'World's First Swim App' on Apple Watch Put to the Test in New Video

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jul 6, 2015.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    [​IMG]


    In the days and weeks after its launch last April, one of the biggest curiosities surrounding the Apple Watch was its tolerance to water. Thanks to a few initial tests -- from showers to high dive pools -- we now know that the Apple Watch is indeed a bit more waterproof than Apple promises, and with that in mind a few London-based iOS developers have created the "World's first swim app on the Apple Watch," and put it through its paces in a new video.

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    Having designed a similar app for the Pebble, Ted Bradley and his team decided to take that idea -- a lapping, time, and heart rate monitoring swim app -- and transplant it onto the Apple Watch. The developers put each smartwatch to the same test, swimming four full lengths of the London Aquatic Centre's 50 meter pool. The test proved successful, with the Apple Watch mirroring the Pebble's results of a four lap, 200 meter swim. Apple's smartwatch even continued to measure heart rate successfully, raising from an initial 88bpm to 138bpm immediately after the test finished.

    The only downside for the app is that the Apple Watch experiences a tiny bit of lag when waking it up to check out lap times, the developers explaining that only when the screen is awake can the app run through the data samples collected from the swim and take a few seconds to parse through the information and display it on screen. Elsewhere, the swimming data isn't locked into the app, all of the workout and heart rate information getting delivered to HealthKit like any other workout and adding to a user's daily exercise and move goals.


    Of course, even though the app works, the developers are still referring to it as an "interesting technology demo," seeing that App Store Guidelines will immediately shut it down for encouraging users to use the Watch "in a way that may cause damage to the device." In the end, the app's creators just hope that Apple hears the calls for a fully-waterproof smartwatch and includes such features in the device's next generation.
    The full blog post, where Bradley goes into detail about everything from his inspiration for creating the swim app to architectural challenges the team faced in creating it, is definitely worth a read.

    Article Link: 'World's First Swim App' on Apple Watch Put to the Test in New Video
     
  2. The Doctor11 macrumors 603

    The Doctor11

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  3. 73b macrumors regular

    73b

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    My only complaint I have about the Apple Watch is that the sport model is not really durable enough for a lot of sports. I'm nervous to wear my watch to the beach or during any sport where I might be hitting the ground too hard. Of course, I can't take it swimming either. Apple could design a much more durable watch that is completely waterproof and still looks good. I don't know why "sport" for them just means cheaper and lighter.
     
  4. AngerDanger macrumors 68040

    AngerDanger

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    Ah, there's nothing like developing within limitations to really hone one's skills. It's the programming equivalent of high-altitude training.
     
  5. DTphonehome macrumors 68000

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    I don't know why Apple didn't fully waterproof the Watch. Perhaps at least the sport version. It seems that it's pretty much waterproof anyway… add a couple gaskets and go for full waterproofing already.
     
  6. mazz0 macrumors 68000

    mazz0

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    What I'd like to know is why can't they make touch screens work underwater? They work on different in capacitance, right? Surely there's a difference between water and human skin in water - can't they just calibrate it to detect that?
     
  7. mazz0, Jul 6, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2015

    mazz0 macrumors 68000

    mazz0

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    Of course you can! It almost certainly won't break, and if it does take it to the Apple shop and tell them it broke while you were washing your hands (or de-sticking the crown).
     
  8. 6836838 Suspended

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    Not a chance Apple will approve that. Their lawyers will never allow it!
     
  9. ElctrcJellyfish macrumors member

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    This is fantastic. I want the waterproofed Apple Watch so much.
     
  10. Rogifan macrumors Core

    Rogifan

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    Seems like you need a Garmin or something.
     
  11. Quu macrumors 68030

    Quu

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    I think it's clear that the watch is waterproof but Apple didn't want to have it fail and have to refund people or have a lawsuit or class action if it wasn't durable enough to stay waterproof over the life of the watch.

    I would expect the 2nd or 3rd Apple Watch to be advertised as waterproof once they have more data about the durability of the water seals.
     
  12. manu chao macrumors 603

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    Do you think they started with the idea of making a 'Sport' model and then decided its features? Or wasn't it rather the other way around, they decided to make different models with different materials and price points and then decided on names for them?
     
  13. Rogifan macrumors Core

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    I think it's the latter. But luckily for people who use their watch in situations where it could get beat up there are cases you can buy to protect it.
     
  14. manu chao macrumors 603

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    The skin does squat for your capacitance (try using a capacitance screen with a thick piece of leather, it won't work). Capacitance screens work because our body is 70% water. Under water the screen suddenly sees 100% water on the whole screen (yes the screen could then recognise if an object with only 70% water is brought to the screen, but (a) I don't think the logic behind the screens is programmed for this case and (b) the difference between 100% and 70% is smaller than that between 0% (air) and 70% (finger)). Note how already a little bit of water on a capacitance screen screws things up (eg, using a trackpad with a few drops of water on it).
     
  15. SgtPepper12 macrumors 6502a

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    I really don't know any details about how the technology really works and what it really relies on, but I'd assume two problems: The difference is a lot smaller than usually (humans are mostly water) and the capacitance is not constant. I assume it is very different in salt water than in your bath tub. But I don't know a lot about the technology, as I said. Maybe someone else can clear this up.
     
  16. ivandr macrumors regular

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    I think it's the latter... They designed the watch, created material differentiation across three tiers (Gold/Sapphire vs SS/Sapphire vs Alum/Glass) and then came up with names for the three tiers.
     
  17. louiek macrumors 6502

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    I know what you're saying makes perfect sense, but I can happily control by iPhone through a pair of rubber gardening gloves or even a zip lock bag when I'm running. But yes, a few drops of water and its cactus.
     
  18. gsmornot macrumors 68030

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    What sports are you worried about? Around here, most of the physical sports I might do don't allow jewelry of any kind, no matter how strong the watch. Running and cycling are not impact sports unless you fall down. (I try not to do that) The beach and swimming have been no trouble, I wear mine in the pool and have been to several water parks with no problem. Not assuming anything but if the watch is affordable for you, you will wear it no matter what and just deal with it if something breaks. AppleCare+ is helpful too, which I have but have not needed yet. The two main advantages to me of the sport is the lower price and the lower weight. The cost is closer to other sport watch options and is just enough for most.
     
  19. manu chao macrumors 603

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    The rubber (or the skin) itself doesn't conduct electricity, it's the water inside your finger that conducts electricity. Capacitance screens work by inducing a small flow of electricity in objects held close enough to them. Instead of bags of water (eg, fingers) anything conduction electricity works (a piece of metal works fine). The trick is to get close enough (and have a large enough volume), our skin is thin enough for this to work and extra layer of thin plastic or rubber doesn't hinder things much.
     
  20. Zxxv macrumors 68040

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    nice, but you do know once the general public sees water based apps in the app store they will take to the pools for an hour to 2 hours at a time. Does the apple watch hold up under those conditions or will apple outlaw swim based water apps?
     
  21. Zxxv macrumors 68040

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    nah, most likely they started with watch os and then cased it.
     
  22. MH01 Suspended

    MH01

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    Excellent work by the developers. Hopefully the second version of the watch will allow for it to be used in a pool
     
  23. Surreal macrumors 6502a

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    The sport has better impact/shatter resistance but lower scratch tolerance.
     
  24. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    Agreed. I don't have an Apple Watch but I do have a Pebble. I wear it for running, swimming, hiking, etc., and I've worn it to the beach as well. And honestly, I've had my fair share of nasty falls while running, and I've never landed on my watch...if anything my watch band has protected the underside of my wrist from getting torn up.
     
  25. Dagless Suspended

    Dagless

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    It's not called the "sports" model because it's better suited for sports, it's because they can't call it the "budget" model. It's not stronger, more durable than its more expensive siblings.
     

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