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Applenoob34

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Feb 18, 2014
345
122
i would love to get an AT4k but my internet speed is a joke. What in the world would be the reason we couldn’t download movies to the AT? We can do it on every other device. Am I missing something?

I’d love to be able to download a 4K movie overnight and watch it at my leisure on my 4K tv.
 

lvavila

macrumors member
Jun 9, 2013
56
36
For now, download to Mac and stream to AT4K. I'm not a 4K customer so Im not sure Mac to ATV will retain 4K.
 

Anonymous Freak

macrumors 603
Dec 12, 2002
5,571
1,300
Cascadia
For now, download to Mac and stream to AT4K. I'm not a 4K customer so Im not sure Mac to ATV will retain 4K.

Max quality you can download to iTunes on a computer is 1080p, no HDR. 4K / HDR is only available via streaming to an ATV4K.

But downloaded 1080p streaming works fine. You just run iTunes on the computer, and select "Computers" from the AppleTV menu. You have to have "Home Sharing" turned on for the same AppleID account on all devices.
 

Macalicious2011

macrumors 68000
May 15, 2011
1,791
1,819
London
Eventually downloading or heavy catching e.g 3-6GB of a movie cached the second it's purchased or rented.

I'm pretty certain of it as who want 4K movies downgraded to HD because of a less-than-perfect internet connection.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,934
3,058
What in the world would be the reason we couldn’t download movies to the AT?

A 1080p DTS-MA movie Blu-Ray when ripped runs about 20-30 GB. An uncompressed 4K movie runs about 100 GB. You have space to download maybe 2 non-compressed movies on a 64 GB Apple TV and there is no space for even 1 4K movie.

If you use the heavily compressed (audio greatly compromised) 1080p or 4K streams used by Netflix (and I assume iTunes) the sizes are better. Something like 4.7 GB an hour, so lets just call it 10 GB for a full 2 hour movie. 4K can be 18.8 GB/hour, 37.6 GB for a 2 hour movie, although h.265 may cut than down to 9 GB an hour, so let's call it 20 GB. So you're talking no more than 6 1080p or 3 4K compressed movies.

but my internet speed is a joke

And if your internet speed is so slow, how long is it going to take you to download such large files? 60 GB at 2 Mbps is going to take something like 71 hours. And do you have a data cap? I backup my media server to the cloud so I burn between 2-3 TB of data a month.
 

Applenoob34

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Feb 18, 2014
345
122
A 1080p DTS-MA movie Blu-Ray when ripped runs about 20-30 GB. An uncompressed 4K movie runs about 100 GB. You have space to download maybe 2 non-compressed movies on a 64 GB Apple TV and there is no space for even 1 4K movie.

If you use the heavily compressed (audio greatly compromised) 1080p or 4K streams used by Netflix (and I assume iTunes) the sizes are better. Something like 4.7 GB an hour, so lets just call it 10 GB for a full 2 hour movie. 4K can be 18.8 GB/hour, 37.6 GB for a 2 hour movie, although h.265 may cut than down to 9 GB an hour, so let's call it 20 GB. So you're talking no more than 6 1080p or 3 4K compressed movies.



And if your internet speed is so slow, how long is it going to take you to download such large files? 60 GB at 2 Mbps is going to take something like 71 hours. And do you have a data cap? I backup my media server to the cloud so I burn between 2-3 TB of data a month.
I get about 15mbps. I would download the movie when im not home or when sleeping. I download ps4 updates and games no problem doing this.
 

benji888

macrumors 68000
Sep 27, 2006
1,889
410
United States
The answer to your headline question is no.

A 1080p DTS-MA movie Blu-Ray when ripped runs about 20-30 GB. An uncompressed 4K movie runs about 100 GB. You have space to download maybe 2 non-compressed movies on a 64 GB Apple TV and there is no space for even 1 4K movie.

If you use the heavily compressed (audio greatly compromised) 1080p or 4K streams used by Netflix (and I assume iTunes) the sizes are better. Something like 4.7 GB an hour, so lets just call it 10 GB for a full 2 hour movie. 4K can be 18.8 GB/hour, 37.6 GB for a 2 hour movie, although h.265 may cut than down to 9 GB an hour, so let's call it 20 GB. So you're talking no more than 6 1080p or 3 4K compressed movies.



And if your internet speed is so slow, how long is it going to take you to download such large files? 60 GB at 2 Mbps is going to take something like 71 hours. And do you have a data cap? I backup my media server to the cloud so I burn between 2-3 TB of data a month.
^That sounds about right, I was going to suggest 18-30 GB compressed per movie.

I started to write something yesterday, lost it...the storage space required is surely a large consideration, download one 4K movie and your 32 GB ATV 4K has 12 GB or less to work with for apps, streaming and everything else.

When you're on a computer with a xTB drive, 20 GB doesn't seem like a big deal, but, it really adds up quickly, so, will we one day be able to download 4K to iTunes on a computer? Probably not.

The other consideration...by making the movie only available via streaming puts a bit of a limitation on it that the studios may have wanted as well, (to help prevent piracy).
I get about 15mbps. I would download the movie when im not home or when sleeping. I download ps4 updates and games no problem doing this.
I understand the concept, it's frustrating, I've lived in places with limited ISPs, max was 10Mbps DSL for a long time.

Apple recommends 25Mbps, but, I think it might actually work at a minimum of 15 (minus HDR, I think you need about 18+ for HDR), if you actually get 15 Mbps, you might be able to do it, if you do nothing else on the internet while watching the 4K content. (I think Netflix 4K content runs at about 15 Mbps from what I've read). You could try it, just keep your receipt and be sure you know the return policy from wherever you get it.

One thing to keep in mind, you probably won't be streaming all 4K content, there are limited titles at this point, much of what you'll watch is going to be 1080p anyway.
 

Nermal

Moderator
Staff member
Dec 7, 2002
20,788
4,286
New Zealand
An uncompressed 4K movie runs about 100 GB.
Not even close. If I've done the calculations correctly then uncompressed 10-bit 4k is almost 48 GB per minute. Using something like ProRes you can get a full movie down to a few hundred GB, but it's definitely still compressed.

Not that it's really relevant for this thread, but just clearing up the misconception that UHD Blu-ray is uncompressed :)
 

2010mini

macrumors 601
Jun 19, 2013
4,698
4,806
i would love to get an AT4k but my internet speed is a joke. What in the world would be the reason we couldn’t download movies to the AT? We can do it on every other device. Am I missing something?

I’d love to be able to download a 4K movie overnight and watch it at my leisure on my 4K tv.

Steve Jobs moved the ATV away from having a local HD to download content. The ATV is a streaming device only. Not everyone has the minimum requirements to use streaming devices. And that is ok. No one can satisfy every single needs of consumers. The ATV might just not be for you until you get better service where you live.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,934
3,058
Not even close. If I've done the calculations correctly then uncompressed 10-bit 4k is almost 48 GB per minute. Using something like ProRes you can get a full movie down to a few hundred GB, but it's definitely still compressed.

Not that it's really relevant for this thread, but just clearing up the misconception that UHD Blu-ray is uncompressed

Yes, poorly worded. I should have differentiated between uncompressed PoRes (about 318 GB per hour), versus UHD disk (compressed, 50, 66,or 100 GB per disk), vs streaming (even more compressed). 1 hour of heavily compressed UHD Netflix at their recommended 25 Mbps is just 11 GB.

https://venturebeat.com/2013/03/01/...-100gb-downloads-remind-us-why-4k-is-a-waste/
 

Applenoob34

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Feb 18, 2014
345
122
Steve Jobs moved the ATV away from having a local HD to download content. The ATV is a streaming device only. Not everyone has the minimum requirements to use streaming devices. And that is ok. No one can satisfy every single needs of consumers. The ATV might just not be for you until you get better service where you live.
I can watch my Apple TV 3 just fine. I just wanted to be able to download 4K movies. I didn’t realize the size though. It sounds like I’d only be able to download one at a time with a 64g AT anyway. Oh well.
 

BODYBUILDERPAUL

Suspended
Feb 9, 2009
1,773
1,438
Barcelona
I can watch my Apple TV 3 just fine. I just wanted to be able to download 4K movies. I didn’t realize the size though. It sounds like I’d only be able to download one at a time with a 64g AT anyway. Oh well.

On a plus point, all of your iTunes films purchases will be future proof in a way - upgraded to 4K for some film in time and maybe 8K in 3 years time judging by the way the industry is moving speed wise. AND don't forget, you may get fast broadband/fibre in your area or who knows, you may move house and have fibre.
I'm lucky in that the city that I live at the moment is fibre everywhere 350mbps as an option and 50 as a basic one. In York next to me, Talk Talk have just launched their unlimited 1000mbps fibre at only £21 a month!!!!!!! INCREDIBLE!
Also the ATV 4K has a lovely quality HD to 4K upscaled in it, so it's a great lil box. Worth it just for the auto frame rate and apps of your choice compared to the ATV3 :)
Good luck and have lots of fun!
 
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