Will I be forced to activate in-store?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by scwinsett, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. scwinsett macrumors 6502a

    scwinsett

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #1
    I was wondering since they are shipping phones anyways and letting those people activate themselves, will they let me when I pick mine up at the store? I'd really like to activate on my own, because I make unboxing videos and such... i want my iPhone unopened until i get home.

    I mean, it shouldn't matter, since I'll be signing a renewal contract, AT&T is still gonna get to bill me every month... it shouldn't matter if I never activate it...

    Obviously I'd be activating it immediately, I just want to do it myself.

    Please only answers from people who have some knowledge based on a prior experience or something... I don't need people's random opinions.
     
  2. ScubaCinci macrumors 65816

    ScubaCinci

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    #2
    They will probably activate it in the store unless there are server problems. Check that, there will be server problems so likely you'll be able to take it home without activation :D
     
  3. aristobrat macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #3
    I worked at an Apple Retail store until two months ago, and it has been the policy since the 3G that it has to be activated in the store (unless the customer paid the no-commitment $599/$699 price).

    Part of it is due to in-store activations only staying on AT&Ts server until midnight of the day of sale. If customers went home with an inactivate iPhone, and didn't activate it before midnight, it requires manual intervention from AT&T before it can be activated. Either way, the managers were very stringent that the iPhone be opened and activated in the store.

    I never took the plastic wrapper off of the phone itself when I activated it for the customer. I just unwrapped it enough to plug the USB cable in and activate it.

    So if you want to do an unboxing, ask the Apple employee not to pull the wrapper off the phone. I don't think anyone watching your video is going to be disappointed that the shrink wrap on the retail box was gone before you filmed yours.
     
  4. ntrigue macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    #4
    Based on prior experience they open the plastic wrap and leave the protective wrap on the iPhone. They absolutely need to activate there, that's why it takes so long.
     
  5. scwinsett thread starter macrumors 6502a

    scwinsett

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #5
    Thanks for this answer! That's all I needed to know. I am curious, why did you leave employment? I applied once to work at an Apple Store, but there were about 75 people there for the hiring event, and they never gave anyone an opportunity to prove themselves... we all just sat there and watched videos, and the kids with the "hippest" hairdo's got hired. Maybe that was just my store, but the hiring process is WHACKED. Not just because I didn't get the job, but they didn't even really get enough information to make any real decision. Apple Store employees appear to be paid models to maintain a very specific image, as I never have worked with a "Genius" who was actually able to help
     
  6. matticus008 macrumors 68040

    matticus008

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #6
    The difference is that those having their phones delivered to them have already provided all the account details/payment information to AT&T through a more extensive ordering process.

    Those picking it up in store have not necessarily done so, so unless you pay full price, you have to run it through AT&T's system before you purchase it to confirm that you have started your contract and are eligible for the subsidized price (i.e., the extra step you didn't have to do to make a reservation).

    Otherwise, people could simply preorder, pay $199, and then never start their AT&T contract, leaving AT&T footing the bill for the amount of the subsidy.
     
  7. Nyse macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    #7
    When I got my 3GS last July, it was the last one literally within 100 miles. The fat headed walmart guy drops it when he was putting the sim card in. My gf said the look on my face was priceless, she thought I was going to murder the guy where he stood.

    That's why this year I'm ordering through the mail.

    Does it come with a sim card? Im guessing it does, but it's not already in the phone is it?
     
  8. aristobrat macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #8
    For me, Apple was a PT job that I did for fun, in addition to my FT job. I'm squeezed for time this summer, and leaving Apple was the easiest way to free up some time. I'd go back in a heartbeat, though! :)

    Crap, 75 people?!? My store was a smaller store, so the hiring events were only like 10-15 people. The managers encouraged us (regular employees) to attend the events and get to know the people. We'd then give our feedback back to the managers, who'd add it to theirs, and then bring people back for additional one-on-one interviews (which is where they got additional information).

    The process worked OK for our store, but our staff was already diverse. I mean, age was skewed mostly younger -- I'd guess 70% college-aged, but the rest of the staff went from there up until their late 50s. But everything else (nationality, religion, sexuality, personal style) was totally diverse. So the input that managers got from the hiring events was just as diverse.

    I could see where a store comprised of mostly folks with the same look could end up hiring more of the same look, though. :(

    Definitely no specific image in our store. I mean, there'd be a random shift that'd have *the* 8 emo folks (out of a staff of ~90) working, so if you walked in then, I see how you could think that. But if you saw our store during a quarterly meeting where everyone was there, it's diverse enough, you wouldn't even guess that 75% of them even worked for Apple. The only image our store went for was 'friendly'. They didn't care what your personal style or haircut was.

    As for the Genius thing, most customers (that provide an email address) get an email asking them to rate their visit to the Genius Bar. My store's mgmt was very good about tracking those responses, and if a clear pattern began showing that one of the Geniuses was having problems, they'd deal with it.

    The store I worked at was consistently rated well by the customers (for the Genius Bar, the sales folks, and the One-to-One trainers). Weekly, we were always in the top 5 of our market, which was around 30 stores. Made me wonder what the hell was going on with some of the other stores. :p
     
  9. wishman35 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    #9

    I know where you are coming from, but I am sure it is pretty easy for them to process the sale of the iPhone through their system, scan the serial number on the box, and initiate the contract without ever opening the box.

    I have bought an iPhone at Best Buy before in which they didn't open the box but started the new contract.

    There is no need for them to open it at all.
     
  10. wishman35 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    #10
    This happened to me as well at AT&T ... I wanted to kill him. If they drop the phone, have the decency to give me another one and send that one back.
     
  11. chrisperra macrumors member

    chrisperra

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2006
    Location:
    /dev/null
    #11
    Most Apple employees will respect that wish. They are just as fanatical (most of them) as you are.
     
  12. matticus008 macrumors 68040

    matticus008

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #12
    Sure, but there's no reason for them to set up a system that makes you start up the contract at point of purchase and then go through a separate process to activate the device that you're already standing there, starting a contract and paying for. The idea is that you walk out of the store with a working phone.

    It's also set up to reduce the external Internet traffic to the activation servers, I'm sure, since Apple stores can be set up ahead of time to use a non-public connection. If you really want to do a superfluous unboxing video, it's a simple matter of ordering for delivery or doing the first part of the video in the Apple store.

    You could probably ask them not to open the box; many store employees probably wouldn't have a problem with that as long as you complete the signup and provide a credit card for account billing.
     

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