Windows Vista

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by johnnyi08, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. johnnyi08 macrumors newbie

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    Jan 5, 2008
  2. nzoMD macrumors member

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    Jan 21, 2008
    Location:
    San Diego
    #2
    prolly in the windows forum.. but I am trying to figure out if I should get XP SP2 or Vista for my mac. I know XP is the better/stable OS of the two, but games in the future will require Vista (some already do).
     
  3. modesty macrumors member

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    Feb 3, 2008
    #3
    shrug its pretty much the same as xp, just a little slower/prettier. i had some problems on it with my thinkpad, the laptop was a piece of **** though. it runs great in vmware, running visual studio 2008, etc. it works well with spaces + fullscreen. its sort of a shame going back to mac os because vista looks a lot sharper. the top bar in mac could definitely use a redesign. that and i hate how i never know how the red button is going to function in a program. spaces is definitely a must have OS feature though. they both have their pros and cons. mac is a little more dumbed down, but the software is integrated much better with the os. its alot easier to uninstall programs, since there is no registry. windows runs better programs, has more features
     
  4. bjett92 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    Indy, IN
    #4
    I have two questions from your post.

    How is a mac dumbed down? I find tasks are just simpler to perform on a mac.

    What features does windows have that os x doesn't? I can't think of anything that I ever used on windows that os x does not have. I find os x actually has more features (spaces, expose, time machine, dashboard)
     
  5. modesty macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    #5
    having to carry around a mouse so i can right click is annoying. you could argue ctrl + click is just as easy for you, but why not include a right mouse button on the pro. the only reason i can see is to make it simpler for new users, but imo it just makes things slower for advanced users. i would say another con is that mac reserves the several of the f keys for the operating system, with no way of disabling it. (please tell me if you know how i can use my f8 key) maybe that may not be a con for you.

    it may just be that im used to windows, but i rely on alot of software where these buttons are highly useful. however i love the fact i can disable cap locks without messing with the registry.

    i really also dislike the design of the red button / top taskbar. sometimes the red button minimizes, sometimes it closes a window but it remains open, sometimes it closes the program. i just never know. minimize can do the same thing as the x in some cases, but appears as a dupe in the dock. maximize does not always behave as i expect. i would say that red button feature is for new users. apple is not worried about programs staying open in the background, since most (newbie) users dont run programs that hog alot of memory (just run safari / word pretty much), but they seem more responsive when they click on the icon.

    you could argue however that windows is backwards with installations. files can do w/e tehy want, and are sometimes impossible to uninstall without extra tools.
     
  6. bjett92 macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    Indy, IN
    #6
    Apple will NEVER put two mouse buttons on a trackpad becuase it goes against the way they have done it since the beginning of the mouse. I also think one mouse button looks better and is easier to click because you don't have to click in any certain place. You can change all of the keyboard shortcuts by going to system prefs > keyboard and mouse > keyboard shortcuts. I've never seen an app where the minimize and close button acted the exact same. I know most mac users, myself included, prefer that most apps not close when the window is closed. for example with photoshop, i want to close the image i'm working on, but I don't want the app to close because when I open another image I don't want to have to wait for photoshop to re-load.
     
  7. HLdan macrumors 603

    HLdan

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    #7
    Well you are right that you are just used to using Windows and that's the caveat. Like you mentioned you do like the fact that you don't have to deal with the Registry being on the Mac OS however along with that you have to understand that the Mac OS is not Windows which is why there's no Registry but other things are not going to be like Windows either and overtime you will grow to like how it's done on the Mac OS.
    One example is the apps closing and quitting as you mentioned. Windows is a single-windowed OS and the Mac OS is a document based multi-windowed, multi-tasking OS.
    Because the Mac OS is multi-windowed, mutli-task certain programs will quit when the window is closed and certain ones won't. Believe me you will love it when you understand it.

    Here's the logic behind it:

    If an application has functionality when the window is closed it is not suppose to "quit" when you hit the close button. Example, iTunes runs without the window showing so you don't have to minimize it like in Windows.
    iPhoto has zero functionality without the photo window so when you hit the close button it quits.
    Same goes for System Preferences, you can't use it without the window so it quits when you hit the close button.
    Another poster mentioned Photoshop, you can close the window and still access functions of Photoshop such as opening new canvas's so it's no point in it quitting just because you closed the window.

    If you want apps to quit for the heck of it no matter what program you run jut use the keyboard shortcut "Command+Q" which stands for command quit. I use it so much I use on apps that quit with the close button.
    You may need to clean your cache or do maintenance because the close button never minimizes. Something is wrong there.
     
  8. modesty macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    #8
    yea i use command quit. well how come firefox doesnt behave the way you said. or that stupid preview thing. or hwo a bout transmit ftp. microsoft word, excell, dreamweaver, photoshop, or bash
     
  9. HLdan macrumors 603

    HLdan

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    #9
    I'll be more than happy to answer your question but I don't know what you mean? What are these programs not doing?
    Stupid Preview? Are you using Leopard? Preview has always been on OS X but it's really stepped up in Leopard. I no longer have any use for Adobe Reader as Preview does all the functions plus more. I would only consider Acrobat if I needed more digital signature functionality. Preview also edits photos very well. Best PDF reader ever and the tool bar has lots of features not found in Adobe.
     
  10. modesty macrumors member

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    Feb 3, 2008
    #10
    ok i can understand with photoshop, but what about small apps like some of the ones i mentioned above i could see maybe bash if you dont want to lose your last commands, but want to minimize. honestly i think it makes more sense to have a minimize and a close button, where the yellow button would just minimize the program to the dock. if it has multiple windows open, use stacks
     
  11. modesty macrumors member

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    Feb 3, 2008
    #11
    open a pdf. close the the window. preview stays running in memory
     
  12. TheStu macrumors 65816

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    Aug 20, 2006
    Location:
    Carlisle, PA
    #12
    By default, closing the window is not supposed to quit the application. That is developer choice. And don't expect Adobe to actually give two *****s about OS X anytime soon, just look at Flash (I know that PhotoShop is the standard, but that doesn't necessarily excuse it from being d!cks).

    As for your right clicking issue, all I have to say is...
    Two Finger Right Clicking!
     
  13. modesty macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    #13
    ok that is pretty sweet, just turned it on
     
  14. HLdan macrumors 603

    HLdan

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    #14
    When you open a PDF file in Preview and then close the PDF it shouldn't quit the app. Think of it this way, you have multiple PDF's you want to view, each time you double click to open them Preview opens, when you are done viewing that PDF close the window but Preview remains open so you can still use it for other PDF's.
    Try closing a PDF and notice that you can still choose File-Open so you can open more PDF's.

    Because Windows is a single-windowed non multi-tasking OS Adobe's Reader will quit requiring the app to start up each time you open a new PDF.

    Same goes for the web browsers, Firefox and Safari. They should not quit when closing the window because you can still hit File-New Window.

    The nice thing about a multi-tasking OS such as OS X is that you can work on lots of programs without having them quit every time you close windows unless they are required to quit.
    Apps remaining open will not use hardly any memory or load the CPU.
     

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