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Mongol

macrumors member
Original poster
Jun 12, 2012
54
0
also will Apple offer their own SSD upgrade service at some point?
 

Tom G.

macrumors 68020
Jun 16, 2009
2,300
1,284
Champaign/Urbana Illinois
Cisco Kid,

And try to emulate the almost perfect solder job that was done on the original one. I think even I with my Coke Bottle glasses could tell the difference. :D
 
Comment

bryne

macrumors member
Nov 12, 2010
60
0
Los Angeles
It's not considered user-replaceable so it probably will void your warranty. Will they be able to tell? Who knows. There's no "seal".
 
Comment

Mal

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2002
6,249
17
Orlando
If you ever need service just pop the original one back in it

This will be the key, as with current models. Since it's not considered user-serviceable, just save the original part and put it back in if you ever need service. Of course, this is all academic until there's a third-party option actually on the market.

jW
 
Comment

noteple

macrumors 65816
Aug 30, 2011
1,421
357
Yes it will void the original warranty much less AppleCare.

Check out ifixit and see how they could guess that you were in there.

Some day that SSD upgrade form a third party will most likely be available.
it will also be somewhat pricey from the unique form factor and usage limited to rMBP's.
 
Comment

JohnDoe98

macrumors 68020
May 1, 2009
2,488
99
It's not considered user-replaceable so it probably will void your warranty.

Source?

----------

Yes it will void the original warranty much less AppleCare.

Why would it void the warranty? If you purchased a replacement SSD legitimately you are allowed to install it. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects you and clearly states:

MMWA said:
Warrantors cannot require that only branded parts be used with the product in order to retain the warranty. This is commonly referred to as the "tie-in sales" provisions, and is frequently mentioned in the context of third-party computer parts, such as memory and hard drives.

So clearly it can't void the warranty.
noteple said:
Check out ifixit and see how they could guess that you were in there.

Doesn't matter, you are allowed in there.

----------

So there is no seal or anything that voids AppleCare?

No that would be illegal.
 
Comment

vladzaharia

macrumors regular
Jul 5, 2010
213
29
Source?

----------



Why would it void the warranty? If you purchased a replacement SSD legitimately you are allowed to install it. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects you and clearly states:



So clearly it can't void the warranty.


Doesn't matter, you are allowed in there.

----------



No that would be illegal.

Then how can there be seals on just about any electronic product that says "Warranty void if removed" stickers. Look at an Xbox, PS3, even Macbook Pros (the battery). Everything has "warranty void if removed". This isn't about 3rd party parts, this is because of damaging the equipment by trying to perform a repair or upgrade by yourself. They can very easily prevent your ability to repair or upgrade, it's completely legal, and well within their rights.
 
Comment

JohnDoe98

macrumors 68020
May 1, 2009
2,488
99
Then how can there be seals on just about any electronic product that says "Warranty void if removed" stickers. Look at an Xbox, PS3, even Macbook Pros (the battery). Everything has "warranty void if removed". This isn't about 3rd party parts, this is because of damaging the equipment by trying to perform a repair or upgrade by yourself. They can very easily prevent your ability to repair or upgrade, it's completely legal, and well within their rights.

They can't do it on any random part. They can do on it on batteries because if you did cause damage, it would pose a health hazard for them to try to service the computer. Similarly, if you damage parts, your warranty may not cover that damage. However, if there is a malfunction and no signs of damage caused by your putting in third-party parts, they cannot deny your warranty coverage. Putting stickers in there doesn't change the federal law that I referenced.

If you think it is within their rights to deny you coverage, please show us the Law that allows them such liberties. Show us the law that trumps the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.
 
Comment

RealEyes

macrumors regular
Jun 23, 2012
184
0
So, where would you put it?

vkuKGsNkWXXe1BRv.medium
 
Comment

Macman45

macrumors G5
Jul 29, 2011
13,198
133
Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
Yes it will void the original warranty much less AppleCare.

Check out ifixit and see how they could guess that you were in there.

Some day that SSD upgrade form a third party will most likely be available.
it will also be somewhat pricey from the unique form factor and usage limited to rMBP's.

Completely agree, just opening it is going to cause warranty issues...Don't go there unless you are prepared to void it.
 
Comment

vladzaharia

macrumors regular
Jul 5, 2010
213
29
They can't do it on any random part. They can do on it on batteries because if you did cause damage, it would pose a health hazard for them to try to service the computer. Similarly, if you damage parts, your warranty may not cover that damage. However, if there is a malfunction and no signs of damage caused by your putting in third-party parts, they cannot deny your warranty coverage. Putting stickers in there doesn't change the federal law that I referenced.

If you think it is within their rights to deny you coverage, please show us the Law that allows them such liberties. Show us the law that trumps the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

The Apple warranty covers, and I quote:
Apple warrants the Apple-branded hardware product and accessories contained in the original packaging ("Apple Product") against defects in materials and workmanship when used normally in accordance with Apple's published guidelines for a period of ONE (1) YEAR from the date of original retail purchase by the end-user purchaser ("Warranty Period"). Apple’s published guidelines include but are not limited to information contained in technical specifications, user manuals and service communications.

And that the warranty does not apply:
{...}
(c) to damage caused by use with another product;
{...}
(f) to damage caused by service (including upgrades and expansions) performed by anyone who is not a representative of Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider (“AASP”);
{...}

http://www.apple.com/legal/warranty/products/mac-english.html

The warranty provided by Apple is a limited warranty, not a full warranty. Therefore, many provisions of the law will not apply. Furthermore, Apple is not saying "to get warranty, you need to buy Apple parts when you replace that SSD". They're saying "you cannot replace that SSD". There's a clear difference.

While you cannot use a tie-in sales provision, your warranty need not cover use of replacement parts, repairs, or maintenance that is inappropriate for your product. The following is an example of a permissible provision that excludes coverage of such things.

While necessary maintenance or repairs on your AudioMundo Stereo System can be performed by any company, we recommend that you use only authorized AudioMundo dealers. Improper or incorrectly performed maintenance or repair voids this warranty.
http://www.mlmlaw.com/library/guides/ftc/warranties/undermag.htm

Tl;dr: If you try and repair or upgrade, you can seriously damage your Macbook, and therefore, some items are designated as "non user-replaceable". Because of the damage that can result in trying to replace it. It's not a matter of using Apple-branded items, it's a matter of restricting the user-serviceable items in a laptop to ones that will not damage the entire thing if you make a small mistake. Removing that huge battery can cause huge problems.
 
Comment

JohnDoe98

macrumors 68020
May 1, 2009
2,488
99
The Apple warranty covers, and I quote:

First off all, the contract they give you cannot override the law. Second, nice of you to only selectively quote what interests you in a manner that distorts things. Here's what Apple says in a little more detail:

Apple said:
This Limited Warranty applies only to hardware products manufactured by or for Apple that can be identified by the "Apple" trademark, trade name, or logo affixed to them. The Limited Warranty does not apply to any non-Apple hardware products or any software, even if packaged or sold with Apple hardware. Non-Apple manufacturers, suppliers, or publishers may provide their own warranties. Software distributed by Apple under the Apple brand name (including, but not limited to system software) is not covered under this Limited Warranty. Refer to the Apple Software License Agreement for more information. Apple and its Authorized Service Providers are not liable for any damage to or loss of any programs, data, or other information stored on any media, or any non-Apple product or part not covered by this warranty. Recovery and reinstallation of system and application software and user data are not covered under this Limited Warranty. This warranty does not apply: (a) to damage caused by accident, abuse, misuse, misapplication, or non-Apple products; (b) to damage caused by service (including upgrades and expansions) performed by anyone who is not an Apple Authorized Service Provider; (c) to a product or a part that has been modified without the written permission of Apple; or (d) if any Apple serial number has been removed or defaced

It is implied there you can replace your own parts. For the full warranty go here:

http://store.apple.com/Catalog/US/Images/wty-post1997.html

But here is the kicker, even if they didn't want to cover it, if you read the link you actually provided you would have realised your notion of what "limited" means in limited warranties is nonsense. Here is what that site explains regarding the MMWA:

MLM Law said:
The Act prohibits anyone who offers a written warranty from disclaiming or modifying implied warranties. This means that no matter how broad or narrow your written warranty is, your customers always will receive the basic protection of the implied warranty of merchantability. This is explained in Understanding Warranties.

There is one permissible modification of implied warranties, however. If you offer a "limited" written warranty, the law allows you to include a provision that restricts the duration of implied warranties to the duration of your limited warranty. For example, if you offer a two-year limited warranty, you can limit implied warranties to two years. However, if you offer a "full" written warranty, you cannot limit the duration of implied warranties. This matter is explained in Titling Written Warranties as "Full" or "Limited".

So you see "limited" only means less time, nothing else.


vladzaharia said:
Tl;dr: If you try and repair or upgrade, you can seriously damage your Macbook, and therefore, some items are designated as "non user-replaceable". Because of the damage that can result in trying to replace it. It's not a matter of using Apple-branded items, it's a matter of restricting the user-serviceable items in a laptop to ones that will not damage the entire thing if you make a small mistake. Removing that huge battery can cause huge problems.

The point about damage is entirely separate from what we are discussing and what the OP was asking about.
 
Comment

vladzaharia

macrumors regular
Jul 5, 2010
213
29
First off all, the contract they give you cannot override the law. Second, nice of you to only selectively quote what interests you in a manner that distorts things. Here's what Apple says in a little more detail:



It is implied there you can replace your own parts. For the full warranty go here:

http://store.apple.com/Catalog/US/Images/wty-post1997.html

But here is the kicker, even if they didn't want to cover it, if you read the link you actually provided you would have realised your notion of what "limited" means in limited warranties is nonsense. Here is what that site explains regarding the MMWA:



So you see "limited" only means less time, nothing else.




The point about damage is entirely separate from what we are discussing and what the OP was asking about.

Err... My link is even more detailed than yours, and your link still says exactly what I had said. The warranty does not apply (c) to damage caused by service (including upgrades and expansions) performed by anyone who is not an Apple Authorized Service Provider. You will probably damage your RMBP if you open it. You will damage it, and the warranty will be void.

This has nothing to do with the clause you mentioned several times. Apple is not tying you into their product. They know that there is a high likelihood of damage, and they are telling you it is not user serviceable because of that.

Full warranties have quite a few more provisions than just time. There's a lot more in there about what Apple would have to do.

Furthermore, you can't even claim tie-in. It's not an Apple flash chip. It's made by Samsung. Apple is definitely not tying you into their brand Flash Chips because guess what, they don't have any.
 
Comment

yusukeaoki

macrumors 68030
Mar 22, 2011
2,550
6
Tokyo, Japan
It doesnt void the warranty if you open it and replace RAM/SSD.
But it will void it if you mess something up during the process.

Also good luck finding a 512/768GB flash stick...
 
Comment

alphaod

Contributor
Feb 9, 2008
22,179
1,234
NYC
AppleCare is the original warranty.

AppleCare is the 3-year extended protection plan Apple offers in lieu of the standard warranty on Macs. The one year warranty is called the "Apple's One Year Limited Warranty," not AppleCare.

For this reason, some countries that have laws that require Apple to offer say 2-years of protection or 3-years for students, will still only have 90-days of telephone support instead of the 3-year warranty and telephone support offered with the AppleCare Protection Plan.
 
Comment

vladzaharia

macrumors regular
Jul 5, 2010
213
29
For rMBP, RAM is not a replaceable part since its soldered on to the logic.
But for non retina MBP, you can replace both.

The title of the thread is "Will putting in a third party SSD void AppleCare for rMBP?"

Pretty sure this thread is about a rMBP...
 
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