Windows 7 guy goes to OSX and is now LOST

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Miltz, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. Miltz macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    I decided I wanted to get a rMBP as my main system for lots of reasons, one being I hate windows 8/10. (although, I love windows 7). Anyway, when I stick my memory card from my camera in the camera iPhoto pops up, gives me the options to import, so I do that. But then the images are stuck in iPhoto and I can't even find the files on the HD. All I want to do is load the images on the computer in a folder like on Windows 7. On Windows 7 I stick my memory card in, I hit import, windows automatically imports the images into a folder that has the date, and then I can select which images I want to edit with photoshop. That's all I want. That's it. Thanks guys, I'm sure it's easy, but I'm a OSX virgin. (And no I don't want to use lightroom)
     
  2. zObsidian macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    #2
    If you're importing photos into iPhoto, then they are stored in the iPhoto library in your Pictures folder. If you just want to view the original files inside of your iPhoto library, you can do the following:

    Open a Finder window > Places/user name/Pictures/iPhoto Library, ctrl-click and select "Show Package Contents", go to files in Originals.

    Otherwise, if you didn't want to use iPhoto at all, you can just use Finder to drag and drop photos from your memory card into any folder on your computer as you would with any other OS.
     
  3. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    Thank you very much for the tip... I was hoping OS X was a smart as Windows 7 image importer... Pop it in, hit import and walk away. I'm a bit surprised.
     
  4. chirpie macrumors 6502a

    chirpie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    #4
    Another far easier way, is with iPhoto open, just highlight any photo, then click:

    file > reveal in finder.

    I use iPhoto to categorize all my photos, (Sorting by date is nice, but then adding geo tagging and face recognition is even better. ^_^) and then if I want to touch them up in photoshop, that gets me straight to the photo on my computer.
     
  5. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #5
    Welcome to the Matrix. :D

    I find this fascinating (so I apologize in advanced for the philosophical musings that follow)... :eek:

    Windows requires a totally different mindset from OS X. Windows is very much a file-system centric operating system. Interacting with the file system is part of using it and it's almost impossible to do anything without interacting with the Windows File System.

    OS X is very much the opposite. It's an app/task oriented operating system and the file system is there as a vehicle for apps to store stuff. Old school power users might disagree with me, but I believe that if you have to interact with the file system in OS X, there's something wrong with your workflow/methodology.

    The only folder system constructs I use are my Downloads Folder (for obvious reasons) and my Desktop (a temporary storage place). And while I know where my music and photos are, I never interact with the file system for that kind of content. Never.

    So, I'm curious... why would you want to access your files via the file system? Every use case I can think of from viewing, to sorting, to culling, to editing, to sharing would be better done within iPhotos rather than the file system. Even backup (pick a drive and let Time Machine do it's thing). If you have the right tools to do everything you want with your photos (e.g. iPhoto) who cares where your photos are actually stored? :)
     
  6. ApfelKuchen, Apr 22, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015

    ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    Aug 28, 2012
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    #6
    There are several apps that can import photos when you plug in the card. If I recall correctly, Windows exhibits similar default behavior with its bundled photo app.

    In iPhoto > Preferences > General you'll find an option for "Connecting camera opens:" You can select "No application," and you have several other options.

    You may want to take a look at the Image Capture app instead of iPhoto (Apple provides more than one way to skin the cat). It'll display a decent-sized thumbnail of each image and the image metadata. It'll import to wherever you wish if you select Import to: Other....

    And I'll second VirtualRain's comments. iPhoto (and Photos, when you update to OS X 10.10.3) are built for managing (and editing) photos. The file system is built for managing files. Those programs provide all sorts of tools for locating photos, it allows you to organize images in multiple ways. If you want to find all photos of your kid's birthday parties, you can make an album containing those images. You can put some of those same images in another album, "favorite family photos," and into yet more albums organized by date... And you won't be making copies of those images - they're all just linked back to the same master image. If you choose to use iPhoto's editing features, any changes you make will be reflected in every album in which the photo appears. If you want to make multiple edits of the same image, you can create additional versions of the image - and you're still not cloning the master image and cluttering your disk - all editing is non-destructive (does not modify the original).

    When I import images I put them into topic-oriented albums. I have other albums dedicated to select images from one or more albums (say, an album for Ketchikan 6/15/2014, one for Juneau 6/16/2014, another for Sitka 6/17/2014, and one "Alaska 2014 Selects." A few of those will find their way into my "Killer P's" album. Meantime, buried deep within the iPhoto library package (a package is a folder that is made to appear as if it's a single file), the master images are neatly tucked away in folders by year, month, day, and import event (multiple memory cards shot on the same day). I know where those photos are, and the app's going to do a better job of storing them in a consistent manner than this fallible human ever could.
     
  7. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    The matrix is right... It's like asking someone why they like milk and sugar in their coffee, because they like it. I must be from the old school I guess... But I like to have access to my files and know where they are. I often just back up my images on external drives, why do I have to use time machine? I dunno... I like total control. Windows 7 64bit gave me that. I just wanted to finally take my entire workflow to the mac especially since I didn't like Windows 8/10 at all. I'm going to give this a shot, but I don't like it so far. I was just hoping to hear that I don't know OS X well, rather than having total control of your files and accessing the file system is only a windows quality.

    Any photographers who use their system on a PRO level, feel free to tell me what you do. Thanks you everyone for their support.
     
  8. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #8
    Just set it to open the Image Capture app instead of iPhoto - Problem solved.
     
  9. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Thank you... I'll try these. What do you do about the sharp edges on the macbook? It's killing my wrists and lower thumb area. I would have never imaged this to be a problem.
     
  10. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #10
    I was being a bit philosophical in my last post. The fact is that you can do everything you could do in the Windows File System with OS X's File System... It's just that you CAN do things differently in Apps with OS X and ignore the file system if you want.

    Anyway, don't worry, iPhotos stores your photos in a folder... And as others have pointed out, you can browse that if you really want.

    But try not to bother... You might find it liberating... Use iPhoto to manage your photos, iTunes to manage your music, and Time Machine to manage your backups and spend less time monkeying around with the guts of your OS moving files around, and use it for something productive instead. ;)
     
  11. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    That really sounds good.. but I don't feel I was wasting time monkeying around. I just found Win 7 easy and straight forward, that's all... Your comments reminded me of the famous commercial from 1984... except in reverse...lol
     
  12. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #12

    You can take the red or the blue pill ;)
     
  13. Hughmac macrumors demi-god

    Hughmac

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    Kent, UK
    #13
    I 2nd this - it's a lot easier - I set Image Capture to download to my desktop, then open all the photos in Preview to whittle them down to keepers.
    Only after that will I look at post processing options and move the photos to appropriate folders.

    Cheers :)

    Hugh
     
  14. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    Aug 28, 2012
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    #14
    I can't help on that one, I haven't used a laptop since iPad came along.

    We each carry our own baggage. I started in the days of MS-DOS, so I know what it is to manage a file system. But filing physical documents into their proper drawers and Penda-Flex folders has never been one of my favorite office tasks. Therefore, computing's filing cabinet metaphor doesn't do a thing for me. Finder is an incredibly useful and important tool; I visit it frequently. I just don't want to live there (and I don't need to).

    I've seen countless people post, "I want to/like to know where my photos are." I do know where mine are, if and when I need to access them. If you want a metaphor, iPhoto/Photos becomes your file clerk or photographer's assistant. It follows strict, consistent rules as to how and where the images are stored, and you can check your assistant's work anytime you want. Right-click/Command-click on the iPhoto/Photos library icon in Finder and select 'Show Package Contents' from the context menu. Inside you'll find, among other things, a Masters folder, and inside that, nested folders organized by date that contain the master images. Once you're satisfied that your assistant is doing his/her job, how often do you really need to check his/her work? That's why a competent assistant is so valuable.

    As I noted just the other day, in another thread, backing up "only what's important" is a great way to lose a lot of "little" things that can cost a lot of time and trouble to reconstruct (including all the options and preferences you've set for your system and apps). Time Machine is a great tool. You buy a backup drive (they're cheap), connect it for the first time, and OS X asks if you want to use it for Time Machine. Say yes, and in a few more clicks you're set. From then on, it's constantly backing up on a regular schedule, and as the name implies (well, more than implies), you can go back in time to recover from things like accidental deletions (or simply previous versions) as well as recover from larger disasters.
     
  15. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

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    Jun 5, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    #15
    Not sure exactly what may be causing discomfort but have a look at something like this: Laptop wrist rests

    ~ Peter
     
  16. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

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    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #16
    I'm with the OP, and I hope he's not feeling as though he's going to get criticized if he doesn't go all-in The Apple Way.

    I like to manage my own files; I don't like to have apps do it for me. It's a choice and I'd never argue with people who, for example, have iPhoto do it all.

    I don't use iPhoto any more, but when I did I also kept my images where I wanted them, and had iPhoto import them from another disk.

    I run Time Machine because it's convenient and useful. But I have more than 10 years of images (about 2.5 TB) that I want to keep in chronological order and also keep backed up. Can't do that with TM alone.

    I import from my camera (using Nikon Transfer 2) putting each day's work into a folder named according to the date (2015_04_23 for example) both on my system disk and on an external at the same time. Time Machine backs the relatively-current stuff up and I'm in charge of copying those folders weekly to one or more external disks, using Chronosync. Some things I copy over to Dropbox.

    For me, chronological organization is key. For someone else, it wouldn't be -- but who cares? Isn't that the point? OS X lets us perform the same task in a variety of ways. If it didn't, I don't think I'd be using it.
     
  17. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    Thanks for the support. I'm going to try some of the tips in this thread and see how I like it. If I don't I'll have to return it. I am finding the 13.3 inch screen a little small for a main workstation. Ironically my 27 inch screen is too big and hurts my eyes. I wish I could afford a 15" model. I think that may have been better for me. It's been 24hrs, so i'm still trying to figure things out. I will say this dual core feels as fast as my i7 2700K 16GB desktop. I guess the SSD and OS X goes a long way. And it's dead Silent. Even in photoshop and other imaging programs.

    ----------

    iphoto is taking up 1.9GB and has slash through it and says it doesn't work with 10.10 anyway. Why is it even in the system? Can I just delete it? Photos is the new version that replaced it, correct?
     
  18. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

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    #18
    You're right. I haven't looked at iPhoto for a few months. So, it's Photos for you, if you want to use anything from Apple.

    I still have an iPhoto library, so I guess I'll have to convert to Photos. I don't mind doing it, although I didn't realize I was going to be forced to.

    Anyway, keep at it for a while. I remember being frustrated when I switched from Windows (XP, that's how long ago it was) but the frustration passed quickly enough. The other posters are correct in saying that if you let Apple do things its way, it can be very smooth. I know plenty of people who operate their Macs like that, and they have no complaints. Unless you're operating with a 14 day return window, just keep trucking along.
     
  19. Small White Car macrumors G4

    Small White Car

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #19
    Basically 3 main choices now:

    1) Apple 'Photos' if you don't want to waste a ton of time managing photos.

    2) 'Image Capture' and Finder if you love wasting time managing photos.

    3) Adobe Lightroom if you're really into this stuff and need a ton of control.


    I use Lightroom for my business but am honestly considering 'Photos' for my family photos. I haven't decided yet but the point is there's nothing saying you have to just pick one option.
     
  20. Miltz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    New York
    #20
    since my computer was new and I never used iPhoto before, I deleted it. why apple included a 1.9GB file of a program that isn't compatible with 10.10 is beyond me. Now I have more space on my SSD.

    I have another question, why is it showing that I have 1.3GB in photos, 1.18GB in audio, and 409MB in movies when I never put anything on this computer, it's brand new... I need as the SSD space I can get out of it.
     
  21. mofunk macrumors 68000

    mofunk

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    Aug 26, 2009
    Location:
    Americas
    #21
    There isn't a huge difference between Mac and PC. You still have to tell your computer what to do. On the Mac its automatically set for iPhoto to open. You can change these setting by opening Image Capture. In the corner left click on the drop down button to choose which App to open.


    When I bought my first Mac I would read up on the How To's on Macworld's page/magazine just so that I can get around the landscape. You can check out videos on youtube and check around Macworld too. There are some videos on Mac's site. Plus if you have a question you can click on the Help link in each Application that you are using. :apple:
     
  22. Hughmac macrumors demi-god

    Hughmac

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    Kent, UK
    #22
    Disk Inventory X http://www.derlien.com/ will show you where the files are hiding and allow you to remove them.

    Cheers :)

    Hugh
     
  23. BlunderToo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2014
    Location:
    Trondheim, Norway
    #23
    Workflow

    I am not a PRO photographer but rather an enthusiast who take a LOT of photos.

    My workflow is as follows:

    1 - Take photos (obviously)
    2 - Insert memorycard in card reader
    3 - Import all photos to Lightroom (I get to choose destination)
    4 - Browse all photos to rate the ones I'll keep and delete the no-good ones
    5 - Edit as needed in Lightroom or Photoshop or both
    6 - Using Lightroom I can easily filter my collection using a wide array of options (keywords, tags, camera make, camera model, lens, date, and many moore) to only display the specific photo(s) I am looking for

    I've set Time Machine to backup my photos even if I keep them on an external drive.

    Hope this helps.
    John
     
  24. TheDrift- macrumors 6502a

    TheDrift-

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    Mar 8, 2010
    #24
    When I moved over to mac from windows the mindset was a bit confusing....I always likened windows to a library, you don't worry too much what the book is called, you pay attention to where you place it which self which section..if you want it you go to the area where it is and find it.

    With mac you worry less where its stored and need to remember what its named...then you just call for you file and hey presto it appears :)
     
  25. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #25
    OP wrote above:
    [[ The matrix is right... It's like asking someone why they like milk and sugar in their coffee, because they like it. I must be from the old school I guess... But I like to have access to my files and know where they are. ]]

    I'm with the OP, insofar as "file management" of photos (and music) on my drives is concerned.

    I -DO NOT WANT- iPhoto, iTunes, or any other application directing how my photos (or any other kind of file) are going to be sorted and stored on my drives.

    I want to store them (on disk) using a folder hierarchy and location of my own choosing.

    For this reason, I have disabled iPhoto/Aperture/Photos from automatically importing pic files when a camera card is attached and mounted on my Mac.

    All I want is for the card icon to appear on the desktop.
    I'll then "go into" it, and use the finder to copy/move those pictures I wish to where I want them to be.

    I've set up iPhoto/Aperture/Photos to use "referenced" libraries, leaving the originals where I want them on disk.

    This works for me.
    I realize others will wish to use different routines.
     

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