Wireless Ethernet Hub

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by Luthersnewboots, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Luthersnewboots macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2015
    #1
    Hi all, I run a small business and have an Apple Airport Extreme for the wireless hub, and extend the signal to an old airport time capsule (Flat model). I use this method to extend the wifi signal from the AE to the TC and use the ethernet ports on the back of the time capsule to connect two VOIP phones.
    We are having issues with the phones, and it seems to be levelled at the signal between the AE and the TC.
    I cannot use ethernet as there is no way to run a cable across the office.
    What are my options for getting a more secure connection for what is essentially an ethernet hub?
    LB.
     
  2. belvdr macrumors 603

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    Aug 15, 2005
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    #2
    Hiring a contractor to run the low voltage cable is the best way. Powerline adapters are another way, but I wouldn't run a business on them.
     
  3. Luthersnewboots thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2015
    #3
    You mean an ethernet cable?
     
  4. belvdr macrumors 603

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    #4
    Yes. They can usually run these through eyelets and will guarantee their work too.
     
  5. techwarrior macrumors 65816

    techwarrior

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #5
    Powerline adapters work well for me at home, not sure why belvdr is suggesting not recommended for a biz environment unless it has to do with security (other offices may share the same power circuits).

    Most powerline adapters support security, and it is pretty easy to setup and pair the adapters. If your power is on the same circuit (both adapters plug into outlets that share a breaker), you can get near 1Gbps (or better) over powerline. Could be a little less with outlets that cross circuits. If you consider going this route, don't skimp, newer tech units that support higher speeds will cost a bit more than older gen stuff with slower speeds.

    But, if your office power is shared with other tenants, they might be able to access your network. In this case, paying someone to pull ethernet to the remote location might be warranted.

    Keep in mind, VoIP phones use very little bandwidth other than when updating firmware. VoIP calls typically use 64kbps (G.711) or less for voice calls. So, bandwidth may not be a critical factor for the backhaul link between Airports.

    EDIT: 64kbps is UDP, if using TCP\TLS, maybe up to 90kbps.
     
  6. belvdr macrumors 603

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    #6
    My advice against powerline adapters for business is due to the following, in addition to your comment above:
    1. In an office environment, you never know how the electricity is wired. Plenty of noise on these circuits from lighting to a heater in a cube. You may not even get the units to pair.
    2. I simply wouldn't trust such a device to keep a business going. I use them at home, but it matters much less if it fails there.
    3. A run of Ethernet cable shouldn't cost much more than the Powerline adapters themselves.
     

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