Will the next rMBP 'overheat'

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by deany, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. deany macrumors 68030

    deany

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Location:
    North Wales
    #1
    okay when I say overheat I mean fan on 70 degrees
    I use Parallels and W7 and W10
    Will the CPU cause the fan to click on in Parallels - do you think (Parallels 12 not released yet)
     
  2. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #2
    If the CPU is loaded and generating heat, the fan will turn on or run faster to move more air.

    Why do you think that the fan being on indicates something is overheating?
     
  3. deany thread starter macrumors 68030

    deany

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Location:
    North Wales
    #3
    you are asking a rhetorical question.
     
  4. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #4
    No, I honestly want to know why you think that the fans being on mean something is overheating.
     
  5. deany thread starter macrumors 68030

    deany

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Location:
    North Wales
    #5
    Well on my rMBP I get an inital 'alert' from the sound of the fan kicking in. Plus sound alerts from temp apps from apple app store.
    What so you use as your "litmus test" that the rMBP is overheating?
     
  6. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #6
    The computer shuts off unexpectedly.

    Overheating is not the same thing as "running hotter than I'd like" or "the fans making too much noise."
     
  7. deany, Aug 12, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016

    deany thread starter macrumors 68030

    deany

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Location:
    North Wales
    #7
    To be fair my friend, and with respect, you are being a tad pedantic.
    But peace to you and all your loved ones.
    May God's Love be with you always.
     
  8. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #8
    Call it whatever you'd like.

    But, to actually answer the question(s) in your original post:

    Only if something is wrong with it. Overheat, by definition, is when the temperature of something rises above it's maximum operating temperature. On Intel CPUs that Apple uses, that is 105c, so anything below that is not overheating.

    Since you re-define "overheat" to something that doesn't actually mean overheat, you're asking a different question. I think you really just want to know if the next rMBP will run hotter than you'd like it to run. Then answer to that question is "probably."
     
  9. RoboWarriorSr macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2013
    #9
    If you don't want a fan, Apple sells the retina macbook, granted there might be performance issues with parallel depending on the application running on it.
     
  10. Queen6, Aug 13, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Enjoying Better Things
    #10
    Right now no one knows, equally it`s highly likely Apple will choose to run the CPU/dGPU as close to the upper thermal limit as possible, as Apple`s perceived target audience will not push the notebook for the most part. We see this over and over with the 15" MBP, being one of Apple`s most unreliable products...

    Personally I will skip the first Gen and wait on the Kaby Lake, this will give Apple time to work out the kinks. Thiner & lighter is all very good, equally smaller heat syncs are far more prone to loosing efficiency due to the reduced surface area, which directly results in greater fan noise and ultimately throttling.

    I also want to see how Apple deals with the battery as my own 2015 1.2 Retina MacBook battery is showing significantly more wear than my older 13" & 15" MacBook Pro`s in a far shorter period of time & cycles, with portable being the operative word.

    Q-6
     
  11. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #11
    The skylake chipsets do run cooler, and while my iMac runs a lot cooler then the previous generation, if I push the CPU, doing something intensive, the fans will kick in.

    I think that's what you'll see with the MBP, though it may take more work to see the temps rise to the point where the fans ramp up, it will occur.

    Also consider Apple's obsession with thinness, and its very likely that the new MBP will be thinner then the current gen, which has serious implications with heat removal, less space equals more heat trapped, so while the Skylake chipsets will run cooler, apple may make harder to to keep it cooler with a thin design
     
  12. deany thread starter macrumors 68030

    deany

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Location:
    North Wales
    #12
    Thanks for your informative post, much appreciated.
     
  13. maratus, Aug 13, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2016

    maratus macrumors 6502a

    maratus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #13
    If you ask if it'll be possible to reach 70C on the CPU core (and the corresponding fan speed) with your workload - I'd say yes, highly likely. 70C isnt that high for a temperature under load of a full-sized 15". 70C on a CPU under reasonable load isn't even close to overheating.

    Overheating means that CPU throttles (> 98C) under load (typically close to the max load on all cores / threads) and 100% fan speed and typical room temperature. Since the new chassis will be thinner, it'll most likely result in an even less powerful heatsink so I wouldn't have my hopes high. If my past experience is of any indication, the new rMBP cooling system will be barely enough to handle the CPU under 100% load without dGPU. If you start stressing dGPU, it will go outside of chassis's thermal envelope and both CPU and GPS will overheat and start throttling.

    I know that the new generation is more power efficient, but you can't cheat physics. Also a lot of this efficiency goes into allowing higher performance for the same TDP.

    And due to the chassis redesign it's impossible to say if the new rMBP will run cooler/hotter than the current generation under the same load
     
  14. PKBeam macrumors regular

    PKBeam

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    #14
    Honestly, how much space could they possibly shave off the rMBP?

    Apple's site tells me that the rMB at its thickest is >5 mm thinner (some of that is ostensibly from the lid). And we know Apple isn't switching to a tapered design. I don't specialise in thermodynamics but I doubt the 2016 MBP will differ too much from the current model in thermals unless Apple really messes with the insides.
     
  15. wegster macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    #15
    This is my expectation as well...in part due to the 'thinner and lighter,' but we also went through this when the current unibody generation came out - which probably drove more downloads of iStats, smcfancontrol and similar than any prior macbook release.

    I am hopeful that they don't go too far down the path of form over function/capability to the point that capability is diminished or reduced as a result, but - it's Apple, and 'lighter and thinner' seems to be goal 1.

    We'll see. With the # of dGPU issues Apple has seen, and owning one of the impacted models of the current 'quality bulletin'/recall/<whatever you'd like to call it>, I'm already waffling between maxxed out MBP w/dGPU or maxed without dGPU.
     

Share This Page