iPad Pro Who would use *that* ??

Discussion in 'iPad' started by TorontoJen, May 23, 2016.

  1. TorontoJen macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2016
    #1
    When I was researching The 12.9 iPad Pro, it struck me funny that reviewers seem to always wonder who a device like this is for, other than an artist or a note-taking student, because you can't get any "real" work done on it.

    I am guessing that's because most reviewers associate "real" work with video capabilities and photography work.

    I think this device opens up a productivity door for *plenty* of different professions. Lawyers, doctors, salespeople, teachers, editors and writers. The list goes on for its varied uses.

    I write full-time, and until the Pro, I struggled with a few different issues. Weight being one of them.

    I have a MacBook Pro, and while it's my go-to machine, it's a wee bit too heavy for someone like me (with neck issues) to throw in my knapsack and head to the coffee shop. Still, I wanted more than another light computing device. I needed a way to bring all of my work together. The Pro does this for me, and is also light enough to toss in my bag and head out for the day. And the screen size is perfect for me.

    Now, I put all of my story notes, character sketches, plot ideas and story bibles in Notability. Sometimes writing things out by hand jogs the brain and gets me unstuck.

    Another good thing about the Pro is that I now don't have random lost pieces of paper or half-used notebooks abandoned around the house. It syncs with Notability on my MacBook and everything is there.

    Also, I used to use Scrivener (which I still adore), but now I can use Ulysses natively across my laptop, as well as on the iPad while on the go.

    I can annotate a PDF and split screen to make the changes in my manuscripts.

    It's made my life so much easier in so many ways.

    Many people also argue about it not being as effective as the Surface or Surface Pro devices. I am not anti-Windows, but I have a SP3 and it has not fit the bill in my case. It runs extremely hot and the fan never turns off. OneNote never syncs properly for me to use effectively, and that's a shame because it's a fantastic program.
    The pen is really nice, but the device got so warm it was uncomfortable even putting my hand on the screen.

    I hope the SP4's have improved, because I see the potential, especially for those primarily in a Windows environment. But for me, being a Mac girl, I struggled.

    I just hope they continue making the 12.9 Pro. I think it's a great device and just because it may not be a "laptop replacement" for everyone doesn't mean it isn't a great, useful companion device.
     
  2. bensisko macrumors 65816

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    #2
    Thanks for sharing your use-case! I love hearing different and unique ways people are using iPads - especially those that are using it for more than "media consumption" devices!

    I'd agree - I think people who are thinking about not being able to get "real work" done are thinking about their specific uses and biases. It's a great machine and there's plenty of "real work" that you can do on it (even including Photography and Video Editing).

    Many (but certainly not all) of the cases against the iPad Pro come down to preference vs. being a technical issue.
     
  3. joeblow7777 macrumors 601

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    Sep 7, 2010
    #3
    I feel that's it's simply too pricey to just be a "companion device". I have a Dell XPS 13 ultrabook: 5th gen core-i5 processor, 8 GB of RAM, 256 GB SSD, QHD touchscreen, obviously running full Windows. It cost me about $1300 CDN.

    A 256 GB 12.9" iPP costs more than that (even without the keyboard accessory), and for me, doesn't match the functionality of a full Windows PC. A Surface Pro at least could do everything that my XPS 13 does, but I still feel that a laptop makes the best laptop.

    I don't mean to criticize the iPP as I'm sure it's a great device for many people, but I can understand why it seems too limited and overpriced for many.
     
  4. TorontoJen thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 17, 2016
    #4
    I live in Toronto and trust me, I know what you mean about the price. Blah. It's painful!

    It was a business expense for me, so I could justify the purchase as I had very specific needs I wanted it to meet, and a smaller, lighter laptop wasn't going to cut it.

    If someone is like me and is looking for a device that is going to plug a few essential gaps, and they have the money to spend, it's a good investment. For me personally, I couldn't justify the cost of the Pro as a media consumption tool only. Especially when I already have an older iPad that fits that bill.
     
  5. Meever macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 30, 2009
    #5
    If you're only doing writing and light annotating it's a fantastic machine. But for vast majority of people it can't serve as a primary work device due to the cumbersome nature of iOS and compatibility issues.

    Doesn't play nice with our network, I can't access to files on our servers, Safari doesn't like any of our webapps, etc, etc.

    Anytime you want to get anything outside writing done you need to juggle through multiple apps and the whole process is needlessly complicated.
     
  6. Abazigal macrumors 604

    Abazigal

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    Jul 18, 2011
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    Singapore
    #6
    Congrats on finding a device that works great for you.

    The irony of people claiming that the iPad cannot be used for real work is that they are blatantly claiming all this in the face of people actually using them meaningfully for real work in their everyday lives.

    Hope the iPad continues to form an integral part of your workflow.
     
  7. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #7
    Fully agreed. Swapped from iPad Air 2 to 12.9" iPP yesterday. It rocks.
     
  8. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #8
    I am far more than a "casual user" of computers, and I'm doing all kinds of "pro" stuff on my iPad Pro. People have been conditioned to believe that tablets are only for consumption, and that's just simply not true anymore. The processors in these things are insane, and there are some productivity work flows in my life that are EASIER on the iPad Pro than they ever were on the Mac. And yes, some things are still a bit more complicated too, but they're getting easier with each tweak to the OS/apps.

    I will admit though, I didn't use my past iPads for much more than consumption. For me, the huge difference maker on the iPad Pro is the smart connector/keyboard cover as well as the Pencil. Those two additions to the iPad have opened up whole new worlds of use cases for me.
     
  9. maxsix Suspended

    maxsix

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    #9
    An iPad is a computer.

    It's the form factor that makes it unappealing for my preferences. If I'm going to use a device larger than a smartphone for work I choose a MacBook / MacBook Pro.

    Oh sure I do own each of the iPad sizes but they're for casual content consumption, nothing more. Even with Apple's keyboard and pencil, my iPad Pro just isn't compelling. Too bulky, too awkward, it's just a big slab of aluminum.

    MacBooks do the job so much faster. Nothing like it.
     
  10. TorontoJen thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 17, 2016
    #10
    It depends on the job and the person, I think. It depends on the workflow that works for you, personally, as an individual. For you, that solution is a MacBook.

    In my case, the IPP used in conjunction is faster. My workflow before was a scattered mess.

    I agree that before this, most people probably used the iPad as strictly a consumption device. My iPad Air is mostly consumption. My Pro is all work.

    I don't think it's going to replace a computer for many people. Maybe those who only use a computer for entertainment. But I think some people like me will be able to use it for a good portion of their workflow.

    Thankfully we have choices.
     
  11. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #11
    The only thing I am now using a full blown laptop for is when I have to host work-related teleconferences that require me to share my screen. For literally everything else I do, including teleconferences that DON'T require me to share my screen, I'm doing them on my iPad Pro. A few months ago, I didn't think this was going to be the case any time soon, but here I am, using my iPad Pro as a computer. There are really only two things I have left on my wish list for iOS/iPad at this point--I wish there was a way to connect it to dual external monitors that don't support AirPlay, and I want to be able to decide what apps show up in my slide over menu so I don't have to hunt through so many all the time.
     
  12. Channan macrumors 68030

    Channan

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    New Orleans
    #12
    Every time I go to a store that has an iPad Pro 12.9 on display, I go check it out. I swear they look bigger every time I see them.

    I know there are some people that just love the size, and I'm sure I'd probably get used to it, but I already struggle deciding between the portability of the mini and the extra space of the Air.

    If I ever did buy a Pro 12.9 though, it would be for all that RAM.
     
  13. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #13
    I don't love the 12.9" sized iPP as a tablet. I definitely knew that was not for me when they launched it. The 9.7" was too much for me to resist though.
     
  14. Night Spring macrumors G5

    Night Spring

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    #14
    When I first saw the 12.9 Pro, I did wonder if the size would be a problem. Well, for me, the SIZE hasn't been a problem. It's about the size of an A4 notebook, which I'm sure we've all carried around with us from time to time. What can be a bit of a problem is the WEIGHT. if the size stayed the same and the weight came down to about the same as the iPad Air, I think it'd be much easier to handle.
     
  15. Channan macrumors 68030

    Channan

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    #15
    Yes, definitely. It's comparable to the original iPad, but being even larger makes it feel much heavier than the original iPad.
     
  16. rui no onna macrumors 601

    rui no onna

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    Oct 25, 2013
    #16
    Honestly, all my laptops are around US $650 or less. The only thing that puts them in the same price range as top of the line iPads are the aftermarket upgrades (16GB RAM, 256-512GB mSATA/M.2 + 1TB 2.5" SSD). Given how much use I derive from the iPad, the price hasn't really bothered me. It's all about priorities I guess. Some people like cars and don't mind having $1000/mo car payments. Some like designer wear and jewelry. I'd rather have tech. :)

    Mind, between getting the latest tech and business class seats on a 12+ hr flight, the business class seats win. :p
     
  17. rowspaxe, May 24, 2016
    Last edited: May 24, 2016

    rowspaxe macrumors 68000

    rowspaxe

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    #17
    I have used all versions of the Surface Pro with oneNote without issues Your likely sincere but your experience is extra ordinary
     
  18. M. Gustave macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #18
    You hear the exact same talking points over and over and over again: "iPad can't replace a laptop", "consumption device", "can't do real work", "toy"...

    It's so tiring and boring dealing with these ignorati. iPad already has "replaced a laptop" for many many people, including myself. I keep a dusty Lenovo in a drawer somewhere, haven't touched it in months. And I only have an iPad Air (1st gen)... can't imagine how great a Pro would be.

    What I had seen as limitations of the device or iOS a year ago, in fact turned out to be my own lack of knowledge about iOS, and my own outdated legacy modes of working and interfacing with computers.

    It's not one size fits all, but people without specialized fringe use cases can easily go "iPad only".
     
  19. Franco Borgo macrumors newbie

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    Mar 24, 2010
    #19
    One question, in what position do you use your iPad. Do it rest on the table, is it on a Dock/Support, or your lap or others.

    I use my iPad mini, alway holding it, but for long period of work, i use the MacBook.
     
  20. Night Spring macrumors G5

    Night Spring

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    #20
    I usually sit on the bed or sofa with my knees up, and rest the iPad on my lap.
     
  21. bensisko macrumors 65816

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    #21
    Depends on the work. If it involves typing I use the Smart Keyboard on my lap or on a flat surface (sometimes desk other times whatever flat surface I can find around.

    Most other work I either hold it or have it resting on my lap.
    --- Post Merged, May 25, 2016 ---
    Not too extraordinary. My Surface Pro 3 also had those issues - especially when using OneNote for long periods with the stylus. They weren't constant, but they did happen. The worst part was Windows dumping my entire OneNote notebook after a crash! Good thing I had cloud sync turned on.

    I used to take my SP3 to conferences to take notes, but the heat issue and the OneNote reliability was enough for me to switch fully to the iPad Pro once it came out. Haven't looked back!
     
  22. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

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    #22
    Yep. Always makes me laugh when an Android user on the latest version of Chocolate Biscuit (or whatever the crumb their latest OS is called), laugh at the "iToys" that "aren't used for real work", yet all they do is use their equivalent-priced device to customise icons and add new widgets.
     
  23. bensisko macrumors 65816

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    #23
    And if that makes them happy, all the more power to them! :)
     
  24. M. Gustave macrumors 68000

    M. Gustave

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    #24
    Someone who joins an Apple forum just to trash their products is probably not a happy person.
     
  25. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

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    #25
    "Vast majority?" Some people love to be part of a majority, others part of a minority. In either case, they project that their desires and situation on others... "This is true for me, therefore it's true for the vast majority."

    I'm another who quit needing a work laptop due to iPad. In 2010. I've written similar posts to the first in this thread, many times.

    Still, I agree that iPad can't replace a laptop for many laptop users. However, in many cases, that isn't a permanent situation. The compatibility issues cited above could go away in short order if the person's employer was motivated to do so. App and workflow redesign can address other issues. Hardware power keeps increasing. Until that happens, nothing changes for the person facing those challenges. But when it changes, it changes in a flash.

    I saw this happen with PCs, as well. It's not like they arrived on every desktop in an office instantaneously. In the 12 years I worked at one big-city radio station... When I arrived there were two computers, in the hands of the accounting department. Then the traffic department (commercial scheduling) got a few. "Networking" consisted of shared serial printers with A/B switches. Secretaries/assistants had dedicated word processors; they were the next to get PCs - not networked. Then the programming department got one computer (and then a second on a peer-to-peer network) for managing the record library and creating playlists. After about ten years of creeping introduction of desktops, Corporate decided its "executives" needed laptops (and the entire organization needed a proper network), in part so the bosses could exchange management-only email... (oh, the disruption when Mr. "Take a letter, Miss Jones" was forced to find his way around a keyboard!). The ad sales reps finally got them, too - finally, they could slice and dice ratings and demographics data for sales pitches. During that period, software, hardware, and operating systems kept evolving, with new enabling technologies arriving on a regular basis.

    Another key factor to mobile devices is that it's not so much about switching current computer users to mobile (though that does happen); it's also about extending computer use to those who didn't have them, or had trouble using the ones they had. People like sales clerks, restaurant servers, and healthcare workers who typically have to walk back and forth to some sort of work station to process transactions, or who had yet to transition to electronic systems at all. Tablets to replace clipboards, etc.

    The fact of the matter is, smartphones and tablets are "personal computers" in a far more intimate way than desktops and laptops can be - in a short period they've come to outnumber conventional PCs by a substantial margin. To think that this trend does not extend to business computing is shortsighted, to say the least. Per-worker cost is so much lower than the cost for desktop/laptops that further penetration is inevitable.
     

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