Why does my out of the box 1tb ExHD have less space

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by Amnak, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. Amnak macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    #1
    So i took the plunge and bought a 1TB external HD but my mac says it only has 930 GBs. I'm assuming it's the crappy installed software thats on the thing. It says i can't delete it but I'm sure you can. Basically help :D
     
  2. kernkraft macrumors 68020

    kernkraft

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    #2
    Beacause of the term 'formatted'. It's not the crappy software.
     
  3. DARKJ3DI macrumors regular

    DARKJ3DI

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Location:
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    #3
    if you're using a mac with snow leopard it will show up as exactly 1000GB but an older mac or any pc will show it as 930GB. snow leopard used base ten rounding while the older macs and pcs use 2^X rounding which not what the hard drive makers use.
     
  4. Amnak thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    #4
    Ok so I do have 1000gb? then how in the world do i get the folder off? I'm worried that if I format I won't get the space back. For example when i formatted my 8gb flash drive with out taking files off it left me with 7 something gbs.
     
  5. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #5
    You have 1000 GB, or 930 GiB. Your machine is reporting your GiB count, which manufacturers wrongly label GB. There is nothing wrong with your drive.
     
  6. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #6
    to add a little more english

    GiB - uses the computer based binary, so based on units of 1024 Bytes

    GB - uses base 10 math (what you you normally use), so numbers are based on units of 1000 Bytes

    1 TB
    based on GB = 1,000,000,000,000 Bytes
    based on Gib = 1,099,511,627,776 Bytes

    Manufacturers typically uses the Base 10 number because they appear larger

    but computers, based on binary use GiB, which give you a smaller number.

    It's basically been this way for years
     

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