Xcode : install Ok but now how to start it ?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by bcostacurta, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. bcostacurta macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Location:
    Luxembourg - Europe
    #1
    Hello,

    I installed Xcode. It is installed under /Developer/Applications/Xcode.app, but how to start it ??

    The path is not update neither link created to start it.
    Should I update the path or create a link to which file ?

    Note : I'm a newbie under Apple and really confused about such (apparently) easy thing : start an installed application like Xcode.

    Thanks for any help and explanation

    Regards,
    Bruno
     
  2. lloyddean macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Location:
    Des Moines, WA
    #2
    I believe I already answered this for you in your thread "Looking for an Editor" with this post

    Please let me know what part of the post didn't you understand?
     
  3. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #3
    1. In Finder, open the window where Xcode is located.

    2. Double-click the Xcode icon.

    If you have trouble with step 1, you should familiarize yourself with basic Mac navigation of folders.

    If you insist on using pathnames for navigation, look under the Go menu in Finder, and choose "Go to Folder...", then enter the pathname /Developer/Applications/. You might notice some other things under the Go menu. You should look at them.

    Mac OS X is not fundamentally a command-line user experience. If you always use only command-lines, you will always be going against the overall design.
     
  4. sanPietro98 macrumors 6502a

    sanPietro98

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    #4
    If you still can't find the App Icon, use Spotlight. That's the magnifying glass icon in the upper-right of your screen. Click it, type xcode and voila.
     
  5. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

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    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #5
    FWIW - you can launch apps from CL

    Code:
    open -a /Developer/Applications/Xcode.app
     
  6. lloyddean macrumors 6502a

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    May 10, 2009
    Location:
    Des Moines, WA
    #6
    To simplify: open -a Xcode
     
  7. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    Space--The ONLY Frontier
  8. zippyfly macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #8
    In case you do not have sufficient suggestions how to launch Xcode (haha) here's another way:

    Go to Finder

    Hit COMMAND + SHIFT + H

    That brings your Home directory

    Press COMMAND + UP ARROW a couple of times

    Now you should be at the root of your boot hard disk

    See the /Developer folder

    Use ARROW KEYS to move to it so it is highlighted

    Press COMMAND + DOWN ARROW

    See the /Applications folder

    Press COMMAND + DOWN again

    Now you should see Xcode and Interface Builder

    COMMAND SELECT both of them, and DRAG TO YOUR DOCK
     
  9. bcostacurta thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Location:
    Luxembourg - Europe
    #9




    Thanks to all for advices (and your great patience).

    Indeed the Apple interface is certainly something I have to learn.
    However I find some concrete ways to start Xcode by reading you.
    And so I improve to feel more comfortable with MacOSX

    Bye,
    Bruno
     
  10. macFirst macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    #10
    Hi Bruno,

    I am new to Mac too...and was searching for an easy answer on how to access xcode....and came across your request...

    Here is a simple way to access xcode and other tools...as suggested by chown33...

    1. Click "Finder" on the Dock
    2. In the "Finder" Click "Macintosh HD" under Devices (this has a Hard Disk Image...in case you have changed this default name...this device will have a custom name (I hope) given by you)
    3. Double click "Developer" folder
    4. Double click "Applications" folder...and here you can access (a) xcode, (b) Interface Builder, (c) Instruments etc.

    Hope you have already figured out how to access...if not...hope the above helps.

    Raghav
     
  11. jwhittin macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    #11
    One reason for confusion

    I should point out that the Wrox Snow Leopard book tells you to "Launch /Developer/Applications/Xcode.app". This looks like a CLI command, but as others have pointed out, you have to run open -a to get it to work.
     
  12. torem13 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2011
    #12
    open -a Xcode error

    Can some tell me how to get the command open -a Xcode to work. Do I need to set up a path to /Developer/Application/? I can open it by using the longer version open -a /Developer/Application/Xcode.app or by using the varius ways in Finder, however simply typing open -a Xcode gives the error "Unable to find application. Thanks.
     
  13. Germwise macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 2, 2009
    #13
    Lets not be jerks.

    Actually the first time I installed xcode 3.2.6 for some reason It installed the emulator files but not the executable xcode application. Try to reinstall and make sure you let it go through all the way. aftewards a spotlight search will help you
     
  14. erin0002 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Location:
    singapore
    #14
    [/COLOR]
    hi Raghav, i'm new to mac too. i tried to follow your step but i can't complete step 4. when i double click the application folder, there's no Xcode inside. there's only 'performance tools' and 'utilities'. do you know what is wrong and how to fix it?
    thank you very much. =)

    ----------


    hello, i've tried to follow your step till i've found the application folder. when i double click the application folder, there's no Xcode inside. there's only 'performance tools' and 'utilities'. do you know what is wrong and how to fix it?
    thank you very much. =)
     
  15. jiminaus macrumors 65816

    jiminaus

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    Dec 16, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney
    #15
    You're looking at /Applications not /Developer/Applications.

    The simplest way to start XCode is to use spotlight. Click on the magnifying class in the top-right corner of your screen. Type XCode. Click XCode next to Applications.

    Then once XCode has started, right the XCode in the dock and select Keep in Dock (under Options?). Then you can just start XCode by clicking the dock icon.
     
  16. erin0002, Sep 4, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2011

    erin0002 macrumors newbie

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    Sep 4, 2011
    Location:
    singapore
    #16
    is it possible that i download the wrong app?
    i downloaded it from this link.
    http://mac.softpedia.com/progDownload/Apple-Xcode-Download-7935.html

    choosing the 'external mirror 2'

    thank you for your help. =)

    ----------

    thank you for the comment. =)

    i think i might have looked it at the right applications. because i go to developer, click on it, and find the application folder inside the developer.

    i've tried the spot light too. But I can't find the Xcode next to application. there are Xcode on 'top hit', 'folder', 'webpage' ,'developer', 'look up', 'web searches'.
    i've tried clicking them all 1by1 too. but there even inside those folder, there is no Xcode icon. For example, inside the Xcode folder, inside it there are other folders like 'file templates', 'specifications', target templates', etc..

    hello =)
    maybe i've installed the wrong thing, since i can't find the Xcode app using spotlight.. >< so may i know how to install the correct one?
    and what do you mean & how to let it go through all the way?
    thanks =)
     
  17. adildacoolset macrumors 65816

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    Sep 5, 2011
    Location:
    Lusaka, Zambia(If you know where it is)
    #17
    Why? Use spotlight, finder, or my favourite, launchpad

    ----------

    Since your mac is new, you may be able to get Xcode free on the mac appstore. That way, it will actually sit in your dock. If not, go to developer.apple.com. Register as an apple developer, and get Xcode+iOS SDK. You should get it originally, that way it will be simpler
     
  18. erin0002 macrumors newbie

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    Sep 4, 2011
    Location:
    singapore
    #18
    oh, okay, i'll try that.
    thank you very much =)
     
  19. adildacoolset macrumors 65816

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    Sep 5, 2011
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    Lusaka, Zambia(If you know where it is)
    #19
    Good luck. P.S. If you don't plan on developing for iPhone, you can get Xcode in the CD or flash drive that came with your Mac
     
  20. candytron macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    #20
    I had the same issue. Turns out the installer that I downloaded from Apple is the installer for the installer. Yeah. Very 'meta'. Look for an 'Install Xcode' application instead, then run that.
     
  21. CodeCavalier, Oct 25, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2011

    CodeCavalier macrumors newbie

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    Mar 30, 2011
    #21
    Hooray for the Command-Line

    Allow me to correct you. OS X WAS not fundamentally a command-line user experience. However, as of latter 2007 (couple years before your comment), OS X has "embraced and extended" the Open Unix architecture. (See: http://www.opengroup.org/openbrand/register/brand3555.htm)

    This was incredible foresight on the part of Apple because it has powered a market shift in the entire computer industry. More and more people are switching over to Mac from Windows and Unix than ever before. In my case, and I don't think I'm alone, I have made the switch primarily because of OS X's conversion to being an Open Unix based OS. As a web server administrator, I always have a command-line (aka: Terminal) window open on my desktop. I have come to love OS X because it now offers the best of both worlds--great GUI app support and the awesomely powerful underlying Open Unix architecture.

    However, we converts are going to pose the occasional "dumb questions," simply because we're relative newbies. I have learned a few really useful things reading through this thread that I never knew before, and I've been using Mac for nearly a year now.

    There seems to be a chip on the shoulders of classic Mac GUI purists, and it is evident in this thread, but I want to thank you anyway. Apparently, we noobs had to get you guys to start ranting so that we could get you to let some of the secrets out.

    As for the Xcode icon. When I installed Xcode on my OS X Lion, it launched the app after the install, and I right-clicked the icon in the dock and told it to stay there. Subsequently, however, I noticed there was NO Xcode icon in my Applications folder. Funny thing was, if I typed 'Xcode' into the magnifying glass, it would show me an Xcode icon in the Applications folder! (raising one eyebrow) I still don't know why this is the case.

    I now know that the Xcode icon is really in /Developer/Applications. Thanks for the help. ;)
     
  22. jiminaus macrumors 65816

    jiminaus

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney
    #22
    This was my case, except I'm not a web server admin. I used to boot Windows on a PC to support my hardware, and then straightaway boot FreeBSD in a virtual machine in full screen. I would spend my whole time in the virtual machine. At some point, I realised how absurd that situation was, and bought a Mac to get the best of both worlds.

    Similarly to you, even under X11 I was heavy command-line driven. I wouldn't even use a launcher, because it was just as easy to launch a program from the command-line.
     
  23. chown33, Oct 25, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2011

    chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #23
    Allow me to disagree. What I wrote is still true: Mac OS X is still not fundamentally a command-line user experience.

    The fact that it has command-line tools is not new. It has always had them. And they've always been Unixy commands. Certification of conformance to Open Unix architecture is a nice plus in the standardization direction, but it doesn't fundamentally change anything. The user experience is still not fundamentally command-line oriented.

    From the very first release, Terminal.app was there, and a fair number of commands were pre-installed. Installing the Developer Tools added even more, including compilers like gcc. Furthermore, Project Builder (Xcode's predecessor) has always worked by running command-line tools via scripts that build things. This is easily observable in the build log (detailed build output), where the rather lengthy command-lines can be seen. AFAIK, Xcode still works this way: it runs command-line tools like 'clang' to build and link things.


    There are also developer details like how apps are launched, and how they receive parameters such as the list of files to open.

    Again, Mac OS X is not fundamentally command-line oriented in this regard. If you're expecting main() to receive an argc and argv with the path to the file, you will be dismayed to see no such thing. Instead, files are passed by another mechanism entirely, essentially an event message with a parameter referencing the file(s). Programmers writing apps almost never see this event message, because the frameworks they use hide it, instead providing a callback-oriented architecture.


    Yes, I too almost always have Terminal.app running. I've done this since the 10.0 days (2001). My proficiency with Unix commands came long before Mac OS X, so having a command-line available has never been a big deal. The fact that I find a command-line useful doesn't mean that the typical user's experience of Mac OS X is in any way fundamentally command-line oriented.


    I see no evidence of chips on anyone's shoulders, least of all "classic Mac GUI purists" (whatever that means). This is a developer forum, and most of the people who post answers here regularly are well aware of command-lines. Certainly those with significant experience of Mac development are well acquainted with command line tools.

    The answer to the OP's question is basically "Make sure you're looking in the right folder" followed by "Double-click the Xcode icon you see there". Solutions using both Finder (GUI) and Terminal (command-line) were posted. I don't see how clarifying where one should look, or exactly what action to take, is evidence of a chip on one's shoulder.

    And even in my reply, I see no chips on shoulders. I, for one, am simply pointing out inaccuracies in your post, or questioning how you arrived at your conclusions.


    Neither do I. If you want an answer to this, you should simply have posted it as a question. You may need to provide more detail to get an answer, however.


    Glad to see that the earliest replies from 2009 are still accurate.
     
  24. lyzadmortem macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Location:
    home sweet home
    #24
    I had doubts about "wakeking up" an old posts but since my way is not mentioned, i'll give it a try:
    When i was done with download and install. I made an alias from Developer/Applications/Xcode.app and as i am used to run apps from Applications folder, i pasted the alias there and voila!
    Without having to deal with terminal or fs navigation.
     

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