Why is my wifi SO slow???

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by The.316, Feb 14, 2015.

  1. The.316 macrumors 65816

    The.316

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    25100 GR
    #1
    Im using a Cisco x3000 modem/router here in my apartment, and before that, I was using a regular modem, which I connected to my 2tb time capsule. Everything was fine today, then, after watching a youtube video on my Apple TV, the wifi is extremely slow, under 1mbs, and the ping is around 300. I went to the x3000s page, and rebooted it, it would then work fine for a few minutes, but drop again to less than 1mbs/300+ ping. But, on the X3000s page, its showing my upload/download speeds as normal. This happens not too often, but it has happened to me before. Its the reason why Im using the x3000 now, instead of the TC, because I thought it was an issue with the TC.

    Last time it happened, I changed the password to the wifi, and it worked for a few days, but did then this happened. It also happened one time after I uploaded one photo to photobucket. It got really slow, then after a little bit, it went back to normal. Thoughts?
     
  2. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #2
    Interference? Specifically, from other wifi access points on the same or nearby channels.

    You don't say which bands you're using (2.4 and/or 5 GHz), or which bands your prior AP used. Nor what channels on the band. That can be important information.

    You also don't say how far the wifi clients are located from the x3000, or what's between them (what kind of walls, floors, etc.). All of this can be important if the signal level is marginal at best, and becomes disrupted by an interfering signal with more power.
     
  3. The.316 thread starter macrumors 65816

    The.316

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    25100 GR
    #3
    Apologize for not going into more detail about the setup. I have a one bedroom apartment. The x3000, as well as the TC and modem before that, are located in my bedroom. I have my iMac in the bedroom, and in the living room, I have my PS4, Apple TV, and HP wireless printer. One thin wall separates everything I just mentioned, aside from the iMac, from the x3000. You can consider it a wall, but its right next to the door frame of the wall. I also have my ipad and iphone connected.

    As you can see, I have my network hidden. I thought maybe there would be an advantage to doing it that way. Not everything is connected and used at the same time. My iMac, ipad, and iphone are always connected, and the PS4 only when I play it, as well as the Apple TV.

    Im not too sure as far as settings go, so I didnt touch most of the settings for the x3000. The only thing I just did a little while ago was disable WMM. Im not too sure what to disable, enable, change values, etc., so I dont touch them. As you can see, the dload speed is around 11, and I usually get around 9.5/29 ping when I run speedtest, but sometimes, it goes to around 1, with a ping of 300+. I had the same problem when I had my TC connected to a modem. I ended up bridging the modem to the TC, and entered my service providers info in the TC. That worked for a while, but then I got the same slow dload speeds on wifi only. I thought there was an issue with the TC, which is why I went to the x3000.

    Also, before when I thought I had an issue with the time capsule, I called Apple's customer service, and the lady on the phone told me that since I have so may devices connected to the TC, that was the reason the speeds were so slow. I thought she was rude, and it was BS, because no way will the things I have connected to the modem drop it from 10mbs to 1. She assured me that was the reason, so I just ended up hanging up.

    Firmware is up to date btw

    Below are some screenshots.


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  4. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #4
    Exactly what wifi capabilities does each device have? You will need to find this out for each device, for the specific model you have. I recommend making a written list, so you can keep the info for later.

    The main item of interest for each device is whether it can use the 5 GHz band, or whether it's limited to only the 2.4 GHz band. The 5 GHz band has wider channels, more channels, and less interference in general. There is some potential for less range in the 5 GHz band, but within a single apartment this is unlikely to matter.

    After determining which bands your devices can operate in, you need to discover what your local wireless environment looks like. What other wireless networks are present? What band are they in (5 GHz or 2.4 GHz)? What channels are they on? How strong are the signals? In short, what is the overall potential for interference?

    Finding out all this can be done with the Wireless Diagnostics tool. See here:
    http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202663

    The simplest way to start it is to hold down the OPTION modifier key, then choose "Open Wireless Diagnostics..." from the wifi/Airport menu extension. (That's its name in 10.8.4 Mtn Lion; it might have a different name in your OS version.)

    The basic diagnostics have some value, but the real value of that tool is in its Utilities window (start reading at "Utilities window" on that page). The Info and Scan panes are most useful in discovering the environment. The "Live Signal" graph is useful when evaluating configuration changes (band, channel) to see how well they work.

    You can scan for all visible wireless networks, discover their received signal strength (RSSI), band, channel, SSID (name) etc. You can then use this to determine which band is less populated, which channels are occupied (to avoid them), and so on.

    The goal should be to find the band with the fewest other networks, then choose an unused channel in that band. Then you should configure your router to use only that band, and only that channel.

    If some of your devices are 2.4 GHz only, then create a network with a separate name, and only connect the limited devices to it. Anything that can use 5 GHz should do so.

    If possible, connect your iMac using an ethernet cable only. You'll obviously need wifi active to run Wireless Diagnostics, but after that, don't connect it with wifi. The fewer devices you have on wifi, the better each device will work.


    This has no value in terms of signal strength or speed of connection.

    It has very little value in terms of avoiding leeches (freeloaders). Anyone with a tool like iStumbler can find networks that don't broadcast their SSIDs. Far more important for keeping out leeches is to use WPA2 with a good password. WEP is worthless for security, and should not be used.

    iStumbler is actually a pretty useful tool for evaluating your wireless environment. It can tell you more than Wireless Diagnostics , so if you have continued problems, consider getting it (it's not free).


    Why disable WMM?

    Especially since the default is enabled, why disable it? Were you advised to? What's the source for that advice?

    There's nothing in what you posted that distinguishes between your wireless local network (WLAN) performance and your upstream DSL performance. Nothing clearly says or even hints that a cause for low speed is in one place or another.

    It could be the WLAN has lots of interference. It could be your DSL connection has problems. There's simply no way to tell from what you posted. The fact that performance slowdowns are intermittent doesn't point to one or the other, either.


    It may not be BS, but there's no way to tell from what you've posted.


    Referring to the screenshots, in the "Configuration View", for "Network Mode", what are the possible options other than "Mixed"? I suspect the choice of band might be under there, but I know nothing about this particular router, so I'm guessing.
     

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