Why does a watch have to have a color display?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by MNealBarrett, Sep 9, 2014.

  1. MNealBarrett, Sep 9, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2014

    MNealBarrett macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    #1
    I'd like to have a serious discussion about that. Unless you are Shaquille O'Neal, there are limits to how big a watch can be and still fit on your wrist. So, the vast majority of the uses of a smartphone won't apply to a smartwatch. You won't be using it to play games, view pictures or do web browsing, for example. So why does it have to have a color display?

    Apple isn't the only company getting this wrong, IMO. Samsung and Motorola also introduced color smartwatches, which have the same problems; no always-on display, no readability while wearing sunglasses, etc.

    I would like to see Apple introduce a slightly less expensive version with most of the same features, but with an always-on B&W display.
     
  2. MNealBarrett thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
  3. The Doctor11 macrumors 603

    The Doctor11

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    Location:
    New York
    #3
    *Facepalm*
    Have you seen the keynote? You can veiw pictures. There will be third party apps also. And it ****ing looks nice!!!!!
     
  4. mtmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    #4
    Maybe just the red LED look from the 70's? The display cost on something like this has got to be so cheap, the little more for a full color display would appeal to so many more people. At some point, I would expect to see a kindle like display that is easier to read in the day. Look at the tablet market vs. the e-reader market. So while there may be a market for a monochrome smart watch, even the market for a color smart watch is too small already.
     
  5. ctdonath macrumors 65816

    ctdonath

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    #5
    You need color precisely because it IS such a small display: one pixel can express more information via color than a B/W or gray pixel, increasing the data density. And by "more" I mean "a LOT more", and not just by straight count (2^24 > 2^8), but by human contextual association as well.
     

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