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George Dawes

Suspended
Jul 17, 2014
2,980
4,331
=VH=
Go 32" mini/micro led , really go for it like in the old days ( SJ ) , not just another tim cook bean counting exercise please
 

fasted227

macrumors newbie
Jan 28, 2023
1
4
No!
They’re simply is no need for all in ones for professionals these days.
There is still a need for good quality Thunderbolt displays, very few good options out there. But the laptops and studios are definitely the way forwards.
Speak for yourself. there are plenty of pro's (who probably make a way better living than you, including myself) who use high end iMacs.
 

unsui_grep

macrumors member
Jan 6, 2019
82
68
So when is that M2 iMac Pro 2023 coming out? June? 😀
I wish but doesn't sound likely. Probably end of the year at best. Seems like a larger iMac or iMac Pro is waiting on M3 chips. The M2 Pro/Max chips were reportedly ready end of 22, so sounds like end of the year early next is most likely.
 
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GalileoSeven

macrumors 6502a
Jan 3, 2015
599
827
Between high end Mac Mini configs, the Studio and now the Pro, where do you expect to fit one in price-wise??

I don't think Apple is totally averse to a little sales canibalization, but given the time, money and effort they've sunk (and continue to sink) into the 3 above mentioned products.....yeah, I highly doubt they're going to bring back the 27" (even if the margins on the 'Pro' were comparable to the Studio)
 

crsh1976

macrumors 68000
Jun 13, 2011
1,598
1,829
Between high end Mac Mini configs, the Studio and now the Pro, where do you expect to fit one in price-wise??

I don't think Apple is totally averse to a little sales canibalization, but given the time, money and effort they've sunk (and continue to sink) into the 3 above mentioned products.....yeah, I highly doubt they're going to bring back the 27" (even if the margins on the 'Pro' were comparable to the Studio)
There's a pricing overlap where the upgraded Mini M2 Pro costs as much as the base Studio M2 Max, but it pretty much stops there as the Mini cannot handle more than 32 GB of RAM and cannot be configured with a M2 Max chip - the price just means that instead of throwing more upgrades into the Mini, it makes more sense to go with the Studio instead.

I think you can configure the Studio M2 Ultra with slick options before it threads on Mac Pro M2 Ultra pricing territory tho.
 
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dandeco

macrumors 65816
Dec 5, 2008
1,218
1,022
Brockton, MA
Given how the iMac is now fundamentally a MacBook Air or 13" MacBook Pro as an all-in-one desktop, and since my college's video editing lab's 2017 Retina 4K 21" iMacs will not be able to support Mac OS 14 Sonoma, they're going to need to find a suitable replacement for those 4K editing powerhouses (they're the top-of-the-line 21.5" model with 3.4 GHz quad-core i5 processors, 16 GB of RAM, AMD Radeon Pro 560 graphics cards with 4 GB VRAM, and 256 GB SSDs). The M1 iMac is usually a nice choice for school/college computer labs, but for a multimedia lab like this, even with the 8-core graphics and 16 GB of RAM, it might not be enough for very heavy-duty video work (though my M1 MacBook Air with the same specs handles 1080p video editing and rendering exceptionally well); plus, they'll want more I/O options besides Thunderbolt/USB-C. They're looking to either get M2 Pro-equipped Mac Minis, or Mac Studios. They can easily reuse the wired Apple keyboards and mice currently in use with the existing iMacs (left over from when they bought 24" iMacs in the summer of 2009), but they'll still need new displays. They could get decent large third-party HD monitors to use with these kind of Mac desktops. The Mac Studio would also have the convenience of a built-in SD card reader, but otherwise shares the same kind of ports as the M2 Pro Mac Mini. (Though if they go with the Minis, the studio could definitely provide SD card readers for those who don't want to directly transfer the footage from camera via USB.)
 
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Longplays

Suspended
May 30, 2023
1,308
1,157
Given how the iMac is now fundamentally a MacBook Air or 13" MacBook Pro as an all-in-one desktop, and since my college's video editing lab's 2017 Retina 4K 21" iMacs will not be able to support Mac OS 14 Sonoma, they're going to need to find a suitable replacement for those 4K editing powerhouses (they're the top-of-the-line 21.5" model with 3.4 GHz quad-core i5 processors, 16 GB of RAM, AMD Radeon Pro 560 graphics cards with 4 GB VRAM, and 256 GB SSDs). The M1 iMac is usually a nice choice for school/college computer labs, but for a multimedia lab like this, even with the 8-core graphics and 16 GB of RAM, it might not be enough for very heavy-duty video work (though my M1 MacBook Air with the same specs handles 1080p video editing and rendering exceptionally well); plus, they'll want more I/O options besides Thunderbolt/USB-C. They're looking to either get M2 Pro-equipped Mac Minis, or Mac Studios. They can easily reuse the wired Apple keyboards and mice currently in use with the existing iMacs (left over from when they bought 24" iMacs in the summer of 2009), but they'll still need new displays. They could get decent large third-party HD monitors to use with these kind of Mac desktops. The Mac Studio would also have the convenience of a built-in SD card reader, but otherwise shares the same kind of ports as the M2 Pro Mac Mini. (Though if they go with the Minis, the studio could definitely provide SD card readers for those who don't want to directly transfer the footage from camera via USB.)
Any M1 or M2 Mac, especially with active cooling, will run rings around any Intel Mac unless the use case changes.

I wouldn't be that worried about the iMac M1 5nm being outclassed by a 4yo 14nm computer no matter how awe inspiring its parts were in 2017.

Be aware that a iMac M2 is likely be released within 4 months.
 
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Suzzzabelle

macrumors member
Nov 16, 2022
49
85
Given how the iMac is now fundamentally a MacBook Air or 13" MacBook Pro as an all-in-one desktop, and since my college's video editing lab's 2017 Retina 4K 21" iMacs will not be able to support Mac OS 14 Sonoma, they're going to need to find a suitable replacement for those 4K editing powerhouses (they're the top-of-the-line 21.5" model with 3.4 GHz quad-core i5 processors, 16 GB of RAM, AMD Radeon Pro 560 graphics cards with 4 GB VRAM, and 256 GB SSDs). The M1 iMac is usually a nice choice for school/college computer labs, but for a multimedia lab like this, even with the 8-core graphics and 16 GB of RAM, it might not be enough for very heavy-duty video work (though my M1 MacBook Air with the same specs handles 1080p video editing and rendering exceptionally well); plus, they'll want more I/O options besides Thunderbolt/USB-C. They're looking to either get M2 Pro-equipped Mac Minis, or Mac Studios. They can easily reuse the wired Apple keyboards and mice currently in use with the existing iMacs (left over from when they bought 24" iMacs in the summer of 2009), but they'll still need new displays. They could get decent large third-party HD monitors to use with these kind of Mac desktops. The Mac Studio would also have the convenience of a built-in SD card reader, but otherwise shares the same kind of ports as the M2 Pro Mac Mini. (Though if they go with the Minis, the studio could definitely provide SD card readers for those who don't want to directly transfer the footage from camera via USB.)

24” iMac. Just say NO.
 

dandeco

macrumors 65816
Dec 5, 2008
1,218
1,022
Brockton, MA
24” iMac. Just say NO.
In a regular computer lab for doing classwork on, the 24" M1 iMacs are just fine for that...
ccwhkadsgv371.jpg

They also have that retro charm reminiscent of school computer labs using the colored iMac G3s.
But for a multimedia lab of some kind (digital graphics design, audiovisual creation, etc.), they'd be better off with Mac Studios or M2 Pro Mac Minis; they could even be hooked up to decent third-party HD monitors, and a slightly better variety of ports (with the Mac Studio, students can import footage from their cameras using SD cards by simply taking out the card and sliding it into the built-in SD card reader, as it's definitely faster than hooking up the camera to the computer via USB).
 

Longplays

Suspended
May 30, 2023
1,308
1,157
In a regular computer lab for doing classwork on, the 24" M1 iMacs are just fine for that...
ccwhkadsgv371.jpg

They also have that retro charm reminiscent of school computer labs using the colored iMac G3s.
But for a multimedia lab of some kind (digital graphics design, audiovisual creation, etc.), they'd be better off with Mac Studios or M2 Pro Mac Minis; they could even be hooked up to decent third-party HD monitors, and a slightly better variety of ports (with the Mac Studio, students can import footage from their cameras using SD cards by simply taking out the card and sliding it into the built-in SD card reader, as it's definitely faster than hooking up the camera to the computer via USB).
The iMac's really designed for that market.

iMac-G3-Hero1.jpg


apple_new-imac-spring21_hero_04202021_Full-Bleed-Image.jpg.large.jpg
 

dandeco

macrumors 65816
Dec 5, 2008
1,218
1,022
Brockton, MA
The iMac's really designed for that market.

iMac-G3-Hero1.jpg


apple_new-imac-spring21_hero_04202021_Full-Bleed-Image.jpg.large.jpg
Exactly! When I first saw the M1 iMacs being announced, I immediately thought of the iMac G3s. Of course, also like the iMac G3s (FireWire-equipped models), the M1 iMacs are also good for basic-to-moderate video editing. Even with 8-core graphics and 16 GB of RAM, they can handle 1080p HD video editing pretty well, like my MacBook Air with the same specs. But of course for a multimedia lab like my college's TV studio has, they'll want something beefier, hence them getting early-2009 24" iMacs with the top-of-the-line configuration in the summer of 2009, then replacing them in summer 2017 with the then-new Retina 4K 21.5" iMacs in their top-of-the-line configuration, with 16 GB of RAM and 256 GB SSDs (originally they were going to get 27" Retina iMacs, as at the time only they had dedicated graphics cards, but that June when Apple refreshed the iMac line and the Retina 21.5" iMacs began using dedicated graphics again, they opted for those).
 
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