Who knew eMacs make great CD rippers??

kylera

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Dec 5, 2010
1,195
27
Seoul
I'm not quite sure how this works, but right now, I'm ripping all of my CDs before I put them in storage, and I've got a 2011 iMac, PowerBook G4 12" and 1st-gen eMac (700Mhz) all ripping at them. For some reason, the eMac registers the highest ripping speed, consistently above 10X while the other two average around 9X or slightly over.

Either way, I feel productive. :D
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
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The eMac's tray loading desktop class optical drive allows it to spin the disc at speeds up to 48x. While the iMac and Powerbook's slot loading drive only allow for speeds up to 24x.
 
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kylera

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Dec 5, 2010
1,195
27
Seoul
The eMac's tray loading desktop class optical drive allows it to spin the disc at speeds up to 48x. While the iMac and Powerbook's slot loading drive only allow for speeds up to 24x.
Ah, that was quite educational. I suppose this is because of the tray?
 
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Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,886
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Would this be true for DVD ripping too?
While ripping the disc, yes. But transcoding, no. The eMac's G4 is far too slow to transcode a dvd in any reasonable about of time. What you could do is rip the dvd with RipIt, then transfer the resulting folder to an Intell based Mac and use Handbreak to convert it to a playable movie.
 
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ELMI0001

macrumors 6502
Jan 5, 2009
375
6
Olympic Hills GC
While ripping the disc, yes. But transcoding, no. The eMac's G4 is far too slow to transcode a dvd in any reasonable about of time. What you could do is rip the dvd with RipIt, then transfer the resulting folder to an Intell based Mac and use Handbreak to convert it to a playable movie.
Does it take long to transcode than rip? Assuming I'm using the terms correctly. I've only successfully ripped a couple of DVD's but I set it and walk away from it - using Handbrake.
 
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Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,886
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Inside
Ripping is the process in which the data is pulled directly from the disc and not altered, except for removing the anti-copy stuff. Transcoding is the process in which the dvd's .vob files are turned into a computer friendly video format. Transcoding takes a lot of CPU power. I know on my 2.0Ghz C2D iMac, it takes about 2 hours for every 1 hour of the movie. Where ripping takes about 30 to 45 minutes.
 
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0dev

macrumors 68040
Dec 22, 2009
3,947
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127.0.0.1
Why have Apple used slower drives on the new Macs? To make them thinner? :rolleyes:

Either way, any minute now the FBI will be raiding the OP's house for daring to talk about transcoding and ripping, regardless of what country s/he's in ;)
 
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Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,886
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Inside
The slim styled slot loading drives have less robust parts and a smaller overhead for the disc at high speeds. With these two things, the optical disc isn't able to spin fast enough.

Ripping optical media for personal use is legal in the United States.
 
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0dev

macrumors 68040
Dec 22, 2009
3,947
23
127.0.0.1
The slim styled slot loading drives have less robust parts and a smaller overhead for the disc at high speeds. With these two things, the optical disc isn't able to spin fast enough.
So they really are sacrificing functionality for the sake of "make it thin!"

Ripping optical media for personal use is legal in the United States.
I know, just a (rubbish) joke :p
 
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zen.state

macrumors 68020
Mar 13, 2005
2,181
5
Unless video ripping is involved in the burn then the computer has zero to do with how fast a disk will burn. It's 100% on the burner how fast it will be.
 
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