Why the video pros are moving away from Apple

maflynn

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Interesting article about the state of the video industry regarding Apple and video processionals. http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2...-to-acknowledge-the-pro-industry-and-fast.ars

Personally, I thought that apple was moving away from professionals to focus more on the consumer (or prosumer) side of things. Here's one article that seems to confirm my suspensions.


Some interesting quotes from the article
"The perception here is that Apple is more concerned with selling iPads and iPhones than they are with the people who have stuck with them since the 90's, the professional editors and VFX people," said Jude Mull, who works at a post-production facility in Hollywood that processes and digitizes some of your favorite TV shows.
Mull explained that this perception was already there when FCPX was announced, but has only increased since then due to Apple's aggressive attempt to cut and switch up its features. For example, when editing video for TV shows, editors will put together a final Edit Decision List (EDL) with data that essentially tells the post production facility which scenes to keep or cut. "Why Apple decided to do away with EDLs is beyond me. This makes me think they aren't targeting the professional market," Mull told Ars. "When I read Final Cut Pro X didn't have the ability to generate an EDL I figured Apple is targeting a different audience, the Tweeners, people with a little $, time and creativity, the Indie crowd. This looks stupid to even read, so again, kind of baffled."
The release of FCPX may be the catalyst for driving away industry professionals, but it's not the only contributor to the problem. The fact that the Mac Pro seems to be on Apple's back burner is making professional users nervous and forcing them to begin looking at other—non-Mac—hardware solutions to ensure their future employability.
All in all, with FCPX, apple made a bold statement, but that statement seemed to say that this is an application more geared to prosumers then professionals. Dropping features that professionals need to accomplish their jobs only mean they'll look for another solution. Throw in the persistent rumors that the Mac Pro is nearing or at End of Life certainly exacerbates the situation.

I'm not a video professional, but I look on with dismay that apple moves away from a customer sector that that once was so loyal to apple.

One could argue that the professional sector is a stable sector if you get entrenched, where as consumers can be rather fickle a bunch.
 
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leekohler

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This is the future, anyway. And a larger and extremely profitable (as we're seeing) segment.

I doubt sentimentality plays into anyone's profit scheme, especially when major market shifts are happening.
Ditching a solid pro market is never a good move, because that's a loyal segment if business. When consumers switch to the next big thing (and they will), Apple will regret it's current path. Remember, Steve is gone- it's only a matter of time until the bean counters move in and ruin the company.
 

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Ditching a solid pro market is never a good move, because that's a loyal segment if business. When consumers switch to the next big thing (and they will), Apple will regret it's current path. Remember, Steve is gone- it's only a matter of time until the bean counters move in and ruin the company.
That's quite a prediction.

Then again, Apple's consumer-centric formula is built to last. Anyone in the industry who understands consumers will profit and grow. After years and years, Apple are still the ones holding a seminar for everyone else and putting the competition to school, and one thing is for certain: the industry has a lot of poor students.

Just look at the joke CES was this year.

You're arguing for a decline in Apple precipitated (slowly, over time) by the absence of Steve Jobs. That's a possibility. However, with the presence of Tim Cook, Jony Ive, and Scott Forstall (to name but three), they are still quite easily the most talented group in tech today. So it comes down to a question of likelihood, probability, and so on. One that I'd be reluctant to ask for at least 5 years (now that we're on the topic of predictions . . .)

All things being equal, I'd still have more faith in an Apple without Steve Jobs, than in the competition on their best day.
 
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Stella

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No business should trust Apple and rely on them for hardware and thus software. Too consumer focused thus no road maps and secrecy.

Even Apple are lost interest in some consumer software with no indication of their future - I.e iWork, pro consumer - Aperture.

If a business picks up a piece of software or hardware they need to know it has a future and will be supported. I don't get that reassurance from apple.
 

leekohler

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That's quite a prediction.

Then again, Apple's consumer-centric formula is built to last. Anyone in the industry who understands consumers will profit and grow. After years and years, Apple are still the ones holding a seminar for everyone else and putting the competition to school, and one thing is for certain: the industry has a lot of poor students.

Just look at the joke CES was this year.

You're arguing for a decline in Apple precipitated (slowly, over time) by the absence of Steve Jobs. That's a possibility. However, with the presence of Tim Cook, Jony Ive, and Scott Forstall (to name but three), they are still quite easily the most talented group in tech today. So it comes down to a question of likelihood, probability, and so on. One that I'd be reluctant to ask for at least 5 years (now that we're on the topic of predictions . . .)

All things being equal, I'd still have more faith in an Apple without Steve Jobs, than in the competition on their best day.
Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. This happens to every company out there. It may be today, tomorrow or next week, but it WILL happen eventually. Apple won't go away, but eventually, it's influence will diminish.
 

*LTD*

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No business should trust Apple and rely on them for hardware and thus software. Too consumer focused thus no road maps and secrecy.

Even Apple are lost interest in some consumer software with no indication of their future - I.e iWork, pro consumer - Aperture.

If a business picks up a piece of software or hardware they need to know it has a future and will be supported. I don't get that reassurance from apple.
Do you get that reassurance from so many of the competition's failed products and platforms in recent years (in contrast to Apple's stability)?

They can't even deploy a decent tablet in the consumer space, never mind in the enterprise.
 

Consultant

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They've thought the original Final Cut was a joke too.

They've thought the original OS X was doomed due to lack of OS 9 features too.
 

KnightWRX

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I think the Xserve debacle signaled to everyone how Apple was done with the enterprise/business/professional creators markets more than anything. FCPX was just a confirmation.
 

zioxide

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Real video pros always used Avid anyways. That's all they had when I was taking all of my media classes in school.

Final Cut was never more than high-end prosumer software.
 

leekohler

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I think the Xserve debacle signaled to everyone how Apple was done with the enterprise/business/professional creators markets more than anything. FCPX was just a confirmation.
Yep- bottom line is employability. I've been a Mac user since they began. But I can't stick with them if this is where the industry goes. It simply won't be possible to do so.
 

KnightWRX

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They've thought the original OS X was doomed due to lack of OS 9 features too.
Except everyone who knew something about computers could see how OS 9 was retarded by the time Apple finally killed it. It was archaic and in need of replacement and had been for a long time. OS X was a great foundation and the "missing" features were not architectural at all, hence would come in later updates.
 

*LTD*

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Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. This happens to every company out there. It may be today, tomorrow or next week, but it WILL happen eventually. Apple won't go away, but eventually, it's influence will diminish.
Fair enough, but we don't know *when*. Apple could very well hit new milestones for the next decade.

I hesitate to predict any measurable downturn, say, 2 years from now, based on the complete absence of any evidence *today* which would suggest that. And given what we know of Apple's plans, they aim to have a much wider and far-reaching effect on consumer tech than they do now, so at the very least, we know the philosophy, resources, and outright cash is still there. For instance, if they do move into the TV segment and simply execute on their usual Apple-esque strategy (thereby redefining that segment as well, which I'm betting they will), then calls for their decline (within any foreseeable timeframe) become even more baseless.

This isn't the Apple of 20 years ago, nor is this the market of 20 years ago. Nor is this the same "Pro" market of 20 years ago.
 
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Stella

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Except this time, they're leaving. I myself have held off buying a new tower until I know where Apple is going with this.
Which is a shame. If apple only concentrate on the most profitable parts of its business and lose interest in other parts that are still profitable tells you the sort of company it is: it will won't stick with a product for the long haul on most occasions. Apple is more short term driven. OK for consumers not business. Apple is ready to drop a product for the next new thing. That is consumer driven.
 

kolax

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The discontinuation of servers, the Mac Pro's future hanging in doubt..

Can't Apple cater to consumer, prosumer and professionals? I'm not merely talking about marketing terms (such as a pro label on a laptop), I'm talking about worthy hardware for say video professionals, and software to go along with it.
 

BornAgainMac

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I assume people would move to Windows. That would be like a Windows user moving to Linux. The move will save money but the experience will not be pleasant. I wish Final Cut and the Mac Pro would get Apple's focus for the professional.
 

*LTD*

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Which is a shame. If apple only concentrate on the most profitable parts of its business and lose interest in other parts that are still profitable
Are they "still profitable"? What are you basing this on? And to what degree? To the degree that these parts are worth any further allocation of resources (which might precipitate *fewer* resources for other areas)? How have you arrived at this decision?

Which
tells you the sort of company it is: it will won't stick with a product for the long haul on most occasions. Apple is more short term driven. OK for consumers not business. Apple is ready to drop a product for the next new thing. That is consumer driven.
Apple's platform seems long-term. iOS, long-term. Macs, long term. They haven't dropped the iPhone. They still make iPods. OS X sure seems long-term. They also seem fairly committed to the iPad and what it brings to the table. If anything, Apple keeps adding to their already robust platform.

There *will* be dropped or discontinued products here and there. It's all based on the level of interest and demand. There is no reason to hang on to non-performing assets. Someone, at some point, will be on the losing end of Apple's decisions. But this is generally based on number/% of users affected. If the group is small enough (and enough of an unprofitable target) then the decision is quite sensible, if not immediately obvious.

----------

The discontinuation of servers, the Mac Pro's future hanging in doubt..

Can't Apple cater to consumer, prosumer and professionals? I'm not merely talking about marketing terms (such as a pro label on a laptop), I'm talking about worthy hardware for say video professionals, and software to go along with it.
Just because a market exists doesn't mean you need to (or should) cater to it.
 
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Hellhammer

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I think the Xserve debacle signaled to everyone how Apple was done with the enterprise/business/professional creators markets more than anything. FCPX was just a confirmation.
Exactly. There is a lot money in enterprise market as well but looks like it's a market that Apple was never able to convince. Apple didn't leave the market because there isn't enough money involved, Apple's products were simply inferior to others which lead to bad sales.

Enterprise market is also a lot steadier, companies don't usually overhaul their infrastructure (change OS etc) very often and if they do, it must be for a good reason. Consumers, on the other hand, buy new products almost every year and there is much less stopping them from switching the whole ecosystem at the same time. Sure, you can make more profit in the consumer market but the chances of making those profits year after year is much smaller. This is kind of what happened to Nokia, suddenly they weren't the best and only thing in town. People didn't have a problem with buying another brand phone but getting a company to change all their systems at once will require more than a whim.
 

twoodcc

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i don't know, i think as long as Apple keeps the Mac Pro around, with a nice update this year, that the video pro market will give FCPX a try. i think if they actually try the software, they'll see that it isn't all that bad
 

Stella

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i don't know, i think as long as Apple keeps the Mac Pro around, with a nice update this year, that the video pro market will give FCPX a try. i think if they actually try the software, they'll see that it isn't all that bad
FCPX will also require a nice update too. The Pro's that have tried it won't give FCPX a second chance until the required functionality is added back again. Googling "missing FCPX features".

( BTW - I don't want to bucket all Pros into a single group, some Pros are happy with the existing functionality, while others need the functionality that is in FCP 7 but isn't in X ).
 

Consultant

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Except everyone who knew something about computers could see how OS 9 was retarded by the time Apple finally killed it. It was archaic and in need of replacement and had been for a long time. OS X was a great foundation and the "missing" features were not architectural at all, hence would come in later updates.
Many would say that FCPX is also a "foundation" designed for future updates.
 

Stella

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Many would say that FCPX is also a "foundation" designed for future updates.
If that was the case then Apple should have been up front about it. Remember Apple discontinued ( withdrew from sale ) FCP7 at the launch of FCPX… why would they do this if FCPX was a foundation like you suggested.
 

*LTD*

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If that was the case then Apple should have been up front about it. Remember Apple discontinued ( withdrew from sale ) FCP7 at the launch of FCPX… why would they do this if FCPX was a foundation like you suggested.
In a rare (and somewhat disappointing) move Apple gave in to the naysayers. We'll see if this was actually required a couple of years from now.
 

KnightWRX

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Many would say that FCPX is also a "foundation" designed for future updates.
The difference is in the transition paths. When Apple introduced FCPX, it took quite a bit of whining for them to reintroduce FCP7 licensing.

When they cut out the Xserve, they offered a joke of a replacement option (Mac Pro Server or Mac Mini Server... where's the VMWare option on proper hardware ?).

When they intro'ed OS X, they didn't even make it the default OS on their shipping hardware. When they finally did, it had implemented the missing features and it still had the Classic mode to run OS 9 applications.

If you really don't see the difference in these transitions and how they were done, then I can't explain to you why 2 of those look like Apple abandonning a niche, vs one of them showing a proper transition to new technology.
 
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