Will the Core M be able to to 3D rendering??

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by ByteTheBooty, Mar 27, 2015.

  1. ByteTheBooty, Mar 27, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2015

    ByteTheBooty macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #1
    So I was taking a look at my university class for next semester and I saw that I will be working with a bunch of coding and 3D Redering type of computer softwares (going in engeneering). I don't know if anyone knows any of those, but I will be using CAD, Autodesk, DiTrace....

    The thing is, I really really really want the MacBook, ever since it came out, I've been wanting it, and now today I just learned that I will be using these software which use 3D stuff. And I remember reading somewhere the the Core M can not do 3D Redering...I mean Its not nescessary to have these softwares, but if I'm buying a computer, one of the benefits should be to have these softwares on my Mac....

    I know nobody knows yet and nothing is for sure, but can the new MacBook do 3D and handle my load?

    I really hope I can stay with the nMB :(
     
  2. Nocturnal22 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 23, 2009
    #2
    It may be able o handle that stuff but it's gonna be a lot slower compared to a rMBP or a 15inch i7 rMBP if you're serious about getting into engineering you should invest in a machine that will fly through what you throw at it imo.
     
  3. AppleWarMachine macrumors 6502a

    AppleWarMachine

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    Sep 27, 2011
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    Michigan, US
    #3
    If your going to be running CAD (like I do), I would go for a rMBP
     
  4. Theophil1971 macrumors 6502

    Theophil1971

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    Mar 20, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    Ya, I'm a big fan of the new rMB. But I'm a writer. For people needing graphically intensive applications, I'd recommend the pro line...
     
  5. ByteTheBooty, Mar 27, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2015

    ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #5
    :(:( you guys seem to be right...but still..

    I still feel that I need to portability of the rMB...this is so sad, I was solo hyped about this computer
     
  6. ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #6
    Since you have used CAD, would you consider it a power consuming application? Do you think it won't work well on the nMB?
     
  7. Theophil1971 macrumors 6502

    Theophil1971

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    Mar 20, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Well, you can always get one, install your apps and try it out. If it suIts your needs, keep it and be stoked. If it doesn't, you have 14 days to return it.
     
  8. dexterbell macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 29, 2015
    #8
    Oh no, an extra 1.5 pound computer! Your poor aching back! #firstworldproblems
     
  9. sonicrobby macrumors 68020

    sonicrobby

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    Apr 24, 2013
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #9
    This is precisely what I was going to do! I currently run solidworks in parallels on my rMBP, it works well on boot camp on the low end 2012 Mac mini, so I'm curious as to how it will handle.

    It bothers me to have the pro computer for a program that I don't use too often, maybe just once a week. So other than solidworks, the rMB would be perfect for all of my other needs.
     
  10. iRun26.2 macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2010
    #10
    I bet you will really like it. You will have a very portable computer and, when you need to do some 3D rendering, you'll just have to wait a little bit longer. It may not be that long after all.
     
  11. crsh1976 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 13, 2011
    #11
    Any laptop, save for pro-grade/workstation-class models, are going to be a slower with 3D apps, but they'll work. Just don't expect stellar performance and you'll be fine.

    The cramped screen would be a bigger concern personally with all the tool bars and panels (same for Adobe apps).
     
  12. iRun26.2 macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2010
    #12
    That should be slightly offset by the retina screen.
     
  13. crsh1976 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 13, 2011
    #13
    Sure, it helps tons - that's why I crank up the resolution to the full 2880x1800 on my 15-inch rMBP - but it makes some things more difficult to read/interact with because everything is much smaller. The level of comfort varies from one person to the next, tho.
     
  14. ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #14
    1.5 extra pound is a lot for someone like me, who carries their computer, a bunch of school books, a lunch and a water bottle on my back THE ENTIRE DAY.
    The MBA was quite heavy for me actually...I used to keep it at home somedays because even though it is light, it still make a big difference fro my back...

    ----------

    Unfortunatly, I dont want to buy a bunch of software that Im not going to use until next year...but i guess i should find some kind of Free software that those this type of 3D suff that I could install to test it out....anyone has an idea of I software worth testing??
     
  15. Pootan macrumors member

    Pootan

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    Oct 28, 2014
    #15
    Hi from my experience in 3d graphics classes in CS and animation school, the kind done in a CS degree will be far less cpu/gpu intense. It'll be mostly testing your knowledge on linear algebra in a 3d environment, even a base mba will do. If you are in a 3d modelling art class with unoptimized massive poly count z brush models, no laptop will save you.
     
  16. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #16
    Let me put it like this: if you are going to do CAD-style work seriously, then no, the MB is not a good machine for you. If its just for a class, it will do ok. It won't be particularly fast or smooth, and its certainly not the best tool for the job, but it will do ok. It just won't take as quickly or be as comfortable as with a faster laptop. A friend of mine used to do hobby 3D modelling on a 2011 MBA. A MB is a much faster machine.
     
  17. AFEPPL macrumors 68030

    AFEPPL

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    Location:
    England
    #17
    Well if it worked "fine" on a 2011 MBA - will be more than fine on the new rMB.

    You could always buy, then try it with the software you want to use and if it doesnt perform the way you want return it for a Pro.
     
  18. ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #18
    I mean the logical smart thing would be to go with a pro...but ill try out the rMB with a similar software like you all are saying.. But its such a shame...I was so sure of my decision with the rMB and invested so much in watching every single hands on video and checking this thread 3-4 times a day..
     
  19. Mr. Buzzcut macrumors 65816

    Mr. Buzzcut

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    Jul 25, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio
    #19
    Not sure how the software's requirements may have changed but I had such classes over two decades ago with labs full of 386 and 486 PCs. Check out the requirements for the software you will need to use and see if the MB will work. If you're doing this for school and not all day for work the performance, assuming adequate to run the software in the first place, isn't likely to make much difference.
     
  20. Shadow Runner macrumors regular

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    Jun 14, 2010
    #20
    If you really want the new rMB, like I do, then you should wait for it to be released and see if you can test first hand the software you will be using on it. The next best thing is to compare bench results that are similarly stressing on the machine as the software is, to other computers like the MBP. If you are not making a living off it, you could get away with reduced performance for the benefit of such a svelte machine.

    I'll be getting away with using it because I have a desktop for more serious work when needed, so there is always that route too.
     
  21. iRun26.2 macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2010
    #21
    We humans don't always have to follow the logical path. I'm sure a rMB would be just fine for anything you are doing in school. Just go ahead and get one and try it out. If it is too slow, then return it. You only live once.

    You sound kind of obsessed about it like me. I use mine for my job and while I don't do 3D modeling, I do CAD and it may push the rMB a little bit. It's my choice. My boss says I can use what I want. I value portability and think that the ability to take it everywhere overrides a slightly slower processor.
     
  22. ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #22
    I am more than obsessed with it...ive been waiting for something like this for 2 years...and I want the most portable thing since I will be carrying all day from 6am to 7am, in the train...
     
  23. iRun26.2 macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2010
    #23
    I couldn't agree with you more. I've been waiting since 2010 to get a retina screen on a 11" MBA. They went even further and put a retina screen on a computer that is even smaller than the MBA 11" and yet it now has a 12" screen.

    I am so excited: Almost like a little kid at Christmas. Sometimes it's good to please the little kid inside of you. :)
     
  24. ByteTheBooty thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 8, 2015
    #24
    I know!!! same for me.. I was so happy with the price...I swear I started screaming when I saw 1299$....I mean for a 4gb 128gb I would have understood, but 8gb AND 256 SSD!?!?! that was a total shocker for me
     
  25. iRun26.2 macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2010
    #25
    The entry point of 256G really surprised me. Last time the entry point for RAM was 2G. Now they start at 8G RAM (although 16G is not an option...too bad).
     

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