Would you notice a jump for Early 2010 MBP?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by thormarketing, Oct 25, 2013.

  1. thormarketing macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    #1
    I can't understand how to actually consider the benchmark scores? Would it be really apparent to make the jump from an Early 2010 13" MBP that has already been upgraded to 8GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD?
     
  2. johnnylarue macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    #2
    Benchmark scores for CPUs alone have virtually doubled when compared to my 2010 MBP. Add a better GPU (and a much nicer display!) and yes, you would definitely notice an improvement--especially for graphically-intensive tasks, rendering, etc. That said, in everyday use it probably wouldn't be as drastic as the improvement you saw when you upgraded to an SSD--which for me was like night and day.

    Don't underestimate how nice those retina displays are, though. Much, much easier on the eyes.
     
  3. thormarketing thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    #3
    Thank you!
     
  4. guillemn macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    #4
    I am at exactly the same situation.
    I own a 2010 MBP with 256SSD and 8gb ram, but is not enough for the tasks I am doing it lags a lot, like photoshop. For normal tasks like emaling and so it is good.

    My first option is to buy a maxed out rMBP 15, since I do not need portability often, but still 1/2 times a month.

    Other options is to purchase and iMac and maintain current laptop for portability.

    How is the performance from iMac maxed out and rMBP maxed out???
     
  5. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2001
    #5
    I beg to differ. That better GPU is required to drive all those extra pixels. And just because a CPU score doubles in a benchmark certainly does not mean that there will be a doubling in the real world—not even close.

    The OP will notice the improvement and will enjoy the experience (especially if they use higher resolutions). Putting money aside, it's a great upgrade. But let's not overstate it.
     
  6. johnnylarue macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    #6
    I didn't mean to overstate the difference--I admittedly forgot to finish my thought with regards to limited value of benchmark scores and specs. And I overlooked the retina display's hefty GPU resource needs. (Although even given that, I still think GPUs have come a long way since the 320/330M chips that were in the 2010 MBPs... enough to provide a noticeable improvement, in any case.)

    In my defense though, I feel like I acquitted myself nicely when I subsequently pointed out that the perceivable improvements would not be as significant as the switch from HDD to SSD. Come on, you gotta give me half a point for that, right? :D

    And at the end of the day, the single most important or obvious improvement between these generations is the display. I stand by that assertion.
     
  7. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2001
    #7
    No, you absolutely did. I wasn't actually disagreeing with your post as much as I was wanting to make sure that the OP would temper his expectations.

    That said, in my earlier note, I glared over one really important performance issue that would make a difference, and that is quad core. Obviously, if the OP is sticking with a 13" model, that doesn't apply, but if the 15" is on the table, it makes so many things flat-out better.
     

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