Why shouldn't I clean my Mac?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by ZlatanIbra, Apr 25, 2014.

  1. ZlatanIbra macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2014
    #1
    Hello MacRumors :D
    I switched from a windows to a Mac. On my Windows I was used to clean it now and then. I would do something like:

    - delete the cache
    - delete missing registry files
    - delete temp. files
    - perform a quick antivirus scan

    But after reading some Mac peoples statements, you shouldn't clean a Mac at all, because the Mac does it by itself - but how?

    How come a Mac can't get 'dirty' over time? :confused:

    Would someone please help me understand this, because I really can't understand how my Mac will be performing great after 2 years without any form for cleaning or maintenance...

    Thanks in advance! :apple:
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
  3. ZlatanIbra thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2014
    #3
    Thanks for the links.

    I've read them now... and it just seems too good to be true.

    But have to trust that my Mac won't become 'dirty'.
    Some of my friends' old macbooks, are slow and indeed 'dirty'. But that must be their downloads from non trusted sites....

    What are your experiences with a mac versus a Windows after a couple of years? I surely know what a Windows will become, if you don't clean it!
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    I've used the same MacBook Pro for the past six years, and I've never used any cleaning or maintenance apps on it. It still runs today as fast as it did day one. This is true of all the Macs I've owned. Everything that applies to Windows does not necessarily apply to OS X. For example, malware in the Windows environment is much more prevalent and a greater concern that it is in the OS X environment, where there are no viruses and only a handful of Trojans, which can successfully be avoided without the need for any antivirus software.

    Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
    Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.

    You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Most only remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.
    These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. In fact, deleting some caches can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.
    Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance. OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.
     
  5. BrettApple macrumors 65816

    BrettApple

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Location:
    Heart of the midwest
    #5
    I agree with all of the above. I've got macs from all ages and they all still run great.

    When I see a slow Mac, it's almost always just the fact that it has an older hard drive, and a newer OS that is bigger than the one it shipped with.

    For example, my 2007 iMac and my 2008 MacBook. They shipped with Tiger and Leopard, and run great under those. Boot super fast, open up fast. But with Mavericks and Lion they were crawling. A RAM upgrade from 2GB to 4GB and 6GB helped immensely, but when I swapped out the old spinning HDD to an SSD they were good as new.

    This is especially true in laptops with older 5400 RPM drives. They just need the bottleneck removed. It's not usually the file system.

    This is not to say Mac's can't get gunked up a little. Just not as often. Sometimes a permissions repair or disk repair may be needed, but that's usually the extent of it.
     
  6. swingerofbirch macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    The Amalgamated States of Central North America
    #6
    Probably it's more likely that their hard drives near capacity, which can slow down the computer and cause other problems (on a Mac, I've heard the general rule is to leave 10% disk space free). They may have also upgraded to an OS that doesn't run as well on their system. And the other issue is that the Web itself is constantly being "upgraded" with more and more resource intensive sites.
     
  7. ZlatanIbra thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2014
    #7
    Thank you all for your replies.

    This makes me a lot more grateful about my Mac! :apple:
     
  8. Alkaid, Apr 27, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2014

    Alkaid macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    #8
    Good luck with your new Mac ZlatanIbra. Treat it well and a Mac can last you an extremely long time.

    Anyways, best of luck with your new machine!
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Having files or folders stored on the desktop has no effect on performance of OS X, just has having files or folders stored anywhere else on your drive has no effect on performance. The Desktop is just another folder on your drive.
     
  10. Alkaid macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    #10
    Yeah, it seems I worded things incorrectly. I found it a helpful tip just to help me keep organized as I came from Windows to a Mac myself many years ago (where I would have folders everywhere)

    However, I do appreciate the correction. (I'll tweak my post to be correct now) Best not to mix up fact from fiction!
     
  11. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #11
    At one time there was a slight need to keep the desktop clean. With each new thing on it, Finder used slightly more memory, about 512KB to 2MB more. This was true for Mac OS 7 through 10.4. It may still be true, but to a lesser degree as most end users won't notice the difference with the large amount of memory in most systems.
     
  12. Alkaid macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    #12
    Ah, now that would explain it then. I started out on 10.4 oh so many years ago. So, thank you for that, I really appreciate it.
     
  13. NJFP macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    #13
    Been reading the above with interest. I downloaded Clean My Mac myself a while ago, and after having heard that it's more sham than wow, I deleted it. At least I thought I did! I keep getting a small pop-up window in the upper right hand corner of my screen saying things like "Your trash is 5.06 MB Time to run CleanMyMac." I look for anything clean my mac on my computer and can not find a darn thing! Where do I look/go to to get rid of this annoying popup??

    MacBookPro, (2008) Mavericks, OS X 10.9.2

    Thanks!
     
  14. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
  15. NJFP macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    #15
    Done! Found a bunch of hidden files. There's still one that I can't get rid of no matter what I try. It's labeled "com.macpaw.CleanMyMac2.plist." Can't get rid of this little bugger........
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #16
    If you follow all of the instructions in the link in simsaladimbamba's post before yours, you'll be able to delete it.
     
  17. soka7705 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 18, 2014
    #17
    what to do with a full startup disk

    Hi,
    read all your answers and have to agree that it all sounds very good - except that I've been looking for a program like "CleanMyMac2" for the following reason: I get the warning message that my startup disk is almost full - and even after copying ALL my documents, deleting a lot of stuff (AND emptying the trash ;-) ) there still isn't a lot of empty space. When looking at the MAC diagnose it says that half of the storage is filled with stuff called "other" - any good advice what to do if I according to your advice shouldn't use a third party software to clean up?
     
  18. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #18
    If you're wondering what "Other" category in the storage tab is about, this may help explain: For space issues not explained by the above, there are a few things you can try, some of which may or may not apply: Here are a few resolutions found by others with the same question: Freeing up drive space in Mac OS X
     
  19. swingerofbirch macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    The Amalgamated States of Central North America
    #19
    It can still affect performance. I have OCD, and I have had a compulsion to take screen shots by hitting command-shift-3 and would amass thousands of screenshots on the desktop. The default option is for icons to preview the image, which really does slow down the computer. I've now changed the default save location for screenshots as well as not showing a preview, along with trying not to hit the key combination.
     
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #20
    You can easily change the default location for screen shots, so they don't clutter your desktop.

    To change the default format for screencap images, type the following in Terminal.app:
    defaults write com.apple.screencapture type jpg (or whatever extension you prefer)

    To change the default folder for screencap images, type the following in Terminal.app:
    defaults write com.apple.screencapture location "/Users/username/Desktop/" (or whatever path you prefer)
     

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