Why is my MacBook slow at startup?

jwolf6589

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
1,936
303
Colorado
My 2012 MacBook Pro is slow at startup, and to launch apps at startup, but once they are launched and its warmed up things are fast. Why is this? Is this because I have a conventional HDD? Some have told me to upgrade, but this will cost allot of money to get a 500GB SSD drive and to have it installed as I am not the most mechanically inclined person, so I will live with my conventional HDD for now until prices drastically drop. Besides what I do the conventional drive works just fine. I watch movies, I write letters, I surf the web, I track a budget, I text message, and I do basic tasks. I do no video editing, photo editing (except what can be done in photos), and so on. I live with Quicken, MS office, etc..
 

mikzn

macrumors 68020
Sep 2, 2013
2,206
1,553
Vancouver
Absolutely because it is a HDD - get the SSD - it will boot / start up in 12 to 18 seconds and everything is faster that involves loading large files - video, pictures etc.

Easy to replace check out iFixit for replacement steps and pictures for your model - I purchased an EVO 850 500 g for my 2012 i7 it was a completely different computer after that. Took about 20 minutes to replace.

I used to turn on the macbook and go for a coffee, now I could not make it across the room before it is booted and ready to go.
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
1,936
303
Colorado
Absolutely because it is a HDD - get the SSD - it will boot / start up in 12 to 18 seconds and everything is faster that involves loading large files - video, pictures etc.

Easy to replace check out iFixit for replacement steps and pictures for your model - I purchased an EVO 850 550 g for my 2012 i7 it was a completely different computer after that.
When I get the money. How much would it cost for a 500GB drive and the install?
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
20,155
7,101
jwolf, you've posted on this problem numerous times here at MacRumors.

The answer remains the same:
Swap out the platter based hard drive inside for an SSD.
It will make a DRAMATIC improvement.

Why do you keep posting over and over again, when the answer will always be the same?

Young man, can you hold a screwdriver in your hands?
If you can do that, you can upgrade the MacBook Pro in about 15 minutes.
You are not helpless.

Why do you keep posting that it will be so "expensive"?
A Crucial MX500 will run you about $120:
https://www.amazon.com/Crucial-MX50...sr=8-1-spons&keywords=crucial+500gb+ssd&psc=1

If you're willing to settle for 250gb, it will cost only $72:
https://www.amazon.com/Crucial-MX50...=1528036422&sr=8-5&keywords=crucial+500gb+ssd

You'll also need one of these, price $13:
https://www.amazon.com/Sabrent-2-5-...478&sr=1-2-spell&keywords=sabremt+usb3+to+ssd

You need 2 drivers:
- Phillips #00 driver
- TORX T-6 driver
Both can be found at hardware stores or online.

When you have this stuff, connect the SSD to the USB3 dongle and plug it in.
Open Disk Utility and erase it to Mac OS extended with journaling enabled, GUID partition format.

The drive is now ready for the OS.

Now download CarbonCopyCloner from here:
http://www.bombich.com/download.html

Which version you download depends on which version of the OS you're using now.

Open CCC (it's FREE to use for 30 days).
Put your internal drive on the left.
Put the SSD "to the right"
Accept CCC's defaults and "let 'er go".

CCC will clone the contents of your internal drive to the external SSD.

When done, quit CCC and power off the MacBook.

Now... press the power on key and IMMEDIATELY hold down the option key and KEEP HOLDING IT DOWN until you see the startup manager.

You should see the internal drive AND the external SSD as bootable drives.
Use the pointer to select the SSD and hit return.

Do you get a good boot?
It will look "just like the internal drive did", because "it's a clone".
If you get a good boot, now it's time to do the drive swap.

I'm NOT going to tell you what to do next.
Let's see if you can get yourself this far first.
It's easier than you think.
 
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jerryk

macrumors 603
Nov 3, 2011
6,109
3,087
SF Bay Area
They are.. however, what SSD can sustain multiple writes and last as long as a regular HD ? Hybrids ?
Samsung says their drives can do 10 tb/day for 25 to 38 years. That is more than long enough for most people.

But ssds can lose data after 10 years without power. And are not recommended for data archiving.
 
Last edited:

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
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They are.. however, what SSD can sustain multiple writes and last as long as a regular HD ? Hybrids ?
All of them, HDD's usually die within 5 years, Most SSD's will last at least 10 years of writes at an average users usage. Of course this is barring catastrophic failure that can happen with any electronics.
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
1,936
303
Colorado
All of them, HDD's usually die within 5 years, Most SSD's will last at least 10 years of writes at an average users usage. Of course this is barring catastrophic failure that can happen with any electronics.
Not true. Not true. My mom has a MacBook from 2009 this is still running strong on a standard HDD.
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,694
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Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,694
2,123
Honestly if you can hold a screwdriver and get the correct ones its a 15 minute job that anyone can do on that machine.

Here is a very detailed guide for you.

https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+15-Inch+Unibody+Mid+2012+Hard+Drive+Replacement/10761

If you have a hard drive caddy (or usb to sata cable) you can even use carbon copy cloner to create a complete copy of your current setup on the new SSD using USB and then just swap out the drives and off you go.
 
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