Will Catalina finally be the end of Lightroom 6?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by FredT2, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. FredT2 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    #1
    I'm still running Lightroom 6, stubbornly refusing to buy in to the Adobe subscription scheme. I bought ON1 Photo Raw 2019 when appeared in December, but I'm not crazy about it. It's a good program and does most of what I need, but I know Lightroom so well, having started from the first beta, that it's an aggravation when something doesn't work the way I am used to. But come September or October I'll have to decide whether to bite the bullet and go full in with ON1 (or something else), swallow my pride and give in to Adobe, or not upgrade to Catalina. What are you other holdouts going to do?
     
  2. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #2
    My solution (and I know I'll get razzzed for it):

    I bought a 2018 Mini. This will be "the last" Mini that will run a 32-bit OS (Mojave).

    This Mini will "forever remain" with Mojave as its internal boot OS.

    This means that ALL of my older 32-bit software will remain accessible in the near-to-mid future for me (I'm almost 70, don't know how much of "a future" I have!).

    I -may- install later versions of the OS onto an EXTERNAL SSD to boot and run from, just to see what's going on.

    But my "main, work Mini" will be kept in a state of "stasis", so I can keep using "the software of the past".

    Aside:
    I know about the issues with new cameras, RAW format, the inability of older OS's to read newer formats, and all o' that. I don't care, because I don't use RAW.

    But that's how I'm going to keep the old software running, hopefully for at least 5 6, 7 or 8 years into my future...
     
  3. deep diver, Jun 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019

    deep diver macrumors 65816

    deep diver

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #3
    It is not clear from your post if you have a real need to upgrade or if this is just a quaetion of getting the "latest and greatest." I never upgrade software or hardware unless there is a compelling reason to do so. It is just not worth the headaches and time that come along with it.
     
  4. mpfuchs macrumors 6502

    mpfuchs

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2014
    Location:
    VA
    #4
    I think you'll be fine with Mojave for at lease another year.
    On my old 2014 MPB, Lightroom didn't do too well with Mojave, so I reverted back to High Sierra and it's fine, I'm still getting security updates now.

    Unless you want Catalina for features, you can still stick with Mojave for at least another year or even longer.
    I've recently been turned on to Exposure X4 from a fellow forum member and while I haven't gotten the trial yet, it looks like it could be a good alternative to Lightroom. And it also offers a Lighroom Migration Tool.
    https://www.alienskin.com/exposure/features/
     
  5. FredT2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    #5
    No need, it's just what I usually do. I'll probably not this time, at least for a while.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 11, 2019 ---
    I'll have to take a look at that. Thanks.
     
  6. robgendreau macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #6
    Having managed computers where we had to insure the use of legacy software, I'd say don't stick in the past. It can be more work than deciding to follow an incremental upgrade path. That might be especially true in photography, where not only do you need to worry about the software for editing and the system, but also new camera equipment and raw support. And it always seemed that when we finally did, inevitably, need to move to new software or systems it was more painful having waited. Not only that, but learning new software that can do what Lr or On1 or similar products can do is a significant investment, so it sorta depends on how much your time is worth.
     
  7. Darmok N Jalad, Jun 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019

    Darmok N Jalad macrumors 68000

    Darmok N Jalad

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Location:
    Tanagra
    #7
    I’m actually curious how Apple will handle this transition. Are they going to continue to support Mojave as the last OS with 32bit support? Wouldn’t be that hard to keep delivering security updates. Maybe we will find out if they have more upgrader holdouts than usual.

    Mojave is a 64bit OS—MacOS/OS X has been 64bit for some time. What Catalina will do is stop running 32bit apps. I’m also not sure how LR6 will handle the change. LR6 is 64bit, but the crummy Adobe update software component is not. You may never manage to install LR6, but it may continue to run if you had it installed before you upgrade. Hard to tell until we get there, but it would not be a good situation since you could never reinstall it if you had problems.
     
  8. dwig macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Location:
    Key West FL
    #8
    <razz> ... </razz>, 'cause there's really nothing about this to razz you for.

    This is pretty much a good idea. I suspect you'll find that having a newer (read: fully supported with security updates) on a a second drive will become necessary sooner than you may think.
     
  9. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #9
    dwig wrote:
    " I suspect you'll find that having a newer (read: fully supported with security updates) on a a second drive will become necessary sooner than you may think."

    Well, here's a verse from an old song (The Waves on the Sea):
    The first on the deck was the captain of the ship
    And a rough-looking fellow was he
    He said "I care no more for my wife and my child,
    Then I do for the fish in the sea."


    Now, take a look at my avatar.

    I've never cared a whit for "security updates" and run old, old versions of the software as I please. My 2010 MacBook Pro still boots and runs Snow Leopard. My 2015 MBP runs fine on El Cap. My 2012 Mini will be on Low Sierra forever.

    Security updates?
    Find someone else to "care" about them.
    I don't.
     
  10. someoldguy macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009
    Location:
    usa
    #10
    I'll probably 'freeze' my Mac Pro 4.1>5.1 on Mojave also . Had some cash put aside from some consulting nonsense that I was going to use for a bottom end new Pro , but not at the current asking price . So I used the cash to pick up a new HP Z2 small form factor to replace an aging
    Z series SFF I use as a low level CAD workstation and for the occasional work stuff . I also use a lot of older software and am not particularly looking forward to seeing what Win 10 breaks on me.
     
  11. Altis macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    #11
    One of the reasons I effectively switched to Windows was to not have to deal with this, IMO significant, drawback. Windows seems to run even very old software without issue, on pretty much any hardware.

    It's bad enough with macOS -- don't even get me started on iOS. :p
     
  12. Darmok N Jalad macrumors 68000

    Darmok N Jalad

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Location:
    Tanagra
    #12
    I just bought a barebones 8C/16T Ivy Bridge-E HP Z420 workstation for really cheap and put in modern graphics and a new SSD. I have Linux Mint on it and so far it has been quite performant for my needs. I may create my own thread on the experience, since it’s an adventure on its own.
     
  13. sananda macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    #14
    My Macs can’t even run Mojave so I’ll continue with Lightroom 6 on El Capitan and High Sierra.
     
  14. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #15
    Hopefully Catalina will be the end of hearing about Lightroom 6 or Aperture. Folks have had years to migrate off them.
     
  15. sananda macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    #16
    Lightroom 6.14 is only about 18 months old.
     
  16. Darmok N Jalad macrumors 68000

    Darmok N Jalad

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Location:
    Tanagra
    #17
    I’ve always felt the subscription model to be too lopsided. It is usually a great deal for the pros and heavy users, but it’s just not economical for casual users. “...but it’s just $10/mo” is not a good argument, as virtually every other corner of our lives is now begging for some sort of monthly payment plan. I have LR6 perpetual in my library, but just knowing that I can’t upgrade it at my leisure someday without resorting to a payment plan has caused me to just stop using it altogether. I’d have to really like LR to spend my money on Adobe these days.
     
  17. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #18
    The knowledge that 6.14 is the last of the standalone releases is older than that. Besides, 18 months is a gracious plenty of time to plan and execute a migration to another app. For years we have had threads about the migration from Lr and Aperture to other apps. There are also videos on Youtube about the subject.
     
  18. bigfatipod macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2011
    #19
    I've learned that "freezing" a computer to use old software is not ideal. I'm an Aperture user and was planning to keep my 2012 mini running it. I've since realized that if my mini breaks, I'm stuck looking for another old machine to run old software. As much as I want to keep running Aperture, thats really not an ideal situation.
     
  19. FredT2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    #20
    This assumes that a satisfactory alternative exists, or has existed during the last year and a half. I have a friend who has a specific set of requirements that only Aperture has been able to fulfill. The issue for him is not time but rather there not being a satisfactory alternative available. For me it's a matter of stubbornness: I'm satisfied with Lightroom 6 and don't want to pay Adobe for something I don't need, namely Photoshop. In my opinion there is still nothing, with the possible exception of Capture One, that matches the functionality of Lightroom. All of that time has done me no good because the right program still doesn't exist.
     
  20. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #21
    "I've learned that "freezing" a computer to use old software is not ideal. I'm an Aperture user and was planning to keep my 2012 mini running it. I've since realized that if my mini breaks, I'm stuck looking for another old machine to run old software."

    Macs that will continue to run 32-bit software will be available in good shape for years to come.

    So long as Apple continues to sell Apple-refurbished 2018 Minis and 2019 iMacs, you'll be able to purchase a 32-bit-capable Mac, complete with Apple warranty.
     
  21. robgendreau macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #22
    I can't imagine what of any significance there could be in ancient Aperture that can't be found in current equivalents. But in any case, your friend is doomed because it's ending and they'll either have to perpetuate old hardware and software and systems to run it or move on.

    I do feel for Lr only users. The more valuable part of Adobe's Photo plan is Photoshop. Not Lr. I thought when Adobe dropped CC vs Classic there'd be a lower cost option for just CC, but since it's kind of like Photos in being a frontend to a cloud data subscription, looks like that won't happen. Might have been part of Apple's reason to jettison Aperture vs say an Aperture Classic and Photos cloud option a al Adobe's. But hey, the photo world is rife with choices like this; the "pro" options cost. Lots. If one wants a somewhat smaller feature set there are alternatives, just as with computers, cameras, lenses, and accessories. At least with software like Lr you can use a stripped down version for free, and something else for say developing raw. Like say Raw Power if one is an Aperture fan.
     

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21 June 11, 2019