Work advice

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by pvmacguy, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. pvmacguy macrumors 65816

    pvmacguy

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Jax
    #1
    So I have worked for my boss for over 2 years now, first started working for him when I was 16 almost 17. He owned an AT&T store and took me on as a sales rep. Recently he closed down the store and opened two Verizon locations. Even-though, the laps on employment between the two stores I stayed with him and helped him open the locations. Recently he has hired a large amount of other employees because it used to just be the two of us and has started to promote the new highree's who I have trained into managerial positions.

    I havent really said anything about but kinda hinted at I wanted somewhat of a higher position than just a measely sales rep. After all, I create all the price tags, do inventory, know the ins and outs of both our sales and cellular systems. Know the ins and outs of all our equipment we sell as well. But why hire someone with no (phone) sales experience and offer promotion to manager with only 3 weeks of experience.??

    I plan on speaking with him about the situation tomorrow, but wondering if anyone has any advice. If he doesn't give me a honest good reason as to why, or offer me some kind of promotion be it assist. manager or manager then I feel as if I should resign because there is obviously no room to move up in his little company. Advice??

    Thanks guys! :D
     
  2. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #2
    Unfortunately when you start with a company at a young age you fall into that trap where you're taken advantage of. I have a great deal of experience in that area and can honestly say that despite the emotions you may feel about leaving, it may very well be time. If you're about 19 and you haven't moved at all then I seriously suggest moving on so that build your career path. However, before you do, do talk to him and tell him that you're not just looking for a job but you're looking for a career. Sure, AT&T and Verizon may not be your bag later on, but management and leadership very well may be. I would seriously suggest figuring out what you want in life and then share it with your boss. I don't mean on a personal level per se but on a professional level.

    Good luck. At 19 it is good to see that you have goals outside riding your parents' wallets.
     
  3. appledyl macrumors regular

    appledyl

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    I agree with Jessica. Try another company. It WILL build on your career, up to your final job not be some little high-ranking worker in a tiny busines...
     
  4. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #4
    The size of the business isn't as important unless your goal is to work for a fortune 500 or something. I know many people who have made a great living working their way up the ranks in small companies. I for one would take a pay cut and give up my awesome setup to actually work for a small company who really cared. Even still, having started up something with someone, watching him hire and me train my own bosses was not my bag. By the time I was about 17 1/2 I figured it out and left.
     
  5. pvmacguy thread starter macrumors 65816

    pvmacguy

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Jax
    #5
    Thanks Jessica and Appledyl. Jessica, it really sounds like you were once in the same boat as I am now, so you advice is very very helpful at re-affirming confronting him about the situation. I already have decided that Verizon and AT&T aren't going to be my life long career and thats why I'm in school to get a degree in computer science/IT so I can persue my passion. But this was a great little job and getting my feat wet in the working world. But a measely little sales rep. position won't cut it when it comes time to start living on my own and going to school. Thanks again!
     
  6. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #6
    You could do ok in sales but after two years with a company I firmly believe you have to decide what type of career path you want and whether it is available there. You should consider that even being a manager for a retail outlet is still management experience. It's not what you oversee it's that you manage. If you get my drift.

    I also believe that it is nearly crucial in today's world to have practical knowledge. I don't think a degree is the be all end all. With 15 years under my belt and two degrees I can honestly say that I would not be half the employee I am today without the work experience and that is just my relevant work experience. I could have rode my parents' wallets until I was 30 but I picked another path. It's tougher but I'm far from one to hide behind someone else's accomplishments.
     
  7. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #7
    Are you really good at selling the products? I say this because it's just a fact in the business world that people are good at different aspects of business. Often people are passed over for management roles because they are too valuable to the company in the position they have. Management is a beast of a job in and of itself. Supervisors have a difficult job and middle management can be quite the unique "between a rock and a hard place" role.

    It sounds like you have a good career plan with school and a chosen direction. I think talking to him is a good idea, but be careful how you handle the conversation because you do not want him to feel like you are putting forth an ultimatum. And, really think about what you want based on how it fits in your overall career plan and present lifestyle. If this job works well with your school schedule, gives you valuable experience, and pays decently then you would be wise to consider that. In this economy finding a new job might be difficult and who knows if the new job will fit your schedule as well as this one does. Sometimes when you are young a stop gap job is valuable.

    Best of luck with your decision and the conversation. Keep us posted on how it goes.
     

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