why is mbp2015 so slow boot up (18 sec)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by troels123, Apr 13, 2015.

  1. troels123 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2015
    #1
    I couldn't find much on this and I am wondering why my macbook pro retina 2015 13" is so slow booting up. it takes it roughly 18 sec before it is ready to go and on the desktop. my 2012 macbook air only took 14 sec from turn on to it was ready to use and apple continually say "now the SSD is twice as fast as last year".
    Shouldn't boot up time improve? is there something wrong with my machine or is it suppose to be that "slow". 18 sec isn't long but comparing with my 2012 air, i would expect the 2015 pro retina to be better, not 4 sec slower than a smaller, and 3 year old machine?

    Im sorry if this question already have been asked and answered but i couldn't find it. thank you :)
     
  2. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

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    Dec 5, 2009
    #2
    The SSD is only twice as fast in sequential speed which doesn't really matter for boot up and anything really. That is really kind of pointless speed which rarely comes into play. It looks good as a number that is really it.
    In random access speed Apple's SSDs are actually not all that great. There are faster SSDs which only got a third the sequential speed but they would boot a system faster.

    Boot up can be slower because of updates or drivers that need loading. The MBP has more ports and stuff which might be the issue.
    Really though you only ever need to shutdown your notebook for updates or if you need windows. Otherwise put it into standby and it wouldn't matter if the boot time is half an hour.
     
  3. iSheep5S macrumors 6502a

    iSheep5S

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    #3
    I thought stand by and sleep wasn't good for SSD's? Or am i on here too much?
     
  4. priitv8 macrumors 68020

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    #4
    Why? IMHO even iPhones and iPads do not suffer from taking a nap.
     
  5. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #5
    Nope, nothing I have seen indicates SSDs are harmed by the system sleeping. I don't restart unless needed (update to apply or similar).
     
  6. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

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    #6
    The SSD goes to sleep quite often just to save power. Why ever should stand by be a problem? Never heard that one before. The SSD doesn't care and neither does anything else. You only ever need to restart for updates or windows.
     
  7. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    Jul 24, 2009
    #7
    You could check the start up disk is selected. If it is then your getting the quicker boot option.

    From the Apple menu choose System Preferences.
    Click the Startup Disk icon in System Preferences, or choose View > Startup Disk.
    Select your startup disk from the list of available volumes.
     
  8. iSheep5S macrumors 6502a

    iSheep5S

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    #8
    Writing the RAM to the HD means high write data. Or is this just windows? SSD's will only write so much over time before failing. I like what i'm reading tho.
     
  9. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    Aarhus, Denmark
    #9
    - Yes, it will have to write the full RAM capacity to the SSD.
    But that "so much" SSDs will write is so astronomical (several petabytes) that it will never become an issue for even the most demanding users.
     
  10. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

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    #10
    That's safe sleep in Mac-speak. OS X writes the contents of memory to disk when the battery is about to run out, ordinarily the contents of memory are preserved using battery power.

    An SSD is unlikely to wear out in normal usage, the tech sites doing torture tests are finding that most drives are well exceeding their design life for writes. Example : http://techreport.com/review/27436/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-two-freaking-petabytes
     
  11. iSheep5S macrumors 6502a

    iSheep5S

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    #11
    Thanks for your post and sorry for hijacking the thread. I'm new to Mac's and SSD's. I maybe took a few posts wrong e.g.

    Someone posted torrenting is not good on SSD. I rarely do this (there are legal ones, sure some games are released this way) so i read that and was concerned.
     
  12. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

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    #12
    I can see how torrenting could shorten an SSD lifespan with many small writes occurring often. Wear levelling in the firmware would spread the writes across the entire SSD which would somewhat mitigate the effects.

    If I were to download torrents on a modern SSD equipped Mac I'd probably use a NAS or an external mechanical hard drive to store them for this reason.
     
  13. iSheep5S macrumors 6502a

    iSheep5S

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    #13
    Thanks again. I have a Windows machine as in my sig. TheSlave™, I can use this for torrenting among other uses. Normal mechanical HD.
     
  14. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

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    Apr 6, 2007
    #14
    I have my doubts torrenting would be that much of a problem. Whether you're writing a small number of bytes at a time, or writing the whole file at once, you're still writing the same amount of data, so the same amount of wear would occur. The data might be more fragmenting, but data fragmentation is a non-issue on SSDs.

    If data were constantly being written and then erased, that would be an area of concern. So, if you're torrenting to an SSD, then moving the data someplace else, and torrenting again to the same drive over and over, then that might not be a good idea. But the same would also be true if you were just doing regular downloads to an SSD and then offloading someplace else, and repeating.
     
  15. ABC5S Suspended

    ABC5S

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    Sep 10, 2013
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    Florida
    #15
    Just to give you my experience, my past 13 inch retina 2014 gave me a 9 second boot up (128 gb) and now my 15 inch model (256 gb) does the same. Something is not right. Your TRIM should be on by default, but just for the heck of it, check it to see if it is.
     

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  16. ZBoater macrumors G3

    ZBoater

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    Sunny Florida
    #16
    How did you go about measuring that?

    I have Filevault turned on, so after I power, it almost instantly goes to the login screen. After i enter my password, it takes 15 seconds to come to the main screen measured by stopwatch.
     
  17. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

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    #17
    YMMV depending on the client. In theory if it caches incomplete data in memory as it streams in and only writes in nice complete sector size chunks then that'd be fantastic. If it writes what it gets on the fly and the file is not aligned then the OS will rewrite multiple times as it completes the sector which would be bad for an SSD.

    On a related but not Mac specific note - I tried using NTFS compression on a mechanical hard drive that was downloading ISOs over a P2P network many years ago. The drive tied itself in knots as the files massively fragmented into tens of thousands of parts. So much so that it couldn't defragment the files even with lots of free space.
     
  18. diesel, Apr 13, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2015

    diesel macrumors 6502a

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    Aug 3, 2007
    #18
    why is mbp2015 so slow boot up (18 sec)

    From the time I hit the power button to the time I get the login screen it takes about 9 secs. From the login to the time the desktop pops up another 8 secs so I don't think you have anything to worry about.

    Just tried it again and 12 secs to login screen and then once I entered password and it was another 4 secs to the desktop the second time around. Not sure why the time difference between the two attempts but overall time is within close proximity.
     
  19. Laserducky macrumors regular

    Laserducky

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    Dec 29, 2013
    #19
    My 2015 Macbook Pro Retina was taking 28 secs to boot. Did a PRAM reset and it went down to 22 seconds. Couple of days later went back to 28 seconds ...did a PRAM reset again and it went down to 22 secs again :)

    I'm not too bothered as otherwise its a fine machine and no other issues so far. So relax and go enjoy your machine and stop worrying unless you machine is taking 45+ secs to boot, then you have a real problem. Different people have different machines, configs and setups : hard to generalise

    My late 2013 iMac with 8gb RAM and 1TB Fusion Drive (Running Yosemite) takes about 14 seconds from the moment I press the power button till I see the desktop...now ..that's sweet !!!
     
  20. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #20
    Wait a minute here, I just want to make sure I'm getting this straight.

    Are you actually complaining about 4 seconds?

    How often do you actually boot the machine anyway? Sleep is nearly instant, why don't you use that if you're so worried about those 4 seconds?
     
  21. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #21
    I've just replaced my Crucial 120GB SSD boot drive with a Crucial 512GB SSD, at replacement time I had used 15% of its write lifespan according to DriveDX.

    I think almost all regular uses of SSD will see the SSD replaced before its lifespan is used. I ran the drive for 2yrs.
     

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