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abluehaze

macrumors regular
Original poster
Aug 25, 2008
103
3
Considering ordering a iMac for a friend that plays a lot of WoW and would like to hear from someone that has one what kind of performance/fps they get with ultra settings and full resolution with the 780M under OSX.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:

jmcgeejr

macrumors 6502
Oct 7, 2010
469
40
Seattle, WA
OS X version runs obviously worse than Win version. AFAIK, under OS X he'll get around 50-70 fps, and 25m raid will be 30-40fps.

It depends on your settings too, the biggest hit I noticed was the distance drawing, if I kept that at medium it was pretty much always a decent smooth framerate (above 30-40) even in OSX, obviously in windows it runs much better, but if your mate wants to go that route it's more than decent enough and will look good and play well.
 

Shivetya

macrumors 68000
Jan 16, 2008
1,647
301
Considering ordering a iMac for a friend that plays a lot of WoW and would like to hear from someone that has one what kind of performance/fps they get with ultra settings and full resolution with the 780M under OSX.

Thanks in advance.

40-50 FPS 25 LFR native, some lows in the 30s but never not playable and never stuttering - but I do disable timemachine while playing WOW now

I do run vsync and most video options to max (will verify what I tweaked most because I liked the look better when some options were lower).


FWIW, I have run five copies of WOW at once on this iMac (and even on previous). The main is all on, 1920x1200 with four slaves (all options off and sound off) at 800x600 without any issues whatsoever. All with just 8g memory as WOW takes hardly any ram

System is using the 512 SSD
 

Xer

macrumors newbie
Jan 17, 2009
16
0
I have a stock (the highest one) Late 2013 iMac 27 with 3.4Ghz i5 and GTX 775MX 2GB and WoW runs smoothly in Raids on native resolution.
The game is pretty old so no problems there.
I also played Assassin's Creed 2 and Deus Ex Human Revolution on the highest settings with no problems at all, no lag (Mac versions).
 

Johnf1285

macrumors 6502a
Dec 25, 2010
960
57
New Jersey
Considering ordering a iMac for a friend that plays a lot of WoW and would like to hear from someone that has one what kind of performance/fps they get with ultra settings and full resolution with the 780M under OSX.

Thanks in advance.

I play Wow in OSX on an my iMac with an i7, 780m, 16gb ram and flash storage on the latest version of Mavericks.

Ultra settings tend to bog the system down a bit (in my opinion), particularly in the Pandaria zones as they're so rich in detail.

I actually keep my settings pretty much middle of the road. I can post a screenshot of my settings when I get home. I have probably spent way too much time finely tuning Wow settings on every Mac I have ran it on for the past 5 years, but with that being said, I've gained a better understand of what works and what doesn't.

I find that the settings I use tend to be the secret sauce for me. I get 60fps *nearly* everywhere. I run it at native resolution with v-sync enabled as I cannot stand tearing when rotating the camera.

The reason I keep the settings somewhat lower is that I really prefer a very smooth FPS experience. From what I've read, OS X by design will either clamp FPS at 30 or 60 when v-sync is enabled. When it cannot achieve a solid 60 FPS, it'll drop right down to 30 FPS. I really dislike the "up" and "down" in frame rates so I dialed the settings down.

However, a few items get cranked (texture resolution for example) but the rest stay pretty much in the middle - some are turned off totally, like SSAO and sunshafts.

I haven't messed with running it in Bootcamp, but I am sure it would be able to run everything maxed and retain similar frame rates. Hopefully the "drive/graphics API" gap can be closed between OS X and Windows sometime in the near future.

Hope this helps.
 

kaellar

macrumors 6502
Nov 12, 2012
441
17
OS X by design will either clamp FPS at 30 or 60 when v-sync is enabled. When it cannot achieve a solid 60 FPS, it'll drop right down to 30 FPS.
That's how vsync works everywhere. It has nothing to do with some "OS X thing" to it.
 

Johnf1285

macrumors 6502a
Dec 25, 2010
960
57
New Jersey
That's how vsync works everywhere. It has nothing to do with some "OS X thing" to it.

Gotcha. I admit I do not know much in this area but was basing my post off of what I read from a blue post on the Battle.net forum:

http://us.battle.net/wow/en/forum/topic/6397850110#7

Perhaps I was reading between the lines a bit too much as I interpreted this as an OS X exclusive v-sync interpretation as opposed to some differences in functionality with DirectX and whatever goes on in Windows.
 

kaellar

macrumors 6502
Nov 12, 2012
441
17
Perhaps I was reading between the lines a bit too much as I interpreted this as an OS X exclusive v-sync interpretation as opposed to some differences in functionality with DirectX and whatever goes on in Windows.

Well, OS X and Windows really use vsync a bit differently in graphics pipeline, but it doesn't change the core principle of it. And that principle is about passing the number of frames through the videocard's frame buffer, that's identical to display's refresh rate. That's the way to ensure that display's buffer gets the whole frames with no tearing or stuttering. If the GPU can't produce 60+ fps (60Hz is the most common refresh rate nowadays), the frame buffer will pass the same frame twice which will result in steady 30fps. If the GPU can't produce 30-60fps, the frame buffer will pass the same frame three times and you'll get 20fps. And so on :)
 

Johnf1285

macrumors 6502a
Dec 25, 2010
960
57
New Jersey
Well, OS X and Windows really use vsync a bit differently in graphics pipeline, but it doesn't change the core principle of it. And that principle is about passing the number of frames through the videocard's frame buffer, that's identical to display's refresh rate. That's the way to ensure that display's buffer gets the whole frames with no tearing or stuttering. If the GPU can't produce 60+ fps (60Hz is the most common refresh rate nowadays), the frame buffer will pass the same frame twice which will result in steady 30fps. If the GPU can't produce 30-60fps, the frame buffer will pass the same frame three times and you'll get 20fps. And so on :)

Ahh I see. Thank you for the informative post! Always like to learn something new each day
 
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