Wi-Fi Help!

Willie5566

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 10, 2010
187
0
Help!

I am sitting at families place and cannot get any apple products to connect to Wi-Fi. We have iPod Touch, 2 iPads, iPhone, MBP. Nothing connects. The one person with a PC connected right away. Is there something that we need to do to get connection. It is password protected but we have all entered the same password and only the PC is working.
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,670
28
located
What exact router model do you have and what password protection is the router using (WEP, WPA, WPA2)? Can you connect the MBP via ethernet cable? Could it be, that the router limits the access via MAC addresses?
 

Macman45

macrumors G5
Jul 29, 2011
13,199
133
Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
The Clue Is

Help!

I am sitting at families place and cannot get any apple products to connect to Wi-Fi. We have iPod Touch, 2 iPads, iPhone, MBP. Nothing connects. The one person with a PC connected right away. Is there something that we need to do to get connection. It is password protected but we have all entered the same password and only the PC is working.
"I'm sitting at my families place"

To connect, you need their password and to join their network.
 

Willie5566

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 10, 2010
187
0
It is a motorola sbv5220 SURFboard cable modem provided by local cable company. I am really not sure about frequency or the Mac address thing. It was set up by cable provider so they did the settings. Why would you want to limit Mac addresses anyway???? If the person has the network password who cares what device they are using? I am sure this is ignorance on my part but that doesn't make any sense to me.
 

satcomer

macrumors 604
Feb 19, 2008
6,849
1,153
The Finger Lakes Region
That is modem and not a wireless router. The ISP modem does one Ethernet port with ONE IP. A router (is your case a wireless router) should be connected to from the WAN port to the modem.
 

Macman45

macrumors G5
Jul 29, 2011
13,199
133
Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
Nope

It is a motorola sbv5220 SURFboard cable modem provided by local cable company. I am really not sure about frequency or the Mac address thing. It was set up by cable provider so they did the settings. Why would you want to limit Mac addresses anyway???? If the person has the network password who cares what device they are using? I am sure this is ignorance on my part but that doesn't make any sense to me.
You are doing the right things, do your mac devices "See" the network?
 

Willie5566

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 10, 2010
187
0
I stand corrected it is a Linksys 2.4 ghz wireless router.

----------

You are doing the right things, do your mac devices "See" the network?
Yes the devices see the network.

I am seeing Mac Address and a Access Point MAC address. Does that do anything?
 

Macman45

macrumors G5
Jul 29, 2011
13,199
133
Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
Do You See A Network Name?

I stand corrected it is a Linksys 2.4 ghz wireless router.

----------



Yes the devices see the network.

I am seeing Mac Address and a Access Point MAC address. Does that do anything?
I ask because sometimes, you need to look at the wifi connections on your mac stuff....Make sure that "Ask to join" is ticked on your devices. Off the top of my head I can't think of anything else.
 

Knuthf

macrumors newbie
Apr 25, 2011
12
0
Blame it on Microsoft

I stand corrected it is a Linksys 2.4 ghz wireless router.

----------



Yes the devices see the network.

I am seeing Mac Address and a Access Point MAC address. Does that do anything?
So you see the SSID - and you have the passcode. You need a passcode if there is a "padlock" in Airport next to the network name - SSID.
Your system administrator can use the MAC, and restrict access to just a list of MAC addresses. If this is the case, given the MAC addresses to the administrator, or connect to the router with a CAT5 cable, and access its WEB port and configure it.
You either have WAP or WPE encryption - look for a padlock after the SSID in the Airport drop-down menu.
The system administrator will have given a key, either as a sequence of hexadecimal characters or some insane key with more than 10 characters.

When all is proper, and you are certain that you have provided the correct key - Airport will handle channel, MAC and your routing to the net. A router is fully functional now, but Microsoft "invented" that they need a set of control packets to supply the same information as NETBIOS. So, your computer is waiting for DNS to give it an IP address - that comes now as a DHCP "packet" - just as in WINS. Only one DHCP server can provide the IP address, whereas any DNS could be used for the same. The next is the set-up of the radio connection, and since MS never implemented full tear-down of a connection, the router needs some extra packets that your MacBook does not understand at all. Neither does Androids or Symbian or Linux.

So, leave the Mac waiting,and reboot the router. When it is done in the right order, your Mac iOS, Android, Symbian and Linux will connect and get the IP address. Sometimes using fixed addresses avoids the problem - edit /etc/passwd - enter 10.0.0.47 MyMac, and drop the request for the IP address.

----------

Is that the same as Data Encryption? Where would I find that?
It is encryption between your Mac and the router.
WPA and WEP is a link encryption that is not more difficult to decipher than that I can hack a WPA network from my mobile that runs Linux. I doubt that Apple will endorse such an App..

Your Internet bank password must be encrypted differently, and so must your secure connection. Consider everything on Airport/WLAN/WiFi to be readable by others.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.