Windows 7 11gb, normal?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by orfeas0, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. orfeas0 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    #1
    So I have a 20gb partition for windows 7, and it only has 2gb left.
    So I scanned the boot camp partition with DiskInventoryX (within mac Lion), and I found out the windows folder is 11gb!!
    1st) Is that normal?
    2nd) There are many amd64 files in there, what are those for? I mean MacBooks have intel processors, not amd. Or does that amd mean something else?
     
  2. Sincci macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Location:
    Finland
    #2
    It's normal. Windows does backups (system restore points) every time you use Windows update so that you can revert back to the old version if the update doesn't work for some reason. Those backups are stored inside Windows folder. You can disable these if you want by using this guide: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/3187/disable-system-restore-in-windows-7/. You can also run the Disk Cleanup Tool to delete Service pack backups (http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/44317/should-you-delete-windows-7-service-pack-backup-files-to-save-space/).

    The AMD64 files mean that you are using 64-bit version of Windows. The technology was originally created by AMD and was then cross-licensed to Intel later on which Intel now likes to call as x64 (not to be confused with IA64 which is a completely different system). Anyway, AMD64 is just a naming convention Microsoft decided to use to indicate that the files are for 64-bit systems and not for 32-bit systems (there are few different names for those too, like x86, i386 and i586). So, do NOT delete those AMD64 files under any circumstances :)

    I would also like to point out that only having 20gb for Windows 7 is pretty much asking for trouble since it can run out of diskspace quite quickly due to the updates, pagefile (which is normally 2x amount of RAM you have) and programs that you are using on the same partition.
     

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