Whose display should I buy for editing?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Cloud9, Sep 19, 2007.

  1. Cloud9 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2005
    Location:
    between flesh and thought
    #1
    Hello,

    I need a couple pointers on a display for editing wedding photos. First, ACD is not happening. No $$$ for it.

    I want to get a 24" inch display. I hear great things about Dell's displays, but notice that other manufacturers make 24"s for less then dell. I would like to keep my cost under $600 and so I have been watching the dell refurb page but it's been a little dry lately. I would go with another manufacturer if people have had good experiences to tell about.

    Thanks.
     
  2. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #2
    First read this....
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TFT_LCD

    The ACD is a Philips IPS panel. Dell used to use the same panel but now they've gone with multiple supliers soit's hard to know what you will get.

    look here next
    http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/panelsearch.htm
    (this link is on the wiki page)
    It will tell you what panels are in which monitors.

    One more thing.... If you don't use a hardware calibration device all this is moot, if it's uncalibrated you may as well not bother trying to correct the color.

    I use the Spyder2 device but others find the Eye1Display@ to work as well. If you get the Spyder the only differenc between the three models is the software. same gadget. So the lowest price model is good enough
     
  3. Veritas&Equitas macrumors 68000

    Veritas&Equitas

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Location:
    Twin Cities, MN
    #3
    Yeah, except Apple continues to use the older model of IPS panels, whereas Dell has moved on to the newer models, with only some the same as Apple. Apple should be shot for not releasing ACD updates in the past 37 years.
     
  4. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #4
    If you don't have the money for a good LCD display and calibration, go with a CRT monitor with a Triniton tube.
     
  5. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #5
    First of all, add $65 for a color calibration tool to the price of the monitor, no matter which one you get. Otherwise, the discussion on `good display for image editing' doesn't really mean much.

    I find 24" screens to be markedly more expensive than, say, 22" displays. I'd rather get a good 22" display than a bad 24" display. I'm quite fond of Samsung displays ...
     
  6. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #6
    Samsung has a new 24 inch, 1920x1200 display out that I've seen lately in my part of the U.S.A. and I think I'd rather have it than their current batch of lower density 22 inch displays at 1680x1050.

    I'd think that they need to be more frequently calibrated than the Apple displays. I'm not all that trusting, though.
     
  7. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #7
    For me, it's not as important how often you calibrate, but that you calibrate your display when you want one that is `good' for image editing.
     
  8. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #8
    So, all that talk about the colour changing over time has no truth to it?
     
  9. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #9
    Eeeeh, no, that's not what I've said.
    I said that calibrating (no matter how often) is preferable to not calibrating at all -- especially when you edit images.

    (I'm trying to point out that it should be mandatory to buy a color calibration tool if you want to have a display that's suitable for editing images. Once you have such a tool, be it a Huey or a Color Spyder (which is what I have), you can calibrate as often as you'd like.)
     
  10. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #10
    It's easy to see if your display calibration changes with time and how fast it changes. The calibration file is just some numbers in a short file that you can read. Rename the file, run the calibration then compare the old and new files. If they are very close then the monitor did not change. My (old style, white) 24" 2.16Ghz iMac screen is pretty stable. If you don't like reading numbers I think Apple's Colorsync utility can make some plots.

    Actually calibrating my display was kind of disappointing because the default Apple supplied file was very close to what the Spyder2 colorimeter found. So there was not much change. I think the panels in the older iMacs where pretty good.
     

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