Mac XCode on Catalina (MacBook)

wlisik

macrumors member
Original poster
Oct 7, 2018
58
4
Poland
Is it difficult to learn XCode for someone who never had anything to do with it?
 

casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,382
2,231
Horsens, Denmark
Is it difficult to learn how to use Microsoft Word, Pages, Libre Office etc? Or is it difficult being a writer?

Learning Xcode, no, not really. Learning programming is the question you should be asking though. And a lot like learning any other language, there isn't a fixed answer. Have you learned Spanish when you can communicate intentions even if it is very rough and inelegant? Or do you need to be fluent to say you know Spanish? And even when you are fluent, do you need to know every word in the dictionary, need to be able to write like a poet?

Don't approach it with the mentality of learning Xcode or you'll quickly feel frustrated and quit. Learning to program is not learning a program.

And difficulty depends on what you want to achieve in the end.
How difficult is it to learn to play guitar? Well it's difficult to learn to play like Mark Knopfler, but I can teach you to play a D chord fairly quickly.

And much like regular language, the more programming languages you learn, the easier learning a new one gets, because they share many of the same constructs, grammar, syntax.
 
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wlisik

macrumors member
Original poster
Oct 7, 2018
58
4
Poland
Is it difficult to learn how to use Microsoft Word, Pages, Libre Office etc? Or is it difficult being a writer?

Learning Xcode, no, not really. Learning programming is the question you should be asking though. And a lot like learning any other language, there isn't a fixed answer. Have you learned Spanish when you can communicate intentions even if it is very rough and inelegant? Or do you need to be fluent to say you know Spanish? And even when you are fluent, do you need to know every word in the dictionary, need to be able to write like a poet?

Don't approach it with the mentality of learning Xcode or you'll quickly feel frustrated and quit. Learning to program is not learning a program.

And difficulty depends on what you want to achieve in the end.
How difficult is it to learn to play guitar? Well it's difficult to learn to play like Mark Knopfler, but I can teach you to play a D chord fairly quickly.

And much like regular language, the more programming languages you learn, the easier learning a new one gets, because they share many of the same constructs, grammar, syntax.
This is not the answer I was looking to, but thanks anyway :)
 

szymczyk

macrumors regular
Mar 5, 2006
169
8
My guess is the real question is "Is it difficult to develop iOS apps with no programming experience?". The short answer is Yes because you need to learn both programming in general and iOS development.

If that is not the question, wlisik should clarify the question and be more specific about what he/she is looking for to get a better answer.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,382
2,231
Horsens, Denmark
My guess is the real question is "Is it difficult to develop iOS apps with no programming experience?". The short answer is Yes because you need to learn both programming in general and iOS development.
And a slightly longer answer would include
"But not if you want the app to just be a label saying 'hello'". :p
 

sundialsoft

macrumors newbie
Sep 2, 2010
28
1
Scotland
Is it difficult to learn XCode for someone who never had anything to do with it?
If you have no development experience you would need to set aside a lot of time to learn but the resources available online are excellent and many are free. Swift is getting fairly mature so it's a great time to get into it.

If you have used other development systems like visual studio then it's pretty easy.
 

topcat001

macrumors regular
Nov 17, 2019
146
60
Xcode is a nice environment. I find Visual Studio on Windows a bit more mature, but it also has a lot of issues/bugs. My main environment is vim + lldb on mac or vim + gdb on linux compared to which something like Xcode is much easier to get started with while learning programming. FWIW.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,382
2,231
Horsens, Denmark
Xcode is a nice environment. I find Visual Studio on Windows a bit more mature, but it also has a lot of issues/bugs. My main environment is vim + lldb on mac or vim + gdb on linux compared to which something like Xcode is much easier to get started with while learning programming. FWIW.
Xcode has a good share of bugs as well though. I've never really liked VS, but VS Code should have a shoutout. I have very little experience with it, but it's a cross-platform environment, very extensible, and almost universally loved. Personally I spend a lot of time in the JetBrains IDEs. They're excellent, though I also enjoy Xcode.

Anyways, main reason I'm quoting you... Why would you use Vim as your primary editor? Don't get me wrong, Vim is amazing and if all you have is a TTY it's a great choice. But with the ability to pick "Vim shortcuts" for either JetBrains' IDEs or VS code, and all the additional niceties they offer, like being able to type a single letter of a function and click enter and have it all auto-complete, why use Vim?
 

topcat001

macrumors regular
Nov 17, 2019
146
60
Xcode has a good share of bugs as well though. I've never really liked VS, but VS Code should have a shoutout. I have very little experience with it, but it's a cross-platform environment, very extensible, and almost universally loved. Personally I spend a lot of time in the JetBrains IDEs. They're excellent, though I also enjoy Xcode.

Anyways, main reason I'm quoting you... Why would you use Vim as your primary editor? Don't get me wrong, Vim is amazing and if all you have is a TTY it's a great choice. But with the ability to pick "Vim shortcuts" for either JetBrains' IDEs or VS code, and all the additional niceties they offer, like being able to type a single letter of a function and click enter and have it all auto-complete, why use Vim?
I agree about the nice IDEs and yes I do use Visual Studio on Windows, Pycharm, VS Code on Linux, etc. However with my custom setup for vim and tmux the difference is not as big as I thought it would be, amazingly. Maybe I'm too old school! Most of my work is highly optimised C/C++ with occasional python.

Also, I use OpenBSD as my primary desktop setup, and frequently work in Solaris and AIX. It's nice to have one editor which works identically everywhere, and which I'm comfortable with.