Windows 10 is getting some good reviews

Discussion in 'Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices' started by mclld, Jul 28, 2015.

  1. mclld macrumors 68000

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    #1
    I just copied and pasted these excerpts from another site

    If you’re upgrading to Windows 10 on a desktop or laptop PC, then prepare to be delightfully surprised: the Start menu you know and love is back. It feels slightly odd to celebrate its return, as it should never have gone away. It’s probably the biggest change, aside from the dark theme, that you’ll notice after Windows 8. But Microsoft hasn’t simply just reinstated the old version from Windows 7. Instead, it’s completely redesigned it in a way that combines the best aspects of the last two versions of Windows.

    ...

    It seems like every version of Windows brings a different theme, and Windows 10 is no different. It’s more restrained than Windows 8 or Vista were — but not as boring as Windows 7. A black theme sets the stage for Windows 10, but if you’re not a fan of the darkness, then there are options to pick an accent color that can be shown on the Start menu, task bar, and the new Action Center. Across all three, you’ll notice subtle transparency effects have returned to Windows 10 from their roots in Windows Vista and Windows 7. Microsoft hasn’t added any transparency to built-in apps like File Explorer, so the effect isn’t overplayed or irritating. It feels utilitarian, but in a modern way.

    Navigating around Windows 10 is also greatly improved. The annoying hot corners in Windows 8 that made you pull your hair out just trying to access settings or even the Start screen have been removed — thank god. A new Action Center works as a notification center to collect alerts from apps and provide quick access to settings.

    Alongside the snapping improvements is a new feature called Task View, which is a lot like Mission Control on the Mac. It displays all your open windows on a single screen so you can find what you’re looking for quickly. Microsoft has added a dedicated button to the task bar to try and get Windows 10 users to activate Task View and start using it. Microsoft claims the vast majority of its users have never used Alt+Tab to switch apps (one of those "weird but true" things about computers), so the idea is to help those users get better at multitasking.

    That little button is also the gateway to a great new feature: virtual desktops. Yes, Microsoft has finally added this to Windows after years of having to use third-party alternatives. It’s a true power user option, allowing you to create separate virtual desktops with different apps. I consider myself a Windows power user, but I only find myself using virtual desktops on my laptop rather than my desktop PC. There’s no quick way to switch between virtual desktops using a trackpad or mouse, but Windows key + Ctrl + left / right is a handy shortcut. I find the quickest way to access Task View (and virtual desktops) is simply by swiping up with three fingers on a trackpad.

    Microsoft has also built a virtual assistant like Siri right into Windows 10. It’s called Cortana, and it’s designed to look and feel like an extension of the Start menu, and just like the Windows Phone equivalent, you can also use your voice to search.
    There’s also an option to enable a "hey Cortana" feature that lets you simply holler questions at your laptop. It’s useful for simple things like the weather, but I found myself mostly using it to demonstrate Cortana to friends and family.

    Windows 10 also includes a new browser, called Edge. It may be new, but it sadly sticks to the past in a number of ways. Edge’s task bar icon is barely different from that of Internet Explorer, in an effort to keep it familiar to the millions of diverse Windows users. It’s simplified, clean, and performs well in most cases — but it’s lacking features you might expect of a modern browser. Snapping tabs into new windows is messy and clunky, and downloads start automatically with no choice of where they’re being stored. This is basic stuff, and it’s surprising it’s missing. Microsoft really started from scratch with Edge, and it shows.

    With most browsers, the one key thing I care about is performance, and Edge mostly delivers. Rendering most popular websites is smooth, and load times are usually good. It still feels like there’s some work to be done on occasions, and I’ve run into situations where pages just don’t render well at all or sites ask me to use Internet Explorer. Yes, Internet Explorer still exists in Windows 10, and you can access it through an "Open with Internet Explorer" option in Edge.

    While we’re discussing apps, it would be remiss not to mention Microsoft’s new Windows Store. Apps, games, music, movies, and TV have all finally been combined into a single place. The goal, eventually, is that developers will write a single app and it will run on your Windows PC, tablet, phone, Xbox One, and the upcoming HoloLens headset. That’s all good news, but the bad news is that there’s still a lack of true quality apps. Microsoft’s built-in apps show what’s possible, and I hope that Windows 10 will finally encourage developers to create better ones. Microsoft is offering Windows 10 free to Windows 7 and Windows 8 users with a view to create a huge install base to attract developers. It’s a wise move, but it might be years until we see the results.

    From WSJ:

    Windows 10 zips right along, and in a few ways speeds up multitasking. It’s easier now to organize a bunch of different windows and jump between them by tapping a new Task View button, located next to search.

    Windows 10 also manages to do this without scaling back functions on older machines. Upgrading an eight-year-old laptop running Windows 7 (HP EliteBook 6930p) took an hour and produced a computer that felt nimble and more capable. The only hitch: The laptop’s fingerprint reader no longer worked.

    The most impressive new protection, called Windows Hello, is straight out of “Mission: Impossible.” It replaces passwords with your face, your eyeball or your fingerprint. You’ll need special hardware to make it work, but it means one less hassle when you log in to your computer—and, in the future, it’ll work on applications and websites, too.


    From Wired:

    Before we go any further, let’s get this out of the way: You should upgrade to Windows 10. If you’re using Windows 8, 7, XP, ME, or 3.1, you should upgrade. Maybe wait a couple of weeks for the biggest bugs to be squashed, but do it. Why wouldn’t you? It’s free, it’s easy, and it’s a huge improvement on whatever version you’re using.

    The subtle, remarkable feat of Windows 10 is that it manages to introduce equally powerful new ideas without being so overbearing. If you upgrade your laptop from Windows 7 and steadfastly refuse to use any of the new features, the new OS will feel mostly like an aesthetic makeover. The design is cleaner and flatter, with heavier contrast between icons and backgrounds and a slightly darker overall look. It’s more consistent, too, as if Microsoft’s designers finally made it deep into the menus. But it’s the same Windows you’ve always known. Start Menu and everything.

    Windows 10 is shockingly useful right out of the box.

    In fact, I’m using a lot more pre-installed apps than I expected. Mail is terrific, simple and usable far beyond my expectations for any built-in email app. The redesigned Office apps, like Word and Excel, are simpler and touch-friendlier than ever. Even the Xbox app, which will let you stream games from your Xbox One and play them with a USB-connected controller, works basically perfectly. Windows 10 is shockingly useful right out of the box.

    From Neowin:

    Windows 10 is unique and while it may look like the desktop you grew up with, it is far more flexible than anything Microsoft has ever built; it's an OS that runs on everything, from your desktop to a phone and even the Xbox One. When Microsoft says that they are now using one OS on all of their devices, they mean it. The core of the OS is now a nimble gazelle that can be applied to any type of modern computing device and the benefits of this are profound for not only the consumer, but Microsoft as well.

    What Microsoft has done with this OS is removed all the things consumers disliked about Windows 8, repackaged the good features with new mechanics, added a significant number of new features, revamped the UI, sprinkled on a bit of Windows 7 and then piloted this OS with consumers through the Insider program that has surpassed five million users. The result of this work is Windows 10, a brand new OS that feels like yesterday but operates like tomorrow.

    When you first boot up the OS, Cortana will ask you to give her permission to interact with your content, to learn your favorite foods and even tell her what you want to be called. Cortana is an entirely opt-in feature and it's one I highly recommend you turn on. While you will be allowing her to learn about you and read some of your email, it's all private, it's not used for marketing purposes and it's strictly for contextual querying.

    In use, Cortana works very well. She melts into the background of Windows 10 and becomes a tool that you use when needed and fortunately, it never feels forced. While it may take you some time to get used to talking to your computer or having her help you keep your day organized, once you throw yourself into it and become comfortable with the feature, it becomes a vital component of daily flow.

    Originally Posted by Anton Sugar

    Engadget: 91/100

    I had high hopes for Windows 10 after Microsoft's Build conference, where I noted that, for once, the company was acting as a leader, not a follower. Windows 10 delivers the most refined desktop experience ever from Microsoft, and yet it's so much more than that. It's also a decent tablet OS, and it's ready for a world filled with hybrid devices. And, barring another baffling screwup, it looks like a significant step forward for mobile. Heck, it makes the Xbox One a more useful machine.

    It's nice, for once, to be able to recommend a new version of Windows without any hesitation. If you've got a Windows 7 or 8 machine, there's no reason not to take advantage of Microsoft's free upgrade offer. And if, for some reason, you have a machine that's older than Windows 7, Windows 10 is good enough to justify getting a new computer.

    TechRadar:

    OUR VERDICT
    Feature-wise, Windows 10 is the new Windows 7. It's robust, pleasant to use and free...

    FOR
    Start menu is functionally excellent
    Action Center features are handy
    Settings app is finally a Control Panel replacement
    Universal apps are much higher in quality

    AGAINST
    Will developers embrace Universal apps?
    Windows 8.1 users will miss some features
    Expensive if you can't upgrade for free



    Originally Posted by LOLDSFAN

    TechSpot: 85/100

    Pros: The best Windows experience so far. Windows 10 fixes faults from 8 and finds clever ways to be functional across different devices and form factors. It's fast, stable, good-looking and free for most users.

    Cons: The Windows Store and Universal Apps still have to prove themselves. Windows 10 will only achieve greatness if Microsoft keeps updating it as promised. UI inconsistency is still something to consider.
     
  2. sracer macrumors 603

    sracer

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  3. 556fmjoe macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Is it mom ready? My non-technical mother uses Windows 7 on a desktop and I may upgrade it to 10 for her, but need to know for sure if it's going to be frustrating for her or not. She's a teacher and uses it for Office, browsing, Youtube, and email. It basically just needs to be easy to find common applications and files; she won't be digging into settings or anything like that.

    I skipped Windows 8 for obvious reasons.
     
  4. M5RahuL macrumors 68020

    M5RahuL

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    #4
    Been running Windows 10 since Preview 1,and it has been very impressive!

    I would definitely recommend updating from Windows 8.1 (which I happen to like too ) and also from Windows 7

    Windows 10 is a great amalgamation of Win 8 and Win 7, with improved stability and features.
     
  5. macrem macrumors 65816

    macrem

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    #5
    Windows gets some (strikingly similar) features OS X and Linux variants have had for many years. Too bad underneath it's not Unix. Once you see the beauty of Unix, you realize what a mess Windows is at its core & the 10 release looks like piling more makeup on a pig. It would be nice to have either *nix underneath or something new built from the ground up that takes OSes to the next level.
     
  6. dec. Suspended

    dec.

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    #6
    While it's only going to serve as game laucher on my gaming PC, it does sound really good in reviews throughout the usual sites, looking forward to a nice upgrade.
     
  7. spriter macrumors 65816

    spriter

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    #7
    Been running the Insider preview since January and am really liking both the progress made as well as the current RTM state.

    It's very fast, smooth, and looks great at 2560 on my '14 rMBP. I hope Apple takes note and polishes El Capitan to the same level (Yosemite is/was a slouch for me).
     
  8. Suckfest 9001 macrumors 6502a

    Suckfest 9001

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    #8
    Something something El Cap split screen

    I'm very sorry but OS X in its current form is a joke for power users. That Unix underbody doesn't save it from being a toy OS.
     
  9. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

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    #9
    The mission control features are strikingly familiar.
     
  10. MRU, Jul 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2015

    MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

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    #10
    Define power user ?

    I work with OSX no problem as a graphic designer whether it be a very large painting / illustration with literally hundreds of layers or a 4k video with lots of compositing / effects. Likewise editing photos from our hasselblad 50mp studio camera in raw format.

    Likewise the macs in our Recording studio working all day long on Protools etc...

    If these are not power user jobs what are?

    A poor artist blames his tools.
     
  11. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #11
    I told my daughter that once Windows 10 was out that I'd get her setup with a German speaking laptop I guess that time has arrived.
     
  12. diamond.g macrumors 603

    diamond.g

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    #12
    I don't understand what you mean (wrt the bolded part), could you elaborate?
     
  13. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #13
    I'm upgrading now, and I've had the beta for a while. I'd say I like where windows 10 is going.
     
  14. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #14
    I do a considerable amount of data analysis and visualisation in OS X. It works well, and indeed virtual machines allow me to run Windows and Linux. If there is a more powerful OS out there, then perhaps you would name it?

    In any case, Windows 10 sounds like it will be a good upgrade. Perhaps this will prod Apple into some badly needed revision of OS X (for instance, my pet peeve: that the Finder does not automatically adjust column width so that all file names can be seen in their entirety).
     
  15. mclld thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #15
    Will it be possible after upgrading my 8.1 system to make a bootable usb drive with 10 to do fresh installs?
     
  16. bobenhaus macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    Thats because Apple gutted the internals and hid all the directories
     
  17. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #17
    Perhaps but if the tool gets in the way, then why use it. While I like OS X and it does most of what I want it too, I don't like the direction its going in.
     
  18. Suckfest 9001 macrumors 6502a

    Suckfest 9001

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    #18
    Exactly, all you brought up was graphics stuff which is exclusively the only thing Mac does better. Windows has way more applications, tools, and support for practically everything else, from statistics to computer science to industrial/enterprise tools. Why do you think Windows is so much more popular in the enterprise world? Graphics isn't the only thing that professionals do. :)

    Right so your argument is that it's powerful because you can run Windows on it through VM? Uhhh.
     
  19. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #19
    Yes, among other things. In fact I'd say the Mac/OS X/Windows VM setup is one of the best ways of experiencing Windows. The whole Windows HD becomes one file that can be easily backed up, there is no speed penalty, and, for the few instances in which a Windows program has not been ported to OS X, the virtual machine suffices. I run a fairly heavy duty data acquisition and analysis system using a Windows Virtual machine on my Mac in OS X. Being able to use UNIX tools is also useful in OS X, but I have yet to see a good solution for doing that in Windows (perhaps there is one).

    Keep in mind that any modern PC is a Turing machine and therefore infinitely flexible, no matter the OS on which it runs. Thus, judging the utility of the OS depends on the given user's priorities. I prefer the flexibility of being able to use 3 separate OS's on one computer, if need be simultaneously. In any case, calling OS X a 'toy' operating system is a bit silly.
     
  20. zOne31 macrumors regular

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    May 21, 2012
    #20
    Wow, Windows 10 looks good. Only reason I have this current Macbook Air was because I wanted to avoid Windows 8 when I got it almost 3 years ago. It may be time to start heavily considering going back to Windows and getting a Surface Pro in the next couple years. Love the fact you don't have to take out a Surface at the airport. Here's hoping Windows Phone also takes off. I am excited to see how the mobile and desktop OS plays out in the next few years. May be time to switch OSes again.
     
  21. mclld thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #21
    Windows phone will not take off, they blew it
     
  22. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #22
    Even Microsoft has accepted that their phone business will not catch up (never mind unseat android and iPhone). They'll continue to roll out phones and provide targeted solutions, i.e., vertical solutions but the writing on the wall, its not going to be a money maker for MS.
     
  23. akuma13 macrumors 6502a

    akuma13

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    #23
    I've been running Windows 10 for a couple hours and i'm really impressed! It's great on my desktop and even better on my surface pro 3. I have run into some issues with the Edge browser not responding but that's it at the moment.
     
  24. Surface3User, Jul 29, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2015

    Surface3User macrumors newbie

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    #24
    I am using Windows 10 on a Surface 3, and it's pretty awesome. Much better than expected as I didn't really have any expectations. I actually liked Windows 8.1 especially on a tablet, but I can see why people had issues. And now that I am using Windows 10, the bad parts of Windows 8.1 become more accentuated.

    OS X is not a "toy" operating system. It's just really overrated. I switched from OS X to Windows 7 and 8.1, and I just feel like Apple doesn't really give 10 cents about the Mac side of things.
     
  25. perkedel macrumors 6502a

    perkedel

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    California
    #25
    I'm installing Windows 10 Enterprise on my HyperV 2012 R2 server right now, we'll see if I can get my RSAT tools to work.
     

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