Will Apple be able to fulfill your business / professional needs in the future?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Stella, Apr 9, 2010.

  1. Stella macrumors 604

    Stella

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    #1
    I'm curious about people's thoughts.

    This post isn't obviously aimed towards the average consumer, but power user, or those using OSX for business reasons.

    Anyone worried about the future of Apple, given that:

    Apple have largely failed to make an impact in the business world with OSX and I think this shows, hardware rarely updated ( i.e., XServes, Mac Pros and Macbook Pros no longer the higher end laptop they once were ), no new hardware or software products geared towards non consumer markets.

    However, Apple have been very successful in the consumer world - mobile devices, iPods.

    So, are you worried that Apple will drop their non consumer business -
    * hardware i.e., Mac Pros, XServe
    * dropping support for non consumer software, including dropping support for Java

    Thoughts?

    If you are using OSX for business, professional - i.e., developer targeting multiple platforms - i.e., Java - are you concerned at all?


    In a nutshell - "Are you worried that Apple will stop catering for your professional / business" needs?
     
  2. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #2
    You've just described Apple's direction for at least the past decade.

    Apple plays in the consumer market. By dong so they have built up a war-chest of about $40 billion in spare cash and enjoy a higher market value than Wal Mart. They actually make *more* money in a recession and sell *more* Macs in a recession. Mac sales have hit new records nearly every quarter for quite a while now (well over 20 quarters in succession, if I recall.) And that's just Mac sales. The sales figures and popularity of their other devices speak for themselves. The industry at large regards Apple as *the* innovator in tech today.

    What exactly is there to worry about?

    Are you worried about Apple in particular or about Apple meeting your own needs? The two are vastly different things.
     
  3. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #3
    Every day Apple is becoming less relevant to my work and business.
    Now their products are just used for the fun stuff.

    A pity because I do like the Mac OS and the hardware is lovely…

    I'll continue buying the fun stuff… just not the Pro stuff anymore.
    Using Apple's hardware to generate an income, that will probably be a thing of the past.
     
  4. Stella thread starter macrumors 604

    Stella

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    #4
    What I've described above. Apple dropping all support for non consumer products ( except Video authoring ).

    Of course I'm worried that Apple won't support my needs by going purely consumer and providing zero for anything else. This is not an unreasonable fear.

    OSX is the platform of my choice. Windows irritates the hell of out me, and Linux - while provides a good development environment ( OSX at this point is better IMO ), I wouldn't want to use it as my regular desktop OS.

    If your the average consumer then Apple is great and heading in the right direction, if your using Apple for more then are you worried that Apple will continue to be able to support this need. This is the point of my post.


     
  5. AV8TOR macrumors regular

    AV8TOR

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    #5
    The PC world is not going away, but have you looked at Apple's stock lately?
     
  6. Stella thread starter macrumors 604

    Stella

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    #6
    What has stock price got to do with the point of topic at hand - "Are you fearful that Apple will no longer cater for your professional / business needs"?

    The title of the OP is a bit misleading , but I can't change it now.
     
  7. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #7
    So you're worried about Apple dropping support for XServes and Mac Pros? (the latter of which is also a "consumer" product.)

    Apple has already updated their Pro apps. Those aren't going away. But you'll see, over time, those apps morph into iPad apps and apps for future (more powerful) iPad-like devices as well.

    And there's also this:

    http://www.macrumors.com/2010/03/18...ch-led-cinema-display-mac-pro-update-by-june/

    You need to remember that Apple is not just a "computer" company anymore. They operate in multiple segments of the tech market and have to ensure that each one is given attention. But they can't release new products for each segment all at once. The past little while has been all about the iPad, which is actually a pretty critical area if you look at where tech is moving in the consumer segment. Quite frankly, there is only so far that the classic "big desktop" and "notebook" paradigm can be pushed before they too, being too look smaller, thinner, and perhaps touch-enabled. You can barely sell an average desktop in the consumer market these days. People are looking for power and portability.

    It's the pace of technological change. The line between the average consumer and, say, the professional designer is becoming blurred. You can do things on an inexpensive iPhone photo/image editing app that were only possible with an expensive full-blown desktop application a few years ago. Look at where Photoshop will be with CS5. Images almost correct themselves now (I'm not kidding.) And now these nimble apps that empower the average person are moving to the iPad. That's huge. You won't see the iPad moving into the Enterprise sector like you see generic PCs in companies managed by IT departments (not yet at least, but there's a lot of interest in that.) But you will see Apple handheld devices (especially the iPad) finding homes in a variety of professions, to be used on-the-go, such as in the Medical field.

    Apple has never (in recent memory) given much attention to the Enterprise sector anyway. They never really pushed their XServes and associated products. So if there was never much there in the first place, why worry about it?

    You seem to be worried more about your own needs (and perhaps, artificially, about people like you) rather than about Apple's particular direction, which seems to be a road paved with a lot of future success.
     
  8. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #8
    I work in a business world that is primarily Windows-centric, and more and more the Consumer business of Apple is leaking into this world. There's more and more Macs coming in and being shoe-horned into this Windows-centric world. There's no way they will give up on their half-assed attempt at weaseling into the Enterprise market.
     
  9. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #9
    Oh yes you can.

    To edit your thread title, just click on the [​IMG] button on the bottom right of your original post and then click the "Go Advanced" button below your message.


    To participate in this topic: I don't really have an opinion on this, but I fear, that Apple may loose interest in their normal computer line, but that may be due to their long absence of public attention to their notebooks.
    And since the switch to x86 chipsets, Apple seems to be more focused on consumers than on the professional market, but since they have never promised to do so, what can we do about it anyway.
     
  10. Stella thread starter macrumors 604

    Stella

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    #10
    Will Apple be able to fulfill your business / professional needs in the future?

    No, its more than Apple dropping XServes and Mac Pros, that is too simplistic statement.

    I'm more concerned with are Apple going to drop support for everything not consumer level. Could businesses / more so IT still use Apple hardware effectively.

    Sure, Apple will go where the money is and there's nothing wrong with that - its bad business practice not to. Its great to see Apple doing so well. It would be a shame to see Apple totally give up pushing its machines towards businesses / enterprise.

    Yes, I am worried that is Apple going to fill my needs in the future - and there's nothing wrong with that. I want to be able to continue to use OSX for work and play and love using OSX for both.

    Apple bring out XServes.... and then don't appear to push them much.. so, yes, its a somewhat half - effort.

     
  11. aristobrat macrumors G4

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    #11
    Do you work in IT? I mean, if Apple were pushing them towards companies with IT-needs that involve rackable servers, would you see that effort?

    The products are there, for those that need them.

    XServer are a pretty limited niche, IMO.

    The new Mac mini server that they just introduced this year, ... flipping amazing product for SOHOs (from a hardware/software/support cost perspective). Way more of a market potential than the XServe, IMO.

    They get any credit for that?
     
  12. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #12
    They're not giving up on that at all. The ability to run Windows in tandem with Mac OS X means they're even more appealing to business and enterprises that are WILLING to do support for them.. which is where the model falls apart. It's hard to escape the fact that Macs just plain perceived to cost more money. Yes, you get a good bang for your buck, but the bean counters don't know/don't care. All they know/care is that a lenovo costs 1/2 as much. Couple that with a lot of IT folks who still fall somewhere between "wary" and "downright hateful" of Apple software & hardware, and it's a hard market for Apple to crack.

    Personally, I see what they're doing right now as a Good Thing™ for the future of the enterprise market. I work in the heath care industry and it's hard for the anti-apple, blinders-wearing IT folks around here to ignore the amount of Macs, iPhones, and (soon) iPads that are flowing in through the doors. The glut of consumer products that Apple puts out has really started to push at the boundaries of the Windows status quo.
     
  13. jpyc7 macrumors 6502

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    #13
    What I've seen is that there are always a few people who are "high up" enough to overcome IT department's objections to Apple products. Sure the computer costs more, but that person's salary is many multiples of that difference. If that person feels that the Mac OS makes them more productive, then it's easier to justify given the labor cost.

    I wouldn't be surprised if the high-performance computers are discontinued by Apple. However, the "consumer" grade computers are still productive enough for business use. A senior level engineer at my workplace uses "matlab", a program used for calculations, on a Mac. Sure a high performance computer would compute faster, but most of his time is spent writing the matlab program, not waiting for the "calculation". Obviously for business development tasks like writing powerpoint presentations, documents, spreadsheet, most computers are fast enough. The workers' time is spent writing the document, not waiting for the characters to appear on screen.

    Anyway, I don't use Mac at work currently. I have in the past and I think my productivity was about the same with either type of computer. In most cases, I develop code for either a unix-type OS or a real-time OS. The desktop computer is just a client to a server. Since I've only worked in engineering jobs, we were generally competent enough to fix our own computer problems. BTW, I work in computer network industry.

    I have heard that the Pro machines are used mostly by the media creation industry. Quite frankly, saving 2k per computer doesn't compare to outsourcing animation work to S. Korea. So it is quite possible for Apple to lose the US market in that sector.
     
  14. Melrose Suspended

    Melrose

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    #14
    Yes, hands down. Using OS X allows me to build, test, and deploy websites on any possible system (within reason). This is a far cry from the strain that Windows (multiple versions running on multiple brands) put on my productivity, for which the fault was solely on the OS itself. OS X is reliable, fast, easy to use, and consistent - not to mention well executed and stylish.

    OS X runs all the software I need, and runs it admirably (excepting Photoshop, which I also had trouble with on Windows, ergo, it is not a problem related to OS X). With Fusion, I am able to also runs Windows (XP & 7) from which to test in Internet Explorer and Windows versions of other browsers.

    Macintosh will serve me well for many, many years to come in my current line of work.
     
  15. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #15
    http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Investing/top-stocks/blog.aspx?post=1738428&_blg=1,1738428

    Jim Cramer: Apple’s iPad cracks the business market

    "I don't care if Apple sells out the iPad at its own stores. I don't care if Best Buy sells out the iPad," Jim Cramer writes for TheStreet.com.

    "I care if Glen Tullman buys the iPad, because if he does, then I know Apple will have created its biggest product ever," Cramer reports. "Who is Glen Tullman? He is the chief executive of Allscripts-Misys Healthcare Solutions, the leading maker of software to control costs for doctors and hospitals in the United States."

    Cramer reports, "Tullman told me last night that his company just received its iPads yesterday and is building an app that will allow doctors to walk around with the iPad, clipboard-style, so that they can input prescriptions and data right into the records and right to the pharmacy. It's the first technological product that he says can replace current systems and save money for the company and that the company will most likely be switching to the device en masse."

    Cramer writes, "This is the real deal, the breaking out of the consumer ghetto by Apple and the liberation at the hands of the Dell and Hewlett-Packard taskmasters."

    "A generation of kids brought up on Apple is now getting in charge of major portions of companies and they simply do not understand why they ever have to deal with Dell."
     
  16. belvdr macrumors 603

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    #16
    I hardly see the iPad cracking any business sectors. Sure, there's a niche for some businesses, but with it only supporting iWorks (and from what I read, it's not a pleasant thing) they aren't making any huge gains.

    For this pharma app to work, it needs to work in a heterogeneous environment. Many doctors and pharmacies aren't going to pour money into new technology unless there's an easy migration. For that matter, there are many doctors that do not submit prescriptions electronically at all.
     
  17. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #17

    That's now.. what about in 6 months, 12 months, 2 years?
     
  18. belvdr macrumors 603

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    #18
    If I could see that far out, I would know where to invest. ;)

    Seriously, a good office suite is essential for cracking into any business, because MS Office is the de facto standard. Try changing an organization's office suite and you'll find that extremely difficult. Now, try changing the office suite and the user interface, and it's going to be even worse.

    Those are just the basics. Unless this device is solely filling a single niche, I don't think many businesses are even going to think about it.
     
  19. KingYaba macrumors 68040

    KingYaba

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    #19
    Now that's pretty cool.
     
  20. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #20
    I don't disagree with you at all. The addition of iWorks seemed an afterthought when originally announced.

    Question is, 1) is Microsoft humble enough to try and develop Office for the iPhone OS, or is the chip on their collective shoulder too big, and 2) would Apple approve it for the App store or cook up some half assed excuse why it should be denied?
     
  21. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #21
    This sounds like you are cowering under the bed after hearing your own ghost story. What is the rational basis of your fear?

    There was a time when "enterprise" and computing in general was confined to a big machine in the basement. Visicalc brought personal computers into business. Much of what people call enterprise computing today is centered around the practices of IT. These practices were established to ensure that they would remain employed rather than for you to do your job.

    Ask yourself:
    • What is my job?
    • How do I use a computer to perform my job?
    • Is it currently possible for me to use Apple's products to perform my job?
    The the answer to the last question is "Yes," then there is no reason to expect you answer to change.

    Go and worry no more.
     
  22. RubbishBBspeed macrumors regular

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    #22
    Nice topic thread.

    I'm concerned Apple could be going in a bad direction.

    If stock price and huge profits are all they are concerned with then I hope they get out of the computer game altogether. Apple have proved before hand that they know how to almost break the company. If they're only planing for the future of the youtube generation which have little or no loyalty, want everything for free and don't seem to be bothered about video or music quality or integrity (and by that I mean anyone who was still in school when youtube was invented). Then good luck Apple, have a short lived future. Your stock price will soon fall if you have few repeat purchasing customers.

    In games they are insignificant.

    Office software they are at the track but not in the race.

    To repeat a previous comment of mine, If Apple are getting out of the Pro market then at least tell us so. Then those of us who have stood up in meetings fighting for a Mac Pro set-up justifying delays and unfounded rumours of release dates can at least save some embarrassment in admitting defeat as the money goes in to reallocation no doubt in spite to refurbish the office kitchen or something else equally as pointless.
     
  23. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #23
    Apple to me has always been an company that is primary in the Consumer world and only dabbles in the enterprise world. Almost everything it makes shows this.

    Multiple exchange accounts on an iPhone is so people can have there phone use exchange for both work and home because that is what the consumer wants. Business could care less (if anything they would rather only have 1 exchange account)
     
  24. Stella thread starter macrumors 604

    Stella

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    #24
    That is a bit demeaning statement IMO. I think i explained in the original post.

    I'm also I'm interested in other people's opinions - their thoughts of Apple's direction as they grow into the consumer markets more and more.

    In the past 8 years or so, it seems as though Apple's interest in non-consumer markets has been on a downwards trend. It seemed like its high was in the first few years of OSX - when Apple may have thought the Unix part could have perked up interest. Apple's strong point has always been in Media Content, but even that seems to be waning.

    Today is fine, but you must plan for the future too.
     
  25. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #25
    No, that is a restatement of your irrational fear. What is the rational basis your fear?

    You appear to be living under the delusion that Apple is a one-trick pony. To the contrary, Apple is huge! It has $40 billion in cash alone. Its market capitalization now exceeds that of Wal-Mart and is headed up. Apple has thousands of very smart and dedicated employees. These smart people can walk and chew gum at the same time. Apple expansion into new markets is not cause for fear. To the contrary, it is cause for celebration. While you're cowering in your corner biting your nails, that is exactly what I will be doing--celebrating.
     

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