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TH55

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Nov 5, 2011
3,328
152
I can’t see how it wouldn’t but I really want to jailbreak
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,377
515
Don’t know about performance, but it will surely decrease battery life. It seems people are getting 5-6 hours of SOT on iOS 14, whereas the most common results on iOS 11 were 8-9 hours. I don’t know how much you’re getting, though. If you’re happy, I wouldn’t update. Three versions at once? You’ll notice the difference, and it will probably be significant.
 

Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
Don’t know about performance, but it will surely decrease battery life. It seems people are getting 5-6 hours of SOT on iOS 14, whereas the most common results on iOS 11 were 8-9 hours. I don’t know how much you’re getting, though. If you’re happy, I wouldn’t update. Three versions at once? You’ll notice the difference, and it will probably be significant.
This is incorrect. Battery life is not dependent on the OS update itself. Battery drain depends on a lot of factors including cell network reception, third party apps installed and overall battery health. Your battery health won’t change as the result of the upgrade (although the percentage may change since it re-calculates during the update). You should not notice a battery life difference, especially if you wipe your phone clean (restore) to iOS 14 (which is what you need to do to unjailbreak).
 

aakshey

Contributor
Jun 13, 2016
2,777
1,271
This is incorrect. Battery life is not dependent on the OS update itself. Battery drain depends on a lot of factors including cell network reception, third party apps installed and overall battery health. Your battery health won’t change as the result of the upgrade (although the percentage may change since it re-calculates during the update). You should not notice a battery life difference, especially if you wipe your phone clean (restore) to iOS 14 (which is what you need to do to unjailbreak).

You’re 100% wrong in every way.
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,377
515
This is incorrect. Battery life is not dependent on the OS update itself. Battery drain depends on a lot of factors including cell network reception, third party apps installed and overall battery health. Your battery health won’t change as the result of the upgrade (although the percentage may change since it re-calculates during the update). You should not notice a battery life difference, especially if you wipe your phone clean (restore) to iOS 14 (which is what you need to do to unjailbreak).
All this is utterly and completely false. OP, please disregard this. Or don’t, and then you’ll come here and say “I really thought the iOS update was gonna be fine, now my battery life is 35% lower than it used to be”.
 
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FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,377
515
Nope, he isn't.

People here have hilarious imaginations about what affects their battery life. "Using the device" never seems to factor in, somehow.
“Hilarious imaginations”. Nope, simply testing and experience. Apple forced my iPad Pro 9.7 from iOS 9 to iOS 12. Immediately, battery life plummeted by over 40%.

I’m not making this up, a three-version jump will severely decrease battery life. Just like it did on my iPad.
 
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krifor03

macrumors member
Sep 24, 2020
74
85
“Hilarious imaginations”. Nope, simply testing and experience. Apple forced my iPad Pro 9.7 from iOS 9 to iOS 12. Immediately, battery life plummeted by over 40%.

I’m not making this up, a three-version jump will severely decrease battery life. Just like it did on my iPad.
oh snap maybe iOS 14 can increase it by 80%! since you know....software can affect the PHYSICAL properties of a battery - smdh....what are they teaching you kids?
 

Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
You’re 100% wrong in every way.
How am I wrong? An OS update that’s been thoroughly tested for battery efficiency suddenly has a battery drain problem because the user upgraded from a old version of iOS? No chance. Outside some cleanup work immediately after the OS update, battery life is solely dependent on the user’s phone configuration (what apps he uses most, using it more after an OS update to play with features, third party apps installed, etc.) He has to restore in iTunes anyway, which reinstalls the entire OS, not a delta OTA update.

In addition, there are over 500,000 apps in the App Store. Do the math on the number of combinations of apps are installed on a phone. I’m sure Apple tests their OS builds with zero third party apps installed. Every update they ship passes that test. So again, how is it the OS?
 

Nozuka

macrumors 68040
Jul 3, 2012
3,037
4,729
I still end the day at about 40% battery, which is not much worse than when i got it. So i doubt you will notice much difference.

(Even though battery is at 90% capacity now, from aging)
 

bmac4

macrumors 601
Feb 14, 2013
4,361
1,464
Atlanta Ga
How am I wrong? An OS update that’s been thoroughly tested for battery efficiency suddenly has a battery drain problem because the user upgraded from a old version of iOS? No chance. Outside some cleanup work immediately after the OS update, battery life is solely dependent on the user’s phone configuration (what apps he uses most, using it more after an OS update to play with features, third party apps installed, etc.) He has to restore in iTunes anyway, which reinstalls the entire OS, not a delta OTA update.

In addition, there are over 500,000 apps in the App Store. Do the math on the number of combinations of apps are installed on a phone. I’m sure Apple tests their OS builds with zero third party apps installed. Every update they ship passes that test. So again, how is it the OS?

So why did Apple tell people they needed to wipe there phones and restore from backup to fix a battery drain issue with iOS 14? Updates do in fact effect battery life. How could they not? New features that the phone was not developed for. Doesn’t mean they don’t work.
 

Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
So why did Apple tell people they needed to wipe there phones and restore from backup to fix a battery drain issue with iOS 14? Updates do in fact effect battery life. How could they not? New features that the phone was not developed for. Doesn’t mean they don’t work.
Do you think Apple only develops features (and tests, for that matter), on the newest iPhones? Was iOS 14 only made for the iPhone 12? It would be a PR nightmare if they released an update for older iPhones without thoroughly testing it. It’s not like they test it only on the iPhone 12 and say “Yep, let’s ready for iPhone 6s and newer!” Imagine if the update didn’t install properly on a 6s and a ton of people updated and thought it was alright? Huge nightmare. They test on each device and test it rigorously.

Back to my original point, if iOS 14’s battery test results were the equivalent of iOS 13’s before it, then it’s ready from a power standpoint. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t ship since it degrades user experience. They could only test battery efficiency on their own code; no third party apps installed. If you have a drain problem after an update, it’s a third party app since the combination of apps a user has on their phone is unique to them and couldn’t be replicated internally at Apple.
 

bmac4

macrumors 601
Feb 14, 2013
4,361
1,464
Atlanta Ga
Do you think Apple only develops features (and tests, for that matter), on the newest iPhones? Was iOS 14 only made for the iPhone 12? It would be a PR nightmare if they released an update for older iPhones without thoroughly testing it. It’s not like they test it only on the iPhone 12 and say “Yep, let’s ready for iPhone 6s and newer!” Imagine if the update didn’t install properly on a 6s and a ton of people updated and thought it was alright? Huge nightmare. They test on each device and test it rigorously.

Back to my original point, if iOS 14’s battery test results were the equivalent of iOS 13’s before it, then it’s ready from a power standpoint. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t ship since it degrades user experience. They could only test battery efficiency on their own code; no third party apps installed. If you have a drain problem after an update, it’s a third party app since the combination of apps a user has on their phone is unique to them and couldn’t be replicated internally at Apple.

Again why did Apple issue a fix to battery drain on iOS 14? If it wasn’t iOS 14 being the issue, why would Apple release a fix? My 11 pro still took a hit on iOS 14. My 12 pro with a smaller battery is better. Seems iOS updates do in fact effect battery life.
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,377
515
Do you think Apple only develops features (and tests, for that matter), on the newest iPhones? Was iOS 14 only made for the iPhone 12? It would be a PR nightmare if they released an update for older iPhones without thoroughly testing it. It’s not like they test it only on the iPhone 12 and say “Yep, let’s ready for iPhone 6s and newer!” Imagine if the update didn’t install properly on a 6s and a ton of people updated and thought it was alright? Huge nightmare. They test on each device and test it rigorously.

Back to my original point, if iOS 14’s battery test results were the equivalent of iOS 13’s before it, then it’s ready from a power standpoint. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t ship since it degrades user experience. They could only test battery efficiency on their own code; no third party apps installed. If you have a drain problem after an update, it’s a third party app since the combination of apps a user has on their phone is unique to them and couldn’t be replicated internally at Apple.
If you have ever, ever, ever, ever (ever), used an iOS device that was updated several times, you should know this is not true.
 
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Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
Again why did Apple issue a fix to battery drain on iOS 14? If it wasn’t iOS 14 being the issue, why would Apple release a fix? My 11 pro still took a hit on iOS 14. My 12 pro with a smaller battery is better. Seems iOS updates do in fact effect battery life.
There isn’t a battery issue on iOS 14 by itself. There’s a bug in the health app where there may be a syncing issue. Other symptoms of the bug include missing GPS data on Apple Watch after a workout. Because of syncing problems, the phone and corresponding watch could get into an infinite sync loop, causing the phone to never sleep and drain the battery. Again, some people only exhibit missing health data whereas others may have an infinite sync to go along with it. This bug isn’t labeled a battery drain issue. It’s labeled as a health-related issue. I for one don’t have this bug and thus I have no drain problem on iOS 14. It’s within 10% of iOS 13 using the same combination of apps and roughly the same usage times. This is why Apple is telling users to wipe and re-pair their watch (and/or phone) since it only affects certain combinations of devices, not everybody.

In OP’s situation, he needs to restore in iTunes/Finder anyway since he’s jailbroken. He will never come across this bug since he’s forced to do a clean install anyway which is the resolution Apple gave.
 

Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
If you have ever, ever, ever, ever (ever), used an iOS device that was updated several times, you should know this is not true.
I have in fact, and done OTA updates from iOS 10 to iOS 13 in the past, zero drain. It’s true. Your particular phone setup and combination of apps are causing your problem.
 
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IsaacM

macrumors 6502
Jul 8, 2011
331
817
Do you think Apple only develops features (and tests, for that matter), on the newest iPhones? Was iOS 14 only made for the iPhone 12? It would be a PR nightmare if they released an update for older iPhones without thoroughly testing it. It’s not like they test it only on the iPhone 12 and say “Yep, let’s ready for iPhone 6s and newer!” Imagine if the update didn’t install properly on a 6s and a ton of people updated and thought it was alright? Huge nightmare. They test on each device and test it rigorously.

Back to my original point, if iOS 14’s battery test results were the equivalent of iOS 13’s before it, then it’s ready from a power standpoint. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t ship since it degrades user experience. They could only test battery efficiency on their own code; no third party apps installed. If you have a drain problem after an update, it’s a third party app since the combination of apps a user has on their phone is unique to them and couldn’t be replicated internally at Apple.

I'm sorry, but no. iOS updates are WELL known to reduce battery life on older devices. Everyone who ever used an iPhone for over 2 years will tell you this.

And yes, even if you get a new battery and do a fresh reinstall it will still give you less hours than you had on the original OS release for that phone.
 

Dougteeshot

Cancelled
Sep 13, 2017
66
111
I'm sorry, but no. iOS updates are WELL known to reduce battery life on older devices. Everyone who ever used an iPhone for over 2 years will tell you this.

And yes, even if you get a new battery and do a fresh reinstall it will still give you less hours than you had on the original OS release for that phone.
Totally disagree. I have no personal experience that proves that, plus Apple engineers don’t write bloated code that’s unoptimized. iOS is very power efficient at its core, from cocoa touch down to the kernel to “sip” power compared to chug it. There’s no code in iOS that says “on iPhone 6s, use 2 watts of power. On iPhone 12, use .25 watts”. It just doesn’t happen and totally pointless. Before blaming the OS, run the OS without any third party apps installed and show us your battery life. I’ll bet you it would be very good. Third party developers need to write more optimized code. Less lines of code = faster performance = easier on the battery.
 

IsaacM

macrumors 6502
Jul 8, 2011
331
817
Totally disagree. I have no personal experience that proves that, plus Apple engineers don’t write bloated code that’s unoptimized. iOS is very power efficient at its core, from cocoa touch down to the kernel to “sip” power compared to chug it. There’s no code in iOS that says “on iPhone 6s, use 2 watts of power. On iPhone 12, use .25 watts”. It just doesn’t happen and totally pointless. Before blaming the OS, run the OS without any third party apps installed and show us your battery life. I’ll bet you it would be very good. Third party developers need to write more optimized code. Less lines of code = faster performance = easier on the battery.

There is no code, but there are different chips.

A12 chip will spend more battery life to run a latest version of IOS because it isn't as power efficient as the latest chip for the power hungry new version of IOS.
 

thadoggfather

macrumors G5
Oct 1, 2007
14,130
13,558
I can’t see how it wouldn’t but I really want to jailbreak
I would probably give it a whirl anyways. From iOS 11 to 14 is a big leap in features, stock.

From a jailbreak standpoint, 14.x is not currently jailbreakable on iPhone X.

While A9-11 has a permanent hw exploit with checkra1n, only A9 has implemented support right now.

A10 is being worked on for the next few weeks. and A11 not yet known.

iOS 14 broke the way it works:
 

bmac4

macrumors 601
Feb 14, 2013
4,361
1,464
Atlanta Ga
There isn’t a battery issue on iOS 14 by itself. There’s a bug in the health app where there may be a syncing issue. Other symptoms of the bug include missing GPS data on Apple Watch after a workout. Because of syncing problems, the phone and corresponding watch could get into an infinite sync loop, causing the phone to never sleep and drain the battery. Again, some people only exhibit missing health data whereas others may have an infinite sync to go along with it. This bug isn’t labeled a battery drain issue. It’s labeled as a health-related issue. I for one don’t have this bug and thus I have no drain problem on iOS 14. It’s within 10% of iOS 13 using the same combination of apps and roughly the same usage times. This is why Apple is telling users to wipe and re-pair their watch (and/or phone) since it only affects certain combinations of devices, not everybody.

In OP’s situation, he needs to restore in iTunes/Finder anyway since he’s jailbroken. He will never come across this bug since he’s forced to do a clean install anyway which is the resolution Apple gave.

How would you like to explain the fact that my 11 pro drains battery faster than my 12 pro with a smaller battery?
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,377
515
I have in fact, and done OTA updates from iOS 10 to iOS 13 in the past, zero drain. It’s true. Your particular phone setup and combination of apps are causing your problem.
I don’t believe you. I haven’t seen a single instance of a device severely updated that retained the battery life of the original version.

The setup is not the issue.
 
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