding of the workings and merely use a computer as another tool in my workshop just as I would a plane or a chisel. But as with my planes and chisels etc. I must have them in tip top condition and that's the same with the computer. I want it to be as useful/efficient and fast as possible, hence the questions about what's 'best'.
    So are you saying "I needn't worry and Home Premium -64 bit- will do me ?" Or am I more confused than I thought ?? Between us my wife will need to use all the old 'Word, Publisher & Excel files, which I'm hoping will run with "Office for Mac". I just need Corel Draw and Roland Versaworks, both of which will have to run as Windows programmes, as will Photoshop for the moment as I only have 'In Design' on Windows.

    If you've not lost the will to live by now, I'd very much appreciate your thoughts as to whether my 'thinking' is on the right lines !
     
  15. flatfoot macrumors 65816

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    Aug 11, 2009
    #15
    I was referring to this question:

    By "old XP files", are you referencing the applications Corel Draw and Versaworks or the files you created with them?

    What I meant to say was, if it's about the applications, you should be careful concerning compatibility. If it's about the files, and you want to use them with versions of your applications compatible with Win 7, you needn't worry.

    Re-reading your post, I guess that the former's the case and you'd need that 'XP mode'. But I'm not a Windows specialist and might be wrong.

    Just out of curiosity: Why don't you just install XP? It will work just the same and is less demanding CPU and memory-wise, i. e. it should run faster than Win7. And you won't have to worry about compatibility.

    If you decide to go with Win7 Pro, just get an OEM version, those are way cheaper than the consumer, fancily boxed versions. They are actually meant for system builders (kinda like Dell, for example), but install just the same software.
    Hm, actually, that's true for any version of Windows, also for Home Premium.

    Long story short, if you buy any new Windows disc, just get an OEM version.
     
  16. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2012
    #16
    Hi Flatfoot,
    Thanks for the explanation, it now makes more sense. I was getting mixed up with applications and files !! I know, I told you I only used it as a tool. While it's working I'm happy, when it doesn't I'm lost. However your advice about installing XP makes a lot of sense because after further research with 'Roland' it very much looks like I would need Windows 7 Pro and possibly with the XP Mode option, which of course means more expense. I had enough trouble convincing myself that a Mac was the way to go when the two dominant programmes I use are both Windows only. I'm still hoping the 'machine' itself will outlast any of the four PC's we've got through in twelve years of small business use. I just thought, new computer, new OS, but it seems XP has actually got a lot going for it. Thanks again for your thoughts.
     
  17. ThisIsRuss macrumors newbie

    ThisIsRuss

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    Jul 19, 2010
    Location:
    Shrewsbury, England
    #17
    Retail

    If you buy the retail version which you most likely will it comes with the 64bit and the 32bit versions so its handy but I would go 64bit for both bootcamp and VM use
     
  18. forty2j macrumors 68030

    forty2j

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    Jul 11, 2008
    Location:
    NJ
    #18
    Are you in the EU? The "N" versions of Windows were created in response to an EU anti-trust complaint against Microsoft. This version doesn't come with Windows Media Player. It doesn't save you any money, but if for some reason you wanted a clean install of somebody else's Media Player (iTunes+QuickTime, for example, offer the same functionality) without the possibility of Windows getting in the way, this version is for you.
     
  19. Stebbo47 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    #19
    Yes I am in England. Good to know what the option was. I wouldn't like to think I was missing something that might have been 'better'. Don't think I'll be looking for the N version afterall. Thanks for the info.
     

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