Who has a perfect backup + remote streaming setup?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by cloneofsnake, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. cloneofsnake macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    #1
    My imagined perfect scenario would be:

    1. Multiple Macbooks back up to one network drive
    2. Shared iPhoto / iMovie libraries on network drive
    3. Shared iTunes music / movies libraries on network drive
    4. Internet remote streaming from the network drive to Mac & iOS devices
    5. Secure replication of entire drive to parent's home (duplication of backup data)
    6. Network drive handles bit torrent downloads (nice to have but not required)

    Anyone has something like this (or better!) going? How?! I'm thinking you need to have at least a dedicated Mac mini to do all of these! (As in a Synology / QNAP / Airport Extreme NAS cannot do it.)

    Would be interesting to see a "guide to setting up a perfect backup + remote streaming" thread here.

    -Nick
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    You're asking more then what a typical NAS was designed to do. Often it takes multiple solutions to effect what you're looking for.

    I have a Qnap NAS and that handles my backup, files server and streaming needs. I also use Carbon Copy Cloner to create a backup on a portable disk that I take off site.
     
  3. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    California
    #3
    You can use Crashplan's software, without paying a subscription, to backup to another computer (like your parents) over the Internet. You would need to have the Crashplan software on their computer also.
     
  4. monsieurpaul macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    #4
    - Multiple Macbooks back up to one network drive

    Could be done with a NAS. Do you plan to use Time Machine or another solution (CCC, arrsync, etc.)?

    - Shared iPhoto / iMovie libraries on network drive

    You can't share a iPhoto library between several users, or maybe you can but you shouldn't do it. I am not sure for iMovie, but I wouldn't be surprised.

    - Shared iTunes music / movies libraries on network drive

    Could be done with a NAS with an iTunes server.

    - Internet remote streaming from the network drive to Mac & iOS devices

    I don't uderstand this one.

    - Secure replication of entire drive to parent's home (duplication of backup data)

    Could be done with a NAS with attached USB or eSATA disks.

    - Network drive handles bit torrent downloads (nice to have but not required)

    Could be done with a NAS.
     
  5. AppleDApp, Oct 22, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012

    AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #5
    Has a similar thread been started? I'm looking to do something like this probably using linux or FreeNAS.
     
  6. Lehcim macrumors member

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    Feb 8, 2012
    Location:
    London
    #6
    I'm also very interested in something like this, without using a Mac Mini to achieve it...
     
  7. marzer macrumors 65816

    marzer

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #7
    Absolutely you can share an iPhoto library over the network to mutiple users. I maintain a master iPhoto library on my headless mac mini. Any iPhoto user on the network can see the master and access it as if its on the local machine. Uses Bonjour sharing just like iTunes library sharing.
     
  8. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    My personal advice... based on developing a robust and bullet-proof system.

    1. Never mix backup with primary data storage.
    2. Never share a database that is not designed to be shared (iTunes/iPhoto/Aperture/iMovie) on a central shared resource (ex: NAS). Keep them local to each machine.
    You will find several people who are delighted they have found a way to NOT follow the above device. You will also find MANY people who violate the above advice and end up with lost data, or corrupted databases. My opinion... it is not worth the risk.

    /Jim
     
  9. AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

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    Jun 21, 2011
    #9
    What's your system?
     
  10. flynz4, Oct 22, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012

    flynz4 macrumors 68040

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    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    Backup:
    • Local Backup via Time Machine to Time Capsules
    • Cloud Backup via Crashplan+ to the cloud (every 15 mins), with unlimited versionioning

    File Sharing
    • Dropbox for all files that we would possibly want while mobile across our own accounts
    • Shared dropbox folders for any files we both would want to have access to (very rare)
    • IMAP email syncronization across all computers

    Computer Sharing
    • Login accounts on each other's MBAs... with dropbox synchronization of files, and IMAP email synchronization... this allows either of us to use each other's computers and have our own synchronized personal mobile environment irrespective of which computer we use.

    Database Synchronization & Media Sharing:
    • ITunes: ITunes Match with shared account
    • Photos: Private Aperture 3 (on my iMac) library is repository for 100% of family pictures. Pictures are sorted, rated, tagged, stacked picked, geotagged etc on single computer. Various albums are auto-created using metadata driven "smart albums" and auto shared to home media players. Result... I do 100% of the photo editing... and family members never have to sort though the "crap photos"... and only see fantastic collections of the "selects".
    • Movies: Stored on a home server and streamed to Apple TVs, or manually loaded into iPads by people who want local content (ex: prior to a flight).

    Because the originals of "everything media" lives on my iMac... by definition... 100% of our data is backed up both locally, and to the cloud using CP+. Because all media "lives" in my account... we always know where to find 100% of our data.

    Everyone's computer (both iMacs and MBAs) are automatically backed up local to Time Capsules... and also to the cloud using CP+. Hence... everyone's private data is backed up.

    Because all email uses IMAP email... every computer, iPad, iPhone... always displays the identical view of email state.

    Because I manage all the pictures... the rest of the family only sees the 10's of thousands of great pictures (or pictures with meaning)... instead of 100's of thousands of crap. It is like the difference between visiting a museum... vs looking in your "junk drawer". It can all be streamed to any device in the home... or loaded by others into their own personal computers or iDevices.

    I also put a copy of 100% of the media out on the NAS... just in case anyone wants to sort through all the crap on their own.

    /Jim
     
  11. AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #11

    The perfect example that we don't all have the same needs.
     
  12. flynz4 macrumors 68040

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    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #12
    Of course... we all can create the perfect system for ourselves... and I would not recommend that my solution is best for everyone.

    Still... my basic advice remains... irrespective of individual needs.

    1. Never mix backup with primary data storage.
    2. Never share a database that is not designed to be shared (iTunes/iPhoto/Aperture/iMovie) on a central shared resource (ex: NAS). Keep them local to each machine.

    Violating these principles... often results in disaster. The forums are full of people trying to recover from violating each of the examples above. Proceed at your own risk.

    /Jim
     
  13. marzer macrumors 65816

    marzer

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #13
    Not correct. Both iTunes and iPhotos have the inherent capability to share out over a network. iPhoto uses Bonjour sharing and iTunes uses Home Sharing and Bonjour sharing. Both apps can enable sharing through the application's preference settings.

    Using the built-in sharing features permits multiple users on the same network to access common libraries while keeping things from getting corrupted. I've used these features for years without a problem and would recommend it for anyone who would like an easy solution for providing the whole house with master iTunes or iPhoto libraries.

    As long as you work within the applications inherent features there's no risk at all to sharing iTunes and iPhoto libraries over a network.
     
  14. AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #14
    Any guides as to how to do this?
     
  15. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #15
    Just turn it on in this panel in iTunes preferences. Thing is, your computer will have to be awake all the time for other machines to see this music. Also, other users can only play the music, they cannot add anything to the music library.

    You will find the same setting in iPhoto preferences and it has the same restrictions.

    [​IMG]

    ----------

    That is not what flynz is talking about. He is referring to actually placing the iTunes or iPhoto library on a shared network drive so all users can have full read/write access to it without the host computer running. He is correct that can be dangerous to the data libraries.
     
  16. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #16
    Correct. I see a constant stream of people trying to do this... and claiming success... and then I see people complaining about ending up with corrupted databases, lost media... etc.

    Personally... it is not worth the risk to me. My data is way to important. There are better ways to share data rather than sharing a database... which to my understanding... is not meant to be shared.

    I do use home media sharing... and shared photo collections... but I do not share my database. Keeping the database private to one user/machine remains my recommendation... unless you do not value your data.

    /Jim
     
  17. dmax35 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    #17
    Pretty impressive. Thanks for sharing.
     
  18. WesCole macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #18
    This is almost EXACTLY like my solution that I came up with except that I clone my iMac's drive every night via CCC...the rest is pretty much identical, though...weird. :)
     
  19. wchp, Oct 25, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012

    wchp macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    #19
    Pick a NAS... any NAS...

    Well sort of...
    Synology, Q-Nap, Netgear ReadyNAS, etc.

    Multiple Macbooks back up to one network drive
    - All of the above support time machine
    Shared iPhoto / iMovie libraries on network drive
    - Add on servers or use your primary MAC with iSCSI target on one of the above NAS's
    Shared iTunes music / movies libraries on network drive
    -All of the above support FireFly iTunes server so you are able to access all of your media from ant MAC via iTunes, or an ATV
    Internet remote streaming from the network drive to Mac & iOS devices
    - Media, Data ??? All of the above have some type of remote access solution. Then it is just a matter of your ISPs upstream.
    Secure replication of entire drive to parent's home (duplication of backup data)
    - All of the above will support rsync over SSH
    Network drive handles bit torrent downloads (nice to have but not required)
    - All of the above have built in bit torrent clients

    The Synology has a mail server, router, firewall and a myriad of other functions built in as well. Q-Nap and ReadyNAS are similar either as built in applications or add on apps.

    The Synology and Q-Nap also support iSCSI on most of their units.

    I am currently using a ReadyNAS Pro with 6 2TB drives in raid 6 doing all of the above.
    For customers, I have switched over to synology in the last year. The GUI is just easier to use.
     
  20. SmithErick macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Location:
    Greensboro, NC
    #20
    I use a Synology with two 3TB drives. DS212+ . They are in a Hybrid Raid then I have another 3TB attached to the Synology to backup the Synology. For my main machine I have another 3TB USB 3.0 Drive attached using Carbon Copy Cloner.

    All my media, pictures, documents, etc. gets moved to the Synology and each machine in my house has its own Folder on the Synology to backup specified files/directories.

    It does pretty much everything you requested...

    DS Download App (Torrent Download from iDevice)
    DS File (File Access)
    DS Audio
    DS Video
    DS Photo
    etc.
     
  21. Moshu, Oct 26, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012

    Moshu macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    #21
    One small advice for a "better backup system", as there is no "perfect backup":

    Always have a backup / copy of important files in a different location than where your system is.
    If you want to save data for 50+ years, then you need to be prepared for situations which MIGHT happen once every 50 years (i.e. floods, hurricanes, theft, fire etc)

    And (maybe it seems obvious) never have all the backup copies in the same place, which can be achieved via:
    - internet backup to a different location (i.e. once a week)
    - rotation of two dedicated backup medias (i.e Hard Disks), so that at least one is ALWAYS off site (i.e. HDD1 stays off-site odd weeks, HDD2 the even weeks)

    I personally went for the 2nd solution (2 x USB 3.0 2.5" 1 TB HDDs) + a 3TB network drive connected to my Airport Extreme that never leaves the office, as the amount of data I have is too big to use my crappy upload speed to back-up via internet.

    The 2.5" which happens to be in the office is used for daily back-ups, while the 3TB is used for hourly Time Machine back-ups.

    To sum it up:
    - Current files are on Macs (you could also work on a network drive)
    - Hourly backups via Time Machine on the network's 3TB drive
    - Daily backups on the 1TB drive that's in the office in that week
    - Weekly backup on the 1 TB drive that's off-site

    Worst case scenario: it's really hard to loose more than 1 week work / data, and if somehow this would happen, it would probably be smth so bad that the loss would be the last thing to think of.
     

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