Wireless networking and ethernet switches.

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by captain frys, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. captain frys macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    #1
    Hey, this doesn't relate to "apple" peripherals but I own a Mac, so yeah.

    Anyway, I've got a wireless router (TRENDnet TEW-613BRP) on one end of my house, and wouldn't you figure, my reception on the other end sucks. I would like to know if there is either a way to amplify my signal, use a wireless bridge of some sort (is there something that can pick up and relay my current signal, as in not be wired directly to the router?) or is there a such thing as a wireless ethernet switch? Thanks so much!

    (My whole goal is to avoid wiring the router to a central location because moving my modem isn't an option, it's one of those all-in-one Phone line/internet/Cable TV Gateways from Qwest)

    -Justin
     
  2. SnowLeopard2008 macrumors 604

    SnowLeopard2008

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #2
    Sounds like an airport express, just plug it into a wall and set it up using ur mac to avoid installing any software on other pcs in the house if you have any. select bridge mode and find your network. again this is done wireless, in WDS or bridge mode, so just plug into a wall and set it up. no wires, not even a power cord, as there already is a ac plug,
     
  3. gwsat macrumors 68000

    gwsat

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Location:
    Tulsa
    #3
    Airport Express seems like the answer to me, too. I need to get one for my kitchen, where my PowerBook G4 is kept. Right now, my network connectivity there ranges from slim to none but I believe an Airport Express, set to Extend a Wireless Network would do the trick.
     
  4. operator207 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    #4
    2 choices, extend your existing wifi network using another access point wirelessly, or wired.

    Wired is going to give you the most wifi bandwidth, wireless is going to cut in half the wireless bandwidth between the 2 wifi access points. 54mbits is now 27mbits.

    If you can, run a wire to the other wifi access point.

    If your wanting to do some work, find a wrt54g router you can install dd-wrt. Get 2 of them (~$60 each, cheaper sometimes on Ebay with dd-wrt installed already) and use WDS in them, crank up the amp to extend their range further and if you want to really extend the range, get some better than stock antennas.

    I am not sure the size of your house, but my Belkin on one side of my house would give me spotty connections on the other side of my house. My DD-WRT hung in the same location, gives me spottLESS connections on the other side of my house, and even to that sides next door neighbors front yard. It gets spotty when I am in their driveway though. All I did was increase the amp's output. Off hand I cannot remember how high I went, but it was much higher than stock on those units.

    Those TrendNets are crap in my opinion. An ISP I worked for sold them for a few months to our broadband customers. We spent more money shipping them back for RMA's than we made in profit selling them.

    Edit: I say TrendNet in general, I have never heard of the specific model you refer to.
     
  5. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #5
    Good luck with using a non-apple device as the main base station, sometimes apparenlty it doesn't "just work" (something to do with the way passwords are handled). might be an easier setup to purchase a second airport and plug it in directly to your existing router, and use that for your wireless.
    There is a post Here that i found, you may have to drop your network to WEP (easily crackable) to get it to work.
    Or go with a non-apple unit.

    also you will take a speed hit when relayed as opposed to a straight connection to a wireless base station.

    If you can get an Ethernet cable to a central location and plug the express into that it would be your best bet. if the network is setup properly, your devices will "roam" from one base to the other seamlessly.
     

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