Why does the Apple app store not support Mac computers running a OS before OS X 10.10

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Bubble99, May 5, 2017.

  1. Bubble99 macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #1
    Why does the Apple app store not support Mac computers running a OS before OS X 10.10 ? Yea the apps running OS X 10.6 or OS X 10.7 or even OS X 10.8 yes even 10.9

    I know lots of people still running OS before 10.10

    The OS core cannot be that much different to cause compatibility issue.
     
  2. Mr_Brightside_@ macrumors 68020

    Mr_Brightside_@

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    #2
    Can you elaborate?

    The Mac App Store works swimmingly on my office's Mini that runs 10.7
     
  3. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #3
    I'm talking about the system requirements posting before you download the app.

    Apple or the developer posting the system requirements posting for the app.

    If the app will work or not I'm not sure.
     
  4. Eric5h5 macrumors 68020

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    Dec 9, 2004
    #5
    The system requirements are the system requirements. If a developer says 10.10, then that's what it requires; this has nothing to do with the app store in any way. I randomly poked around on the store for a minute and found some apps that support 10.9, so they exist, but really not many people are still using that (less than 15% in 2015 and presumably quite a bit lower by now). And yes, the OS core is that different to cause compatibility issues. If a programmer uses a feature that only exists in 10.10 and later, then you cannot run it on 10.9 or earlier. It's that simple.

    --Eric
     
  5. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #6
    Yea it strange that iOS show app versions but not for Mac apps.

    There lots of apps I seen for OS X 10.6 , OS X 10.7 and OS X 10.8 !! Than they updated the app and now say 10.10 !! Yet there no drop down menu to roll back to the app before it was updated!!

    Example a friend of mine is running OS X 10.8 like to have app EverNotes and ‪iStudiez‬ but system requirements say 10.10 !! Yet I had EverNotes and ‪iStudiez‬ when I was running OS X 10.8 than they updated the app and now say system requirements say 10.10 !!

    So if you had EverNotes and ‪iStudiez‬ before the app was updated you are okay but now they updated EverNotes and ‪iStudiez‬ it say system requirements say 10.10 !!

    No drop down menu to roll back to the app before the update.

    Yea really strange.
    --- Post Merged, May 6, 2017 ---
    I know number of people running OS even before OS X 10.6!! So I don't know where 15% come from. Some of these computer are 10 to 15 years old and still working.
    --- Post Merged, May 6, 2017 ---
    It also sad Apple wants you to get new Mac computer every two or three year than update or roll back compatibility mode.
     
  6. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    Between the coasts
    #7
    Both Apple and the developers have a vested interest in supporting as few versions of an OS and an app as possible. They also have a vested interest in keeping their product fresh - it's a competitive world.

    So, what happens if a developer brings out a new version every year, with new features that were enabled by the latest version of the OS? Do they keep selling every version, and leave it to the customer to decide which version is right for them? Does the App Store automatically deliver the correct version (or hide incompatible products), based on the version of the OS the customer is running? If incompatible versions are hidden, the potential customer doesn't know what benefits they may gain by upgrading the OS. What if the customer reads the description for the latest version, with all sorts of exciting new features, but is given the older version that's compatible with their OS? "I want a refund!" Does the developer keep patching bugs and security holes in those older versions for as long as they're offered for sale, or do they slap a big "sold as-is" banner on it?

    I've seen a few App Store developers that do keep their older versions on sale, at lower prices. It's pretty confusing, if you ask me, and I can't help but wonder how many purchasers of the bargain, older version end up paying again to get the newest version, with all the improvements.
     
  7. Eric5h5 macrumors 68020

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    Dec 9, 2004
    #8
    The number comes from looking at the market as a whole, not just "people you know". It turns out that there are billions of people on the planet, and you know but the tiniest of tiny fractions. In my case, I don't know anyone running anything earlier than 10.9, but I'm not going to claim that nobody at all runs anything earlier, because "people I know" does not reflect the entire market.

    --Eric
     
  8. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #9
    I would suspect Apple at least would support OS at least 5 years old. A 5 years old is not that long ago.

    If Apple only supports some thing no more than three years old Apple is leaching on people.

    Well surely OS cannot change that much in that small time frame. Microsoft would never do this. And Microsoft is known like Android to support OS 5 to 10 years old. Even Linux support many different Linux distro and version.

    There still lots of software made for windows 7 that came out in 2009. It seems to be move by Apple to make OS and hardware old fast.

    And we wonder why Mac computers are not as probably on campus like before and Microsoft surface is taking off.

    No it just Apple business motel when comes to OS and hardware to make some thing old very fast.
    Like Apple thunderbolt and USB-C that is useless outside of apple ecosystem because most device like monitor, mouse and external hard-drive so on, that are not made by apple do not support thunderbolt and USB-C.

    Unless you buy Apple device or device mad for Apple. And in 5 years from now there will be some thing else out and Apple will not make and support thunderbolt and USB-C.

    Apple is killing of Mac computers even iOS devices that are no more than 4 years old.
    --- Post Merged, May 6, 2017 ---

    That probably because of the general rule is laptop and notebook computers normally less 6 years. Well some people get lucky and computer less 6 to 10 years. So it not common a laptop and notebook that less 6 to 10 years. But the general rule is laptop and notebook computers normally less 6 years.

    And most computer that are still working 8 to 10 years out are normally too slow to do most things these days. Unless you are just using it as eMachine like light internet use, e-mail and basic typing program.

    Not sure the life span of device like iPad, iPhone, smart phones and tablets but it has no moving parts and unless you rough with it and drop it down yes even one feet or less than one feet well probably last longer.
     
  9. Eric5h5 macrumors 68020

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    Dec 9, 2004
    #10
    Thunderbolt is Intel, not Apple. USB-C is also not Apple, and while Thunderbolt was never widely implemented, USB-C certainly is, plus Thunderbolt 3 uses a USB-C connector so it will probably be less niche. You appear to be upset that Apple pushes for adoption of the latest OS, which is mystifying considering they've been doing that since basically forever. If you want to keep using a 10-year-old OS, Apple was never the platform you'd want to be on.

    --Eric
     
  10. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #11
    It just kinda of strange why Windows and Android support older OS but not Apple. I don't think anyone is advocating any OS maker to support OS more than 10 years old. In such case in that case the person be better to run Linux as Linux run well on 90's computer hardware and 2000's hardware.

    But OS 4 to 7 years old is not old.

    A computer laptop or desktop normally last 6 to 8 years at 10 years if you really lucky. So more than 10 year support for a laptop or desktop should be dead or dying by that time.

    But normally life span of computer is 6 to 8 years at 10 years if you really lucky.
     
  11. Tech198, May 26, 2017
    Last edited: May 26, 2017

    Tech198 macrumors G4

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    Australia, Perth
    #12
    There is one big negative for that.... People who prefer older versions of apps. I know its i the Apple platform, but use case its still on the list as well.

    E.g. LucasArt (now Disney) retired LeChuck's Monkey Island 2. yet to be, its one of he best point-n-click adventures for nostalgic buffs :). and all of the other HD versions drown this out as completely non-playable because its changes so much. too much 3D.

    If your gonna retire stuff, then put them up to download. You don't have to even update it anymore, just as long its available on the App Store. My only regret is i failed to back this app up while i had the chance. This also has the opposite effect of "Apple cleaning up the app store"
     
  12. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    Aug 28, 2012
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    Between the coasts
    #13
    This sort of thing is the developers' choice. It's business, and they'll do what they feel is best for their business. There are always users who want to stick with the old version; sometimes because they consider it a classic, sometimes because they'd rather not adapt to (or fear) change, sometimes because they'd have to pay for the upgrade, sometimes because they haven't been affected by bugs that affect others.... Does every reason for skipping upgrades have to be supported, for every app, or just "artistic merit?"

    If there is a market for a classic game (or other app), then it may make sense to offer that for sale. You mentioned Disney, though... one of their standard business practices is to withdraw classic films from distribution for a period of time, to build demand for the next re-issue/re-release.

    Not that anyone reads the fine print, but both for iTunes and App Store, Apple states that it's the customer's responsibility to back up apps (i.e. save them to iTunes on a computer) if they want to be sure to have them available when desired, just as with backing up any other user data. Apple provides the tools, the question is whether people bother to use them.
     

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