why use time code & when

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by matteusclement, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #1
    I am reading that the 5diii has time code feature. Why is that a big deal?
    When do you use time code and how does it work?

    Is is just for syncing cameras up?

    ALso, how do you get premiere to give you a multi camera view when you have a few clips on the time line playing simultaneously?
     
  2. kevinfulton.ca macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    #2
    Time code is mainly used as a reference point to help organize your footage for various stages of post production as well as a reference point for editing and sound sync. Example: Using multiple memory cards you would set the video time code numerically. Card 1= 01:00:00:00 Card 2= 02:00:00:00 etc. It may also be used for audio sync reference, but usually the audio time code would be displayed on the smart slate......................providing that the smart slate is working and the slate jammer checked it before showing it to the camera. For dumb slates you'd definitely want to make sure that your audio guy is recording at the same time code hour as you as a reference point to help sync. All of this will help once the footage gets back to the editor and sound designers. The more footage you collect and people you involve, the more important it is to stay organized.
     
  3. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #3
    Tried this yet?
    Learn Premiere Pro CS5 - MultiCam editing

    As for TC, kevinfulton.ca explained it quite well.
    When we shot a multicam candid camera show, we used up to 8 cameras, two Digi Beta, four DV and to small hidden cameras. The DB cameras were using Free Run TC, meaning the actual time was used and were synched once a day by the sound recordist via his recorder. The DV cameras got Lockits to have that TC recorded onto the audio track, thus no on-set audio was recorded with those cameras.
    In post we then had up to 8 video tracks and one audio track to synch. TC helps with that, but since the Lockits they used were a bit defective, one still had to synch everything by hand, which is a pain in the arse with 1300 cassettes with approximately 1000 hours of footage.
     
  4. matteusclement thread starter macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #4
    Thank you so much to both of you. That helped alot.
     
  5. sarge macrumors 6502a

    sarge

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #5
    Even if you're only dealing w/a single clip, having an embedded timecode is important. Editing, streaming, close caption info etc., are all TC critical.

    Rewind if you will, to the 1980s where VHS has no timecode (unlike S-VHS) and only has control track. Say for example you wanted to fast forward to the Babyruth scene in Caddyshack...you could use the counter to get an approximation but you could never rely on it to know you hit the mark for sure.

    In the consumer world this is a matter of convenience, but in broadcasting a couple of frames can be the difference between biting into a babyruth or biting into something that only looks like a babyruth...and not nearly as sweet.
     
  6. WRP macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    Location:
    Boston
    #6
    All the timecode answers have been good. Also a lot of times a field producer or PA will be taking notes on set based on timecode. This is many times invaluable to an editor. They often make a paper edit and instead of wading through 4 cameras of footage for a certain line, if you have the notes from the producer it can make rough stringouts take minutes instead of days.
     

Share This Page