Windows Optimized PDF Appears Corrupted In Preview

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by McGizzle, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. McGizzle macrumors newbie

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    #1
    My PDF displays properly in Windows and Mac, but after optimizing it with Acrobat 8 Pro on Windows, it looks corrupted in Mac Preview. Funny thing is, this same PDF loads correctly in Acrobat on Mac. Each line of text jumbles on top of each other based on justification. Anyone have any ideas why this is happening?
     
  2. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #2
    there are sometimes incompatibilities between pdf generated by different library. I guess we will have to settle on adobe as standard.
     
  3. McGizzle thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Wow, that was a quick reply! Thanks for that. Have you had this issue before? What if was to optimize the PDF on Mac's Acrobat Pro, would it still look corrupted?
     
  4. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #4
    What is so important about optimizing the PDF?
     
  5. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #5
    you can sure try out.

    I have OSX pdf printer on my MB, I have foxit and cutepdf printer on my Netbook. I do see the problems with generated pdf doesn't play well on Mac, adobe reader always display the document ok, but preview sometimes doesn't.

    My impression is it would be smaller in size. AFAIK
     
  6. McGizzle thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #6
    The PDF document needs to be below 140KB's. When it's optimized it gets down to 108KBs. Any suggestions on how to reduce it without optimization?
     
  7. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #7
    I find that the best choice for producing PDF files is Adobe Acrobat Pro, specifically the Acrobat Distiller utility. It produces PDF files of high quality, small file size, and cross-platform compatibility.
     
  8. cmcbridejr macrumors 6502a

    cmcbridejr

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    #8
    Part of a PDF is a subset of the PostScript page description programming language for generating the layout and graphics.

    The PDF was originally developed by Adobe, but later released as open source to allow anyone to create a PDF reader/writer without having to pay royalties to Adobe. However, royalties do need to be payed to Adobe for true PostScript.

    There are certainly PostScript emulators, but there is no true PostScript without paying royalties to Adobe. I think that Apple's PDF viewer (Preview) is based on PostScript emulation as they prefer not to have to pay royalties to Adobe for true PostScript. That may be the root of your issue.

    I don't think that Apple and Adobe have a strong partnership anymore. Apple continues to blame Adobe for Flash being too intensive on system resources for the iPhone, when in reality, they want to use an open source standard that gets around paying royalties to Adobe for playing Flash (by pushing the capabilities of QuickTime and Java). On the other hand, Apple is not doing Adobe any favors by not paying them royalties for their technologies, and therefore, Adobe does not care about releasing Mac versions of their products with the same feature set and on the same time schedule as the Windows versions.

    Please correct me if I am wrong.
     
  9. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #9
    i dont think so, PDF now is Open standard, its highly unlikely that adobe can charge anything for the format, and there is no difference between "true" or "emulate" PDF.
     
  10. cmcbridejr macrumors 6502a

    cmcbridejr

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    #10
    That is exactly what I said. PDF is open standard. However, one of the key components of a PDF is a PostScript interpreter. Royalties must be paid to Adobe to have true PostScript interpretation.
     
  11. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #11
    can you refer me to a link or document about this?
     
  12. cmcbridejr macrumors 6502a

    cmcbridejr

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    #12
    All you have to do is use Google, my friend. Here is some info from Wikipedia:


    "Formerly a proprietary format, PDF was officially released as an open standard on July 1, 2008"

    "Anyone may create applications that can read and write PDF files without having to pay royalties to Adobe Systems; Adobe holds patents to PDF, but licenses them for royalty-free use in developing software complying with its PDF specification.

    The PDF combines three technologies:

    * A subset of the PostScript page description programming language, for generating the layout and graphics.
    * A font-embedding/replacement system to allow fonts to travel with the documents.
    * A structured storage system to bundle these elements and any associated content into a single file, with data compression where appropriate."

    "PostScript is a page description language run in an interpreter to generate an image, a process requiring many resources. PDF is a file format, not a programming language, i.e. flow control commands such as if and loop are removed, while graphics commands such as lineto remain.

    Often, the PostScript-like PDF code is generated from a source PostScript file. The graphics commands that are output by the PostScript code are collected and tokenized; any files, graphics, or fonts to which the document refers also are collected; then, everything is compressed to a single file. Therefore, the entire PostScript world (fonts, layout, measurements) remains intact."



    As I have said before, Adobe still holds rights to the PostScript PDL, and therefore, they must be payed royalties in order to gain access to having true PostScript in a PDF. Mind you, there are PostScript emulators/interpreters (like GhostScript) that do there best to interpret PS, but it is certainly not true Adobe PostScript.

    I work in the printing business and all of the professionals that I know of simply buy printers with true Adobe PostScript print boards (which are way more expensive compared to PS emulator and PCL boards), and they use Adobe Acrobat for the handling of PDFs so that true PostScript is interpreted in the PDF. In this line of business, it is imperative for "what you see is what you get".

    The OP is using Adobe Acrobat Pro on Windows to create a PDF with Adobe's true PostScript PDL (and also seems to be using a compression algorithm developed by Adobe), but Apple's Preview is not translating the Adobe created PDF properly since they do not use Adobe's true PS interpretation. However, Adobe Acrobat on the Mac reads the PDF with no problems.

    Apple's Preview is great for dealing with most PDFs, but professionals rely on true Adobe PS so that they do not run into issues like the OP.
     
  13. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #13
    I still need to dig more about the royolties, since frankly Im still unconvinced, maybe because I can't believe it :) you might be right, i just need to convince myself in some way, if it were to happen.

    but for OP 's problem. I m not sure the answer is what you think.

    I have this corrupted file before, its not misalignment, or bad shaped font, its that part of the document are just noise. I am not sure that is related to true or emulated postscript interpreter.
     
  14. cmcbridejr macrumors 6502a

    cmcbridejr

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    #14
    Then just go to Adobe's website:

    http://www.adobe.com/products/postscript/


    "Adobe PostScript 3 printing technology is licensed to original equipment manufacturers"


    They also go on to say:

    "Printing systems equipped with Adobe® PostScript® 3™ offer state-of-the-art capabilities to meet the demanding requirements of both professional publishing and office environments."

    Can you put the Registered symbol on there anymore Adobe? Is this enough proof for you to know that PS is licensed by Adobe.

    Look at any high end printer and you will see a big fat Adobe PS sticker on it.

    Also, check out this Wikipedia link:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/True_Type_Font

    Why do you think that Microsoft and Apple partnered together to create the open source TrueType? Because they were trying to avoid paying royalties to Adobe for PostScript. They felt that Adobe had a stranglehold on them with PS.
     

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