WYSIWYG editor, but with HTML coding?

Discussion in 'Web Design and Development' started by raymondu999, May 10, 2011.

  1. raymondu999 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    #1
    Hey guys; I'd like to know an app that is able to handle just coding right at the code; and also be able to handle things WYSIWYG style. Kind of like Dreamweaver, but for some reason Dreamweaver CS5 is VERY slow in Design view on my computer; Right now I'm using Espresso for now; but I'd like to be able to do WYSIWYG as well. Thanks!
     
  2. jrfive0 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
  3. newagemac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    #3
    Flux 3 is on the Mac App Store. It looks pretty nice for what you're looking for. I think the Rapidweaver team should be worried. I prefer Dreamweaver CS5.5 myself.
     
  4. AFPoster macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #4
    check out CMSMadeSimple.org it's a client management system, but it has a great WSIWYG module called TinyMCE.
     
  5. tmagman macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Location:
    Calgary AB
    #5
    Mozilla's old 'NVU' editor is pretty good. They've stopped developing it but its still out there. I even ran it off a USB drive and was great for coding and a little WYSIWYG editing.
     
  6. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #6
    The latest incarnation of Nvu is Blue Griffin (formerly Kompozer). It's free and does pretty good for the price. I don't use it for my main HTML, but it's nice for documentation that I write in HTML.
     
  7. raymondu999 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    #7
    Rapidweaver seem a bit... casual? For me... I need something more "industrial" like DreamWeaver, Coda or Espresso - something that isn't about using templates, but allows me to hardcode. Help (in the form of code completion/suggestions will be welcome, but not necessary). WYSIWYG editing (rather than just a "web preview" mode) is also necessary. Preferrably it also has a Coda/Espresso-style way of grouping files together into "sites" - so it's like a mini web IDE.
     
  8. macola2 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    #8
    Flux 4 may suit your needs, it's WYSIWYG and code friendly. Flux 3 wasn't so good at the code, but V4 is pretty decent.

    Randall
     
  9. NathanCH macrumors 65816

    NathanCH

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    #9
    Hey,

    I think this is the right path, and you should continue doing this. If you want to see what you're doing, open up the live preview in another window and lay them side-by-side so you can see it as you code. This is teach you to code not only the right way, but the fastest way.

    Harder at first, better in the long run.
     
  10. jablko macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Location:
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    #10
    I've never found any WYSIWYG editor that was easier to use than just learning to code. With that in mind, I highly recommend TacoHTML. It's a text editor that generates a live preview as you code. It used to be free, but now it costs. I found the fee to upgrade worth it.
     
  11. codycartoon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2002
    #11
    I created a site called http://scrollkit.com that might work for you here. You can create a site from scratch in the browser and it creates very vanilla HTML/CSS/.
     
  12. raymondu999 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    #12
    You do have a point. If I do choose this path - can Coda do it too? I'm itching to try out Coda 2 :D
     
  13. NathanCH macrumors 65816

    NathanCH

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    #13
    Yeah Coda 2 has this as well. Glad you're considering this option! :)
     
  14. TonyK macrumors 6502a

    TonyK

    Joined:
    May 24, 2009
    #14
    Yes RapidWeaver is template driven. It is also possible to code in it though not always recommended.

    RapidWeaver's primary use would be to get a user to a look and feel, then export that and then use some other tools to flesh out the code.

    Put the code of course in separate files, use a CMS and it should give one a great flexibility and productivity.

    There are tools for modifying RapidWeaver themes so it should not be an issue for rapid prototyping.
     

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