Would you hire someone who graduated late?

SuperCompu2

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 23, 2006
852
1
MA
Hi Everyone,

Due to some recent circumstances, I may end up finding myself in a situation where I do not graduate from school (college/university) on time.

My question for you is, how negatively does graduating late (not super late, like fall of intended year, or maybe the next year) affect hiring for recent grads out of school?

Also, if anyone else here graduated from school later than intended, did you find it particularly difficult finding work out of school?

I look forward to the replies!
 

mobilehaathi

macrumors G3
Aug 19, 2008
9,351
6,219
The Anthropocene
Hi Everyone,

Due to some recent circumstances, I may end up finding myself in a situation where I do not graduate from school (college/university) on time.

My question for you is, how negatively does graduating late (not super late, like fall of intended year, or maybe the next year) affect hiring for recent grads out of school?

Also, if anyone else here graduated from school later than intended, did you find it particularly difficult finding work out of school?

I look forward to the replies!
I took a 5th year largely due to my switching majors as if I had ADHD. No one has ever treated me as if I'm deficient in any way. I'm a career academic though, so I'm not sure my experiences will be informative for you.

IMO though, I can't see this as a big deal unless you're taking longer because you're failing.
 

zioxide

macrumors 603
Dec 11, 2006
5,737
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Plenty of people go to school part time because of work or other situations. When you graduate, you graduate. That's all that matters.
 

svenn

macrumors 6502
Aug 11, 2010
269
0
I don't think it matters. How would anyone even know? If you put any dates at all, put the grad date only.
 

Big-TDI-Guy

macrumors 68030
Jan 11, 2007
2,606
11
These days, finding work is hard for just about everyone, whether they graduated at 15 years old, or they took an extra 7.

The criteria most employers use differ quite a bit from how students are graded. At least, that is what I've found in my experience.

To echo what's been said already, the fact you graduated is what matters.

Good luck!
 

iRCL

macrumors 6502
Nov 2, 2011
284
0
It's meaningless, nobody will care at all. You are on the cusp of the real world where you'll find most of these things you'd worry about aren't reality. Just hope that you majored in something worthwhile - that's the only thing you need to be concerned about :) Good luck
 

steve2112

macrumors 68040
Feb 20, 2009
3,023
6
East of Lyra, Northwest of Pegasus
I'll just relate my story. Between changing majors, dropping out (a couple of times), and going to work full time and dropping to part time student, it took me 10 years to get my B.A. It has never been a problem in any job I have had. Maybe there were some places that didn't hire me because of it, but it hasn't prevented me from getting employment. I have to admit it has been somewhat awkward when filling out paperwork for a job and having to fill in that section on schools attended, and how long you attended. :)
 

SuperCompu2

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 23, 2006
852
1
MA
Thanks for the replies guys! I appreciate the responses, and hope I can have as fortunate of circumstances as you've all had.
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,044
116
Canada, eh?
I would think that it MIGHT impact your very first job, where you have no real previous experience on your resume so the recruiters have nothing else to look at except your school history. But I doubt even that would be a big deal, just explain your situation.

After the first job, nobody will care, they'll be looking at your previous job history, and what kind of education you have (not how long it took you to get it).

Good luck!
 

dakwar

macrumors 6502
Nov 2, 2010
310
1
I'm in a similar situation (graduating late) and it sucks, especially thinking about future employment opportunities. Thanks for all the upbeat posts dudes. Thumbs up.
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
142
Thanks for the replies guys! I appreciate the responses, and hope I can have as fortunate of circumstances as you've all had.
I don't think it is fortune, I think it's just how it is. As someone else stated, no one can really tell based on the length of time it took to graduate whether it was because you went part time or because you screwed around and failed. The fact that you hold a diploma in your hand is what will matter. You could explain your situation if asked but I would not volunteer any information that you believe will hold you back. Your situation is not unique and seen frequently for any number of reasons.
 

arkitect

macrumors 603
Sep 5, 2005
5,908
5,496
Bath, United Kingdom
Also, if anyone else here graduated from school later than intended, did you find it particularly difficult finding work out of school?
I spent an extra year on my Architecture degree but that was because I got bit by the travel bug…

Doing the rounds with my portfolio I was pleasantly surprised by the offers of work.

No one bothers, as long as you have that piece of paper/parchment and the skills you'll be fine.

Good luck. :)
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
8,931
1,598
New England, USA
There is no such thing as late.

I hold the Indiana University Psych Dept record for the longest start to finish. It took me forever to finish my Doctoral Dissertation. No one gives a damn as long as you get your degree, had half way decent grades, and didn't do time for holding up any banks to finance school.:D
 
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boy-better-know

macrumors 65816
Jun 30, 2010
1,343
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England
We don't do that in the UK, no matter how terrible someone is at school, you will always stay in the same year.
I think it is terrible that people get held back a year, though I can't say that I fully understand the educational system in US, I do feel for students who might get held back. I imagine it to be really horrible starting a new year with new people and watching your friends moving on.
Anyway, I am sure any employer would like to know the circumstances of why you were held back.

----------

Graduating from Uni late isn't a problem though, I and many of my friends took a gap year. I think a year out can be important so you don't spend Uni in that school like bubble.
 

arkitect

macrumors 603
Sep 5, 2005
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Bath, United Kingdom
We don't do that in the UK, no matter how terrible someone is at school, you will always stay in the same year.
I think it is terrible that people get held back a year, though I can't say that I fully understand the educational system in US, I do feel for students who might get held back. I imagine it to be really horrible starting a new year with new people and watching your friends moving on.
Anyway, I am sure any employer would like to know the circumstances of why you were held back.


Not UK school, US school. ;)

Edit: Ah, I see you added another paragraph.
 

mobilehaathi

macrumors G3
Aug 19, 2008
9,351
6,219
The Anthropocene
OP is not necessarily "getting held back a year." There are plenty of reasons why one takes an extra year.

We don't do that in the UK, no matter how terrible someone is at school, you will always stay in the same year.
I think it is terrible that people get held back a year, though I can't say that I fully understand the educational system in US, I do feel for students who might get held back. I imagine it to be really horrible starting a new year with new people and watching your friends moving on.
Anyway, I am sure any employer would like to know the circumstances of why you were held back.

----------

Graduating from Uni late isn't a problem though, I and many of my friends took a gap year. I think a year out can be important so you don't spend Uni in that school like bubble.
 

tktaylor1

macrumors 6502a
Feb 16, 2010
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Nashville, TN
I will be going an extra year due to transferring credits and classes I have to take at a certain school. They don't care as long as you have that degree.
 

boy-better-know

macrumors 65816
Jun 30, 2010
1,343
120
England
OP is not necessarily "getting held back a year." There are plenty of reasons why one takes an extra year.
I understand that, I was just going off on a tangent. Also would like to say it isn't an attack on the US education system. If anything it forces you to try harder. I just feel for the ones who aren't intelligent enough or don't pass for whatever reason. I'm blabbing on now.
I just enjoy thinking about the difference in our two western cultures (UK/US). We all grow up over here watching american TV so most of us know a bit about US schooling and the like.
 

SuperCompu2

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 23, 2006
852
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MA
I don't think it is fortune, I think it's just how it is. As someone else stated, no one can really tell based on the length of time it took to graduate whether it was because you went part time or because you screwed around and failed. The fact that you hold a diploma in your hand is what will matter. You could explain your situation if asked but I would not volunteer any information that you believe will hold you back. Your situation is not unique and seen frequently for any number of reasons.
Yeah, this is what I thought, but I just feel nervous about going out into the real world and being eaten alive by my transcript. My school has a weird system when it comes to grades, so I feel as though questions may arise as to my graduation date.

These posts have been reassuring though. Thanks all! I hope it provides some confidence to some other students going through similar times...
 

BigPrince

macrumors 68020
Dec 27, 2006
2,052
105
I'd be more inclined to hire someone who graduated late actually if I could be bothered notice. I would take it as a sign of either extra studying or something happened that you survived and made you a better person for it.
 

chrono1081

macrumors 604
Jan 26, 2008
7,586
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Isla Nublar
Plenty of people go to school part time because of work or other situations. When you graduate, you graduate. That's all that matters.
This.

If anyone judges you based on when you graduate they probably are not a good person to work for.

Many people in the IT field do not have a degree, they they are just really good at what they do. Some places require a degree in order to advance, so sometimes these guys will go for an online one for the formality, even though they already know their craft inside and out.
 

SuperCompu2

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 23, 2006
852
1
MA
This.

If anyone judges you based on when you graduate they probably are not a good person to work for.

Many people in the IT field do not have a degree, they they are just really good at what they do. Some places require a degree in order to advance, so sometimes these guys will go for an online one for the formality, even though they already know their craft inside and out.
This is a fantastic point I never considered. I worked with a kid in IT who actually studied music, and never really thought too much about it. I may pursue IT, despite studying Electical and Computer Engineering. I find IT fun and challenging, while also seemingly easy. I guess work is fun when you love what you do!