Who's tapping?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by C64, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. C64 macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #1
    So.. how do you know whom a tap is from?

    Let's say you agree that three taps means lunch with a specific colleague. What happens when someone else sends you three taps? Every time you get a tap notification from someone you need to look at your watch to see who sent it, and then remember what it meant for that person.

    The more people you use this with, the harder it gets to agree upon unique taps for that particular person and occasion. Saying "oh no, we can't use three taps, because I'm already using that with someone else" only works so many times.

    And what's stopping people from annoying you with constant tapping? Kind of like being stuck in a pre-iOS8 iMessage group chat you can't get out of.
     
  2. FatMax macrumors 6502

    FatMax

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    #2
    You´ll find your answer…if you read the technology page on Apple´s Watch page...
     
  3. C64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #3
    No, that's my I'm asking.

    Doesn't really answers my questions.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #4
    What about their name at the bottom of the screen? Is this what you are asking?

    Also if concerned about 'strange' taps I'm sure you can block them somehow.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. C64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #5
    But that requires you to look at the watch. I'm not sure what the order is in which these things are received. I assume that you feel the taps someone sends you, and then you need to look at it to know whom it's from, so you can figure out what the taps mean.

    Example:

    1. I feel three taps on my wrist. I can't make any assumptions, because it could be from anyone, meaning anything.
    2. I need to look at the watch to see the name (and colour);
    3. I need to remember what these specific taps (in a specific colour) mean for this person.

    It could also be that you get a default notification first, set to whatever you want, and only if you "open" it, it starts tapping the message from your contact. But that seems a bit too complicated, and still doesn't solve point 3.
     
  6. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #6
    Then you could have your friends agree a tap code to identify each person.
     
  7. Tar Sniffer macrumors 6502

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    Apr 11, 2012
    #7
    Tapping, sketches and tacky animated emojis seems to be the most pointless form of communication.
     
  8. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    #8
    It seems to be a HUGE cultural thing in east Asia. Since China/Japan/Korea are such huge markets this makes it relevant. Apple may see it becoming more of a new 'thing' with western youth too. However like you it's not something I see myself using, but never say never.
     
  9. ditzy macrumors 68000

    ditzy

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    #9
    Yes you'll have to look at the watch, but as it's on your wrist, that shouldn't be too much of a hardship.
     
  10. FatMax macrumors 6502

    FatMax

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    #10

    See? On the iPhone you can have custom vibrations for every contact if you so choose...

    Also, from their Features page:

     
  11. C64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #11
    I read the text, but you're removing the context. Here's the full quote:

    This implies that receiving an alert or notification is a kind of interaction, and thus has a recognizably different tactile sensation from other kinds of interactions. Ok, that makes sense. However, that doesn't tell you anything about how you perceive tabs from other people.

    Like I said before, I don't know if you first receive a notification from the watch, tell you someone has a tap-message for you, or that you directly receive that tap-message without any standard pre-announcement. The latter seems more logical to me and it's also implied in the keynote and on the site, so that's what I'm assuming.

    But let's split it up for arguments sake, and think through both scenarios:

    1. You receive a (customisable) notification from the watch, telling you someone has sent you a tap-message. You look at the watch, accept the tap-message, see the sender's name, see the color and feel the tap-message, and interpret its meaning.

    2. You directly receive a tap-message from someone. You feel a certain tap-message, but it could be from anyone. So to find out you look at the watch after receiving the tap-message, see the sender's name, see the color, need to remember the tap-message, and interpret its meaning.

    Both aren't ideal, and both bring up some problems I mentioned earlier. Taps aren't a very broad language. Unless you know morse code, it's very difficult to remember a wide range of different messages. Also, simpel tap-messages are pretty much all the same.

    So regardless of how you receive the message (scenario 1 or 2), you still need to remember what "three taps" mean for person A, if you're also using it with person B. You simply cannot use unique tap counts for each contact because a) you probably have more than a few and b) you don't control how many contacts your contacts have. Maybe you want to use "three taps" with person A, but they might already use "three taps" with person C.

    The more people you know with an Apple Watch, and the more people they know, the harder it gets to find tap combinations that both contacts only use with each other.

    As for my original question: who's tapping? This only applies to scenario 2: you receive the tap-message from your contact directly, not after a notification that there is a tap-message. That would create even more confusion, because you simply can't think "oh three taps, that means lunch with person A", because it might also mean "bring milk when you get home" sent by person B. Or it might be person C who's just tapping away and it didn't mean anything specific.

    Bottom line: if you feel taps, you need to look at your watch to see the name, color and then figure out what the heck it meant for this particular person. So that pretty much means that it's great to use with 1 or 2 people, if those people also only use it with you and one other person, and it's great for demo/keynote purposes, but when you use it with larger groups of friends it can get very confusing to use any of these tap-messages.

    This doesn't tell us much definitively, but it implies that this is scenario 2: you feel the tap-message directly on your wrist.

    But I don't know what "You can even customize taps for different people" means. You assume it means that you can create custom tap-feelings, just like you can create custom vibration alerts for your contacts on the iPhone. But that seems like a very hard thing to accomplish. Vibrations are created by the device itself, and can thus be very specific. How different can "gentle taps" on your wrist be?

    If someone sends me three taps, how many different ways are there to let me feel those three taps? They're just taps taps. It's not a combination of 500 rapid vibrations in a few seconds and in very specific bursts. That's a huge difference. I think you run out of ways to do different "gentle taps" very quickly (gentle, very gentle, not so gentle), and definitely can't do this for that many contacts.

    I think that "You can even customize taps for different people" doesn't have anything to do with that you, the receiver, can customise some kind of tap-feeling, but that it's about you, the sender, who can choose different colors as depicted on the image above the text and demoed in the keynote. This also matches with the beginning of the text "Let friends or loved ones know". They're talking about sending taps.

    The only thing I can think of is that the sender can tap on certain area's on the screen, so that the receiver also feels the taps on those area's. They mentioned something about the walking direction having taps on different areas to indicate left and right, so that's plausible. But the taptic engine part is smaller than the screen and round, so there isn't a 1:1 correlation between where you tap on the screen and where you feel it on your wrist. And I imagine that it's even harder to differentiate and remember where those taps were exactly as it is to remember what those taps mean from this particular sender. And it would be hard for the sender to always tap exactly in the right spot so that the tap is translated correctly by the receiver, and doesn't suddenly mean something else. All this seems way too complicated.
     
  12. iBreatheApple macrumors 68030

    iBreatheApple

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    #12
    What exactly do you want them to do then? I want to know when the red light turns green without having to look up but it just work that way.
     
  13. C64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #13
    I don't expect Apple to send signals directly to my brain, I'm just asking a question about functionality displayed during the Keynote.
     
  14. FatMax macrumors 6502

    FatMax

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    #14
    To be honest, I think you are over-complicating it massively. Granted, we won't know until someone has it for review..

    That's a very lengthy response and I apologise for not answering you as broadly right now.

    I think you should play with the vibration notification on iPhone to better understand what I mean:

    On your iPhone, go to Settings:

    Sounds -> Ringtone

    Scroll to the very top. Tap on vibration, scroll down to User Defines and Make new vibration.

    Now I might be imaging this, but a similar feature will exist for the Warch I'm sure.

    Today I have about 12 different homemade vibrations for 12 different people. When my phone is on silent in my pocket, I imediately know who's calling or texting.

    ----------

    Would be awesome though.. ;)
     
  15. C64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    C64

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    #15
    Probably. It's likely that it's just a nice thing to demo: "oh, I use three taps for lunch!" but that IRL it's way less useful and you get into all these problems. But that would still be a shame though. One of the key elements of this Apple Watch is "intimate" communication, so I'd expect that when they present one of these primary ways of communicating, tapping, it's well thought-out.

    Those are very useful indeed, but in this case you're essentially the one who's tapping out the message. You can create combinations of long and short bursts of vibrations, creating your own "message" for each contact.

    In case of receiving tap-messages on the watch though, you're not in control of how many taps there are or how fast they succeed each other. You're the receiver. And how many ways are there to translate a single tap into a physical tap using this taptic engine? I'm guessing just force, but that's not a whole lot.

    A tap is a tap. Three taps are three taps. It's not like these taps are represented by a specific vibration sequence that lasts as long as it takes for you to answer a call.

    True. Maybe they'll add in a future generation, the Apple Watch 3Gs Air Plus BrainWave.
     
  16. FatMax macrumors 6502

    FatMax

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    #16
    Seeing as they made a big deal about their Taptic engine AND Force Touch, I bet it's quite translatable and distinguishable when you receive these taps.

    What I believe is this:

    Someone send you a tap/text/emoji/....

    Seeing as these are all form of communication, you will get a notification first. You have to act on that notification to get the message. That notification could be a standard vibration or a user defined one depending on who it is from. That lets you know if it is important for you to interact or not.

    When you open the notification you get whatever taps the person sent, in the app, with the graphic UI for the taps (and sound if on) leaving you ready to respond right away.

    If you wait, it's there as an unanswered message/notification until it's opened.

    Just my 2 cents anyway..
     
  17. Wishbrah macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2013
    #17
    Just a guess: you will instantly receive the tapping, with a name. You will also get a notification that it happened, and will be able to replay it (whether or not you can save for later reference - who knows).
     

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