All iPads Why aren't iPad screens called Retina HD?

Discussion in 'iPad' started by bniu, Dec 10, 2014.

  1. bniu macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    #1
    iPad resolution is 2048x1536, 50% more pixels than 6 plus and about triple the 6's pixels. With iPad having a resolution way beyond HD, why aren't they marketed as HD?
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    Because they don't fit into Apple's equation as having the required pixel density coupled with the average view length needed for that label.
     
  3. Lloydbm41 macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2013
    Location:
    Central California
    #3
    Resolution isn't what makes a display 'retina' or not, it is the pixel density number that Apple uses for that moniker. 326ppi is the minimum number Apple has used for the term 'retina'. I have included a table below showing which Apple devices make the cut. I have also added in the similar Nexus 9 (aspect ratio, similar size and display type) to show that it doesn't reach the criteria either.

    401 PPI: iPhone 6 Plus
    326 PPI: iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, iPod Touch (4th/5th gen), iPad Mini 2, and iPad Mini 3
    281 PPI: Nexus 9
    264 PPI: iPad (3rd/4th gen), iPad Air, and iPad Air 2
    227 PPI: MacBook Pro (3rd generation) 13"
     
  4. Doomtomb macrumors regular

    Doomtomb

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    #4
    You're half right. It's the pixel density for a given viewing distance makes the display 'Retina' or not. If you re-watch the iPhone 4 keynote, it's quite clear the definition. All of those devices you listed, except this Nexus 9, has been referred to by Apple as including a "Retina" display. Starting with the iPad 3, it was referred to as the iPad with "Retina" display. And if you go to their website, the Macbook Pro Retina, is called such on almost every page.

    So I don't know what you're getting at with this magic "326" ppi number, it's clearly defined as average viewing distance per pixel density. It goes by device category.

    What the OP is asking is why they aren't called "HD" and I think the reason is to differentiate the screen quality on both the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. It may be because the 6+ is the first to reach over 400 PPI but it's more likely just for market differentiation and because it is equivalent to an HD television, 1080p. And yes, Apple is not the first to do this on a phone, lol.
     
  5. mattopotamus macrumors G4

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #5
    it actually probably has to do with the 6+ being 1920 x 1080 which is considered full HD in the TV world.
     
  6. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Location:
    Rialto, CA
    #6
    All my devices except for my iMac is retina. I don't care who does it, including apple, it makes no difference during daily use making pointlessly denser displays. My 6 Plus doesn't feel any sharper than my old 5, the only difference it makes is that its noticeably more difficult to look closely at the display and try to see the individual pixels.
     
  7. Doomtomb macrumors regular

    Doomtomb

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    #7
    Isn't that what I said?
     
  8. mattopotamus macrumors G4

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #8
    haha you did. I must have just stopped reading or something. I think I got caught up in the PPI talk.
     
  9. Doomtomb macrumors regular

    Doomtomb

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    #9
    lol np. I get wordy sometimes
     
  10. joeblow7777 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    #10
    They're all just marketing terms anyway.
     
  11. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #11
    Agreed, what it is called matters very little.
     

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