Wired router

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Darth Maynard, Sep 22, 2009.

  1. Darth Maynard macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    #1
    Hello friends,

    Looking into a wired router. Wireless isn't a possibility at the moment and wondered what is the most reliable for my G5 2.0 DP and my girlfriend's imac G5 2.0. Both are running 10.4.

    Any and all suggestions appreciated.:)

    Thanks
     
  2. rowsdower macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    #2
    I think that iMac has gigabit ethernet support so you might want to consider getting a router that also supports it, at least if you are transferring large files. Otherwise, they're pretty much all the same. It might not be much cheaper anymore to get one that doesn't have wireless.
     
  3. tofagerl macrumors 6502a

    tofagerl

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    #3
    Well, if you get one with wireless, you'll either get a cheap .g (slow) router, or a more expensive .n (fast) router. Especially if you need gigabit.
    I'd just go for a wired Linksys router and get a dedicated .n-router when you need it. The prices should be lower then.
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #4
    anything cisco or linksys is highly recommended. 4 port at a minimum. make sure it supports cat6 and cat5
     
  5. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #5
    With equipment that supports UTP cable, they state speeds, not grades of cable really. If they support 10BaseT or above, they'll support UTP cable, regardless of category.
     
  6. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #6
    hmm i guess. my experience is that cat6 supports a lot higher data rate transfers the cat5 because of a few factors.. so i just put it out there.

    not many consumer routers support 10BaseT though!
     
  7. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #7
    True, CAT6 supports higher data rates, but the devices support UTP and RJ-45 connectors. I have never seen a router or a switch specify the category of cabling. That said, you need to use the correct cabling according to the speeds you desire.

    Sure they do. The fact they support 10 Mb over UTP/RJ-45 is 10BaseT. Normally, the switches are 10/100 or 10/100/1000, so they definitely support 10BaseT. I don't think a consumer router out there is gigabit only (or 100 Mb only for that matter).
     
  8. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #8
    yes fair call. i have seen it advertised, but not on the manufacturer website (reseller).


    HA! can you tell im tired? i thought you meant 10GbE for some wierd reason. to me personally, 1000BaseT is a must.

    bed time calls, be back in the morning.
     
  9. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #9
    Good night. :)
     
  10. tonyled macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    #10
    cat6 and cat5e both support gigabit speeds

    i would get a netgear over a linksys for soho type stuff
     
  11. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    #11
    Linksys or Apple.
    You can turn off wireless part.
    You can get inexpensive gigabit ethernet switch if your router doesn't have gigabit ports.

    Nope. Most people notice that netgear products needs regular reboot to work.
     
  12. tonyled macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    #12
    I guess I am not most people then since i use about 20 of them here in the office on a daily basis with zero problems (most are 4 years old or older), and they all replaced linksys that my predecessor installed which to say they were unreliable then would be a gross understatement.

    Funny though, I do run linksys at home with dd-wrt on a wrt54 and a wap and both require regular reboots.

    one mans trash . . .
     
  13. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #13
    20 netgear residential routers? Personally, I've never had good luck with Netgear residential routers. Their switches seem to be a lot more reliable than their routers though.
     
  14. tonyled macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    #14
    routers, waps, switches, etc . . . im a network engineer by trade but there are plenty of circumstances where using soho stuff is more cost effective
     
  15. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #15
    That's a better clarification. We're talking residential gear, so claiming you have 20 running implies you have 20 residential routers.

    There's no way I'd ever advise an average person at home to buy SOHO equipment. It's just money wasted. My cheap Linksys WRT54G is over 5-6 years old and running fine.
     
  16. tonyled macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    #16
    i consider anything bought off the shelf as soho, which is likely the greater miscommunication (they were bought off the shelf at best buy so call them residential if you will, potato: potahto)

    i too run the wrt54g, it had died, i wanted to try out dd-wrt, it now has new life :D
     

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